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Old 10-18-2016, 12:32 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Well, maybe we don't "get" how to build one or most of how to repair one but almost all of us under age 75 know how to use one.

And computers are not obsolete if you have work to do. Smartphones are okay for playing games or doing simple lookups, texting--you can do lots of things on a phone, but if you need to write a long paper or do serious research, you need a screen that's big enough to read easily. Keys to type on help too. I would imagine that graphics would need a larger screen too.
LOL @ trying to use a gimp 'puter (aka supposedly smart phone) as a real computer. How many WPM can you type!
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Old 10-18-2016, 12:36 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
I went to San Francisco a couple of years ago and realized that I am going to have to get up to speed on technology if I want to travel efficiently after retirement. Without being enrolled in an electronic toll collection program, I was unable to use certain bridges or roads. If I missed an exit, it was very hard to backtrack using my paper maps. Having poor night vision did not help. Once in the city without a rental car, I was unable to look up public transportation routes on my small laptop ahead of time in the hotel. The information on routes was organized by indicating your start and finish destinations and the time of day so was more appropriate to a smart phone. I ended up walking a lot which cut into my sightseeing time. Another area where a smart phone would come in handy is buying tickets for popular attractions (that tend to sell out) while you are out sightseeing and in the vicinity and better know your schedule.
Just FYI the only bridge here that is completely automated at the tolls is the Golden Gate Bridge, the rest all still have some cash lanes with real people. Even the Golden Gate does not require a transponder or going on the web - they will take photo of the plates and you might eventually receive a bill.
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Old 10-18-2016, 12:42 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiganGreg View Post
I think the level of technology people are comfortable with could be closely associated to their type of work. As an engineer, I use computers all the time, DW was an electronics R&D prototype tech when she used to work. These careers filtered into daily life. Tech Limits?? I deliberately said 'NO' to a VPN (Virtual Private Network) to my home systems; work is work, home is mostly for 'play' . I do have access to my company email on my smartphone, that is as involved as I care to go there.

All our finances are online; bill-pay, retirement accts, banking, etc. For play, (not counting transient laptops), DW and I have 4 systems networked at home, one as an image/media server for our digital cameras and music/videos, one dedicated for electronic/mechanical CAD, and two browsers and game systems. I have a full electronics lab (scopes/analyzers, microscope and static SMT workstations) for building/upgrading systems- and even repairing them when they break. We buy laptops, but I build all the rest of the systems from scratch. We ran out of space on our personal computers for RAW images, and now use network backup for our media. Also we have so many music CDs it was getting ridiculous, so we started ripping them to store MP3 playlists on our phones. When we retire, we will tackle the vinyl conversions (too many to do with our current available time). With Bluetooth and USB interfaces in the car (one doesn't even have a CD player in it ), it is the easiest way to listen to our favorite music when on trips. We love photography, but a couple weeks outing can kill a hard-drive quickly...even a 2TB system. To make matters worse, a) I like RAW HDR photography, and that is a killer, and b) I am getting more and more into music production using synthesizers, real guitars/piano with computer-based multi-track recording. That also pounds on our storage requirements. Don't know about DW, but I am a tech addict. Even when we go hiking, the cameras come along.

Tech manufacturers LOVE u$.
When will you start making your own SSDs? Haha!
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Old 10-18-2016, 12:45 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dothetwist View Post
We are debating getting a smart phone.

One q. I have is re: security.

You have EVERYTHING on the phone which you carry around EVERYWHERE. Our laptop and netbook, are secure at my home...yes theft is possible (though not likely), given the ages of both these items and their low-end brands.

But a new I-Phone....those are highly desired by thieves, no?? And with all the data (banking, etc.)....what if someone snatches it if I leave it behind somewhere or takes it out of my car or home?? How safe is my data on an I-phone (or other smart phone)?
Most people use their supposedly smart phones in a dumb manner. They hoard data on the phone's local storage and never download it to something proper like a lap top and attached storage. The better way is use it as a terminal and temporary storage, download daily or more frequently and wipe clean anything that is on the phone's storage device which is a solid state drive built right into the phone.
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Old 10-19-2016, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,417 posts, read 21,263,654 times
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I always know in advance what I'll be buying one of these days, it comes from my fierce hatred/aversion to something. Like they say in the Far East, hate can turn to love in a split second, love can turn to hate in a split second. Based on my history, how many times has something hateful ended up as a charge on my credit card?

So, one of these days, I'll probably own a Smartphone!

And one of these days I'll have Sprint un-block Texting on my phone!

But, no, no, NO! I ain't giving up my low-tech 1985 Toyota Supra for a new car where I'll need more than a driver's manual to figure out how to operate it correctly!
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Old 10-19-2016, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,945,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dothetwist View Post
We are debating getting a smart phone.

One q. I have is re: security.

You have EVERYTHING on the phone which you carry around EVERYWHERE. Our laptop and netbook, are secure at my home...yes theft is possible (though not likely), given the ages of both these items and their low-end brands.

But a new I-Phone....those are highly desired by thieves, no?? And with all the data (banking, etc.)....what if someone snatches it if I leave it behind somewhere or takes it out of my car or home?? How safe is my data on an I-phone (or other smart phone)?
It's the iPhone itself that is apt to be the target of thieves - not the data on it:

iPhone: Apple smartphones are most likely to be stolen, says Government | The Independent

That said - there are thieves who target data (from all phones). Especially if you're using non-secure "public wifi".

The remedy is to avoid using public wifi for sensitive work. Including things like banking. And also to use the apps or similar that can lock your phone remotely if it's stolen or lost:

How to Remotely Disable Your Lost or Stolen Phone | PCMag.com

Robyn
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Old 10-19-2016, 08:39 AM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,046 posts, read 20,382,028 times
Reputation: 22834
Default iPhone is good

Quote:
Originally Posted by dothetwist View Post
But a new I-Phone....all the data (banking, etc.)....what if someone snatches it if I leave it behind somewhere...? How safe is my data on an I-phone...?
1. Access to your iPhone is via:
a. a passcode of 4-6 digits
b. your fingerprint

2. https://www.igeeksblog.com/apple-kil...eft-worldwide/

3. How private is your iPhone data, and how to protect your iPhone privacy - News - Macworld UK

4. https://www.apple.com/business/docs/...rity_Guide.pdf
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