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Old 10-23-2016, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,704,584 times
Reputation: 35450

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Today many have options... not like before.

A big move 30 years ago would have been from the Bay Area to the Foothills...

Now people move out of State like it is nothing...

I'm beginning to wonder if any of my co-workers will stay in the Bay Area... popular destinations are AZ, TX, NV, OR... even two to FL

I never seem to hear any moving to the North East... not a single one or Kansas, Oklahoma, Ohio... etc.

As a life long Bay Area Native... I have never seen commute traffic as it is now... and this is a huge change from just 4 to 5 years ago.

Surely you've heard of me. I moved from the PNW to Ohio after I retired.
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Old 10-23-2016, 02:23 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,392,336 times
Reputation: 20439
Ooops...
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Old 10-23-2016, 03:01 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,104,537 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
I thought you had to sign up for SS benefits to enroll in Medicare? Is that not correct? Or did he perhaps decline to enroll in Medicare too?

There is a PSA (and website) for that:

socialsecurity.gov/MedicareOnly
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Old 10-23-2016, 03:13 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,529,524 times
Reputation: 29083
Default Americans just wanna have retirement

You say that as if it's a bad thing.
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Old 10-23-2016, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Northern NJ
7,954 posts, read 7,932,960 times
Reputation: 11183
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Ask now what your country can do for you but what your country is doing to you.

The Kennedy quote is one of the most odious sentiments ever expressed, demanding sacrifice as a central virtue, when it is anything but a virtue. Kennedy was a collectivist swine. The correct and moral quote? "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for yourself".
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Old 10-23-2016, 09:35 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,529,524 times
Reputation: 29083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Paolella View Post
The Kennedy quote is one of the most odious sentiments ever expressed, demanding sacrifice as a central virtue, when it is anything but a virtue. Kennedy was a collectivist swine. The correct and moral quote? "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for yourself".
I didn't realize this was a political board. What have I missed?
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Old 10-24-2016, 01:06 AM
 
Location: Northern NJ
7,954 posts, read 7,932,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I didn't realize this was a political board. What have I missed?
The point was philosophical, not political. The sentiment just happened to be expressed by a politician. And philosophy is very relevant to retirement. Some people regard the concept as good and wonderful. Placing positive value on the idle tinkering and bothering the kids and grandkids that consumes them after they no longer work. I consider retirement a spiritual form of death, like walking into the waiting room and reading the magazines prior to non-existence. However, that is only my opinion, and it is unpopular, and I recognize that most people hold an entirely different opinion.

While I love tinkering and the idle construction of silly chores and diversions as a brief timeout, I would never stop working to make the choice to embrace that kind of activity full time. The idea of sitting around and golfing, fishing, gardening, etc., strikes me as an absurd way to spend one's last years of existence. However, to each his own. Live and let die...
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Old 10-24-2016, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,704,584 times
Reputation: 35450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Paolella View Post
The point was philosophical, not political. The sentiment just happened to be expressed by a politician. And philosophy is very relevant to retirement. Some people regard the concept as good and wonderful. Placing positive value on the idle tinkering and bothering the kids and grandkids that consumes them after they no longer work. I consider retirement a spiritual form of death, like walking into the waiting room and reading the magazines prior to non-existence. However, that is only my opinion, and it is unpopular, and I recognize that most people hold an entirely different opinion.

While I love tinkering and the idle construction of silly chores and diversions as a brief timeout, I would never stop working to make the choice to embrace that kind of activity full time. The idea of sitting around and golfing, fishing, gardening, etc., strikes me as an absurd way to spend one's last years of existence. However, to each his own. Live and let die...
You appear to have quite a narrow view on life.

How about the idea of volunteering after retirement? There are many organizations like Habitat For Humanity or animal rescue that always need help. How about consulting within your area of expertise? How about starting up a small business? Driving for Uber? Traveling?

There are so many things a person can do once they no longer have to be under the yoke of the time clock. I know retirees who are busier after retirement than when they were working.

Waiting for death? It will have to find them first.
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Old 10-24-2016, 09:58 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,392,336 times
Reputation: 20439
Coming from a family where no one retires... it is not without regrets... it is more of time simply running out.

Retirement can be the start of a second career or long put off accomplishment..

Several of my friends built homes after retirement... as in doing much of the actual work.

A lot of my friends are retired military... all have picked up second careers.

Others happily take care of Grandchildren... one very good friend missed just about all of his daughter's early years as he was deployed... at age 75 his only grandchild was born... his daughter and son in law were struggling with day care and it was not going well... my friend found a new and better purpose and was able to experience so much of what was missed...

He just turned 90 and is still the one taking her to school and picking her up... they are extremely close and for him it changed his life forever as his daughter came down with cancer and it was touch and go for 5 years...

Think of retirement as transition... and many are able to shape as they see fit.
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Old 10-24-2016, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Northern NJ
7,954 posts, read 7,932,960 times
Reputation: 11183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
You appear to have quite a narrow view on life.

How about the idea of volunteering after retirement? There are many organizations like Habitat For Humanity or animal rescue that always need help. How about consulting within your area of expertise? How about starting up a small business? Driving for Uber? Traveling?

There are so many things a person can do once they no longer have to be under the yoke of the time clock. I know retirees who are busier after retirement than when they were working.

Waiting for death? It will have to find them first.

Actually, none of the retirement activities you describe are what I define as "tinkering". I am good with what you are describing. I will joyfully die working, barring a long terminal illness, so I will not transition to these types of activities, but they are purposeful and "engaged" activities that are not found in death's waiting room.
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