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Old 09-28-2016, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExNooYawk2 View Post
Very interesting and it would also give young folks a fresh perspective.
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Old 09-29-2016, 04:38 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
....Do you agree with him that younger adults just don't pay attention to or respect older people like they used to?
For the record, I am just shy of 79.

My answer, sure I agree with him. No question about it. (I am presuming that this "respect" referred to is more profound than simply helping the elderly cross the street, etc.)

But American (and some other societies too) have changed so enormously over the past eighty years that I find it unremarkable at this point. Despite nostalgic lip service to past values, society stresses the whims and wills of the isolated individual filled with desperate needs to be satisfied. It is what makes the economic world go round faster and faster, and that is what is most important to the society.

In many ways (not all certainly) it is the world of David Riesman's The Lonely Crowd having achieved major development.

However, as money makes this world go round, older people are dealt with in variety of commercial ways that have replaced those human relationships of decades gone by....nursing homes, senior centers, advertising directed specifically toward their age-condition, etc.............not that this means that older people get listened to by younger adults, but they are relocated into a useful commercial niche and get an obligatory PC nod.

Is it a problem?........hmmmmm. For the OP's barber, it may feel that way. For myself it is simply the way the present-day society works, it is a single change among hundreds...thousands in my lifetime. The end result of which is a society totally transformed from that of a half century ago. For myself it is one of the least bothersome changes of all...in fact, it doesn't figure in my ruminations.

The question strikes me as akin to the occasional threads on using spanking and other forms of physical discipline on children. Pointless. Such forms of discipline are anathema today, though normal in my childhood. But what is the point in lamenting their absence even if one thinks they were effective?

Bottom line: IT IS OVER, folks.

Respecting older adults in any ongoing, meaningful way or the physical discipline of young children or the superiority of the stay-at-home-mother, (and many other things) are threads in a social fabric long discarded. The society in which these things were integral is quite defunct. To lament them is to lament passenger pigeons and dodos.

If you are an older person who wants to be respected now get on one of Simon Cowell's shows and sing "There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight" or sit between Oprah and Dr. Oz for fifteen minutes. The barber has fared differently, he seems to have found the personal respect of the OP - a minuscule audience, of course - but one that probably had a reflection of the quality whose passing in society he was regretting.
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Old 09-29-2016, 04:40 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Very interesting and it would also give young folks a fresh perspective.
Seems to me that I have read a couple of articles about a senior residence in a big U.S. city that also has brought in college age residents....D.C., perhaps. Can't remember. Will try to find it if no one else posts on it.
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Old 09-29-2016, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,667 posts, read 33,667,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Do you agree with him that younger adults just don't pay attention to or respect older people like they used to?
Too many younger people were raised by mothers only so it could be the barber just feeling it as a man.
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Old 09-29-2016, 05:21 AM
 
Location: England
24,771 posts, read 6,161,507 times
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UNLwan8K-A
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Old 09-29-2016, 05:42 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Seems to me that I have read a couple of articles about a senior residence in a big U.S. city that also has brought in college age residents....D.C., perhaps. Can't remember. Will try to find it if no one else posts on it.
This is the link...the city is Cleveland

College Students are Living Rent-Free in a Cleveland Retirement Home | Innovation | Smithsonian
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Old 09-29-2016, 08:17 AM
 
1,083 posts, read 488,343 times
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Great post, kevxu.


I've noticed many older people also refuse help even if you offer it - seems to be a pride thing. Thus, I generally don't offer to assist unless they really appear to be struggling with something.

We all just want attention, agree that this is no different than the old/young dynamic of previous generations.
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Old 09-29-2016, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,753,854 times
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When did young people pay attention to old folks? Aside form my immediate family, I never paid attention to old folks when I was young. Throughout my life, I've typically spent the most time with people around my own age. When I was 15 what did I have in common with an 85 year old and vice versa? What does a 40 year old have in common with someone who's 92 and vice versa? It's really a 2 way street.
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Old 09-29-2016, 08:43 AM
 
Location: England
24,771 posts, read 6,161,507 times
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I look at it this way. I didn't pay much attention to old people when I was young....... why should I think they should now pay attention to me?

I used to look at old people like my Grandmother as quite boring and uninteresting. When I had to live with her for a while when I was 14, I didn't change my opinion. I sure wish now I had asked her more questions, but at the time I had more important things to do, or so I thought.

The world belongs to the young. Let them enjoy it, and live in it. I've had my time, and now it's their turn. My job is to try and not get in their way too much...............
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Old 09-29-2016, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
3,687 posts, read 1,863,297 times
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This does not bother me in the least. At a certain age, we all become irrelevant. I prefer to be an invisible observer, always have.
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