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Old 10-03-2016, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,043 posts, read 3,982,486 times
Reputation: 13557

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Forgot to mention...the book I have is titled "What my family should know" spiral organizer estate planning book. You can get it on Amazon, www.Amazon.com for $14.99. It's a notebook that has a place to put all your important details if you should pass. Such as family contacts, lawyer information, insurance company information with policy numbers, social security information, bank accounts, mortgage info, credit card info, etc. There's also a place where you can put a copy of a Will or Trust. It's a great tool to be organized and help your family if you should pass.

Last edited by CGab; 10-03-2016 at 12:06 PM.. Reason: More info needed
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Old 10-03-2016, 12:13 PM
 
Location: The sleepy part of New York City
1,939 posts, read 1,203,775 times
Reputation: 4302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linerin View Post
A friend of mine in an EMT and says this is an urban legend and they never go through cell phones. He had to be told what ICE stood for, and he's been an EMT for almost 2 decades in a very large city.
As a former EMT we didn't go through any ones phone or wallet either. EMT's are too busy trying to stabilize the patient in order to get them to the hospital. We don't notify next of kin. The hospital or police should do that.

Maybe that's what your friend was saying.
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Old 10-03-2016, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,043 posts, read 3,982,486 times
Reputation: 13557
Quote:
Originally Posted by elliedeee View Post
As a former EMT we didn't go through any ones phone or wallet either. EMT's are too busy trying to stabilize the patient in order to get them to the hospital. We don't notify next of kin. The hospital or police should do that.

Maybe that's what your friend was saying.


That makes sense
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Old 10-03-2016, 12:31 PM
 
527 posts, read 1,089,577 times
Reputation: 679
Using an Iphone that has been updated to IOS 8 or higher,

You can go to Health/Medical ID and fill out medical history, meds and emergency contacts.
Using this screen you can also indicate your preference concerning organ transplant

This can be set (or not) to be accessed bypassing the phone's passcode in an emergency.
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Old 10-03-2016, 12:33 PM
 
4,003 posts, read 2,605,489 times
Reputation: 8651
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
that is a great suggestion for those who have not done that.

the new cell phones. Smart phones understand ICE if it is in your contact list. It will be available even if the phone has a passcode just like 911.

I have a Samsung 7 Edge and I had to set it up so my ICE contacts would be available if my screen was locked. Other phones may require it to be set up as well.
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Old 10-03-2016, 02:14 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 37,629,184 times
Reputation: 39049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linerin View Post
A friend of mine in an EMT and says this is an urban legend and they never go through cell phones. He had to be told what ICE stood for, and he's been an EMT for almost 2 decades in a very large city.
Yep!

I was in a major accident, and they never checked my cell phone for any information.
When I asked about it, they said they are too busy with extraction and med-evac to look for a cell phone, yet alone go through it.

Last edited by Pitt Chick; 10-03-2016 at 03:17 PM..
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Old 10-03-2016, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Proxima Centauri
4,802 posts, read 1,983,159 times
Reputation: 5238
Quote:
Originally Posted by misscross View Post
Do any of you have good suggestions on how to ensure the appropriate lawyers, family members are contacted in the event of a sudden death?

We have very young minor children and live far from family members. How would anyone know to contact our local lawyer who set up our living trust? Once he is contacted at least he can reach out to family members particularly those who would take guardianship of the children, since he has all their contact information. However, he had no good recommendation on ensuring he'd be contacted upon our deaths other than maybe carry a business card in our wallets

He said if he happens to read an obituary type of notice in the paper he'll know, but in this day and age who even reads those? When the wife of a friend died locally at a young age, I didn't read or see any articles about her.

The worst case scenario is we both die suddenly in a car accident or similar and in the destruction nobody is going to find this guy's card. How will others know to contact this lawyer regarding assets, guardianship, life insurance policy beneficiaries? I see how police can figure out next of kin, but they wouldn't know about the lawyer. Our closest friends now live out of state, I have considered approaching other good friends here but they're in neighboring cities so may not know about any sudden death all that quickly.

Has anyone dealt with something similar?
I'm not an attorney but it seems that there are next of kin documents that you fill out at work. There should be an alternate person that can be contacted in those forms. Since you are concerned about no one hearing, perhaps asking the police what their procedures are in the worst case situation.

Since you have an attorney I assume that you also have a will that not only names a guardian but an executor in the event that the worst happens. The police may have a procedure that contacts the guardian and perhaps the executor too.

Have some peace of mind. I doubt that these things are neglected.

When I was a kid my father's car was broadsided by a truck. Back in the fifties the cars were built like tanks. Evidently my father was too. The police came to my door and spoke to my mother. I'm in my sixties and I still remember the sick feeling in my stomach. My father was held in the hospital over night for observation only and went back to work in that same car two days later.

Last edited by Tonyafd; 10-03-2016 at 04:36 PM..
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Old 10-03-2016, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,940 posts, read 5,297,242 times
Reputation: 17897
Quote:
Originally Posted by misscross View Post
Do any of you have good suggestions on how to ensure the appropriate lawyers, family members are contacted in the event of a sudden death?

We have very young minor children and live far from family members. How would anyone know to contact our local lawyer who set up our living trust? Once he is contacted at least he can reach out to family members particularly those who would take guardianship of the children, since he has all their contact information. However, he had no good recommendation on ensuring he'd be contacted upon our deaths other than maybe carry a business card in our wallets

He said if he happens to read an obituary type of notice in the paper he'll know, but in this day and age who even reads those? When the wife of a friend died locally at a young age, I didn't read or see any articles about her.

The worst case scenario is we both die suddenly in a car accident or similar and in the destruction nobody is going to find this guy's card. How will others know to contact this lawyer regarding assets, guardianship, life insurance policy beneficiaries? I see how police can figure out next of kin, but they wouldn't know about the lawyer. Our closest friends now live out of state, I have considered approaching other good friends here but they're in neighboring cities so may not know about any sudden death all that quickly.

Has anyone dealt with something similar?
The person with guardianship should be in your wallet and refrigerator. THEY will contact the attorney because you have already told them about this.
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Old 10-03-2016, 04:28 PM
 
Location: The sleepy part of New York City
1,939 posts, read 1,203,775 times
Reputation: 4302
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
The person with guardianship should be in your wallet and refrigerator. THEY will contact the attorney because you have already told them about this.
But will they fit?
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Old 10-03-2016, 04:47 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 37,629,184 times
Reputation: 39049
Quote:
Originally Posted by elliedeee View Post
But will they fit?
Hahahahaha!
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