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Old 11-05-2016, 12:55 AM
 
2,132 posts, read 1,020,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Most of this would have zero effect on you, unless you chose to go out and check-out a riot and get hit with a flying rock, or something not too brainy like that. No Greek is going to be interested in knocking your block off, and do you really care about the local political upheaval?....what political upheaval in Greece in the last thirty or forty years would have threatened an American living in Greece? As for the fascist movement, you have just as much in the U.S., and no body seems terribly nutso about it.

What the Greeks are concerned about is whether you think you are going to work there or retire. The former alternative has several options.

Retirement has recently required only an income of 2,000 euros per month. If you buy a house, you can import the funds from your U.S. bank, but you must show that you can pay the taxes on it as well.

Where is the link to the claim that one needs "hundreds of thousands of dollars to be put in a Greek bank before you can go live there"? This does not jibe with info I had in the recent past.

I feel there are reasons not to go live in Greece, but none of the above are among them.
You really think political upheaval and large numbers of hate groups don't affect foreigners? Like, somebody from Kenya wouldn't have had to worry about moving to Alabama in the 1930s? LOL!

We do not have fascists like Greece currently has fascists. They're a tiny minority here. There, they are loud, organized, numerous, and belligerent.

2000 EU is about $2500 USD. I don't make NEARLY that much. What I do make, I could live on quite well in many places in Greece (and other countries).

The information comes directly from the Greek government website. And no, I don't want to buy a house there. I wouldn't want to live there permanently, but imagined I might find it pleasant for 5 or 10 years to rent a small place. But I don't qualify. I'm not rich enough to move to Greece to save money, LOL!
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Old 11-05-2016, 03:34 AM
 
Location: On the road
6,040 posts, read 2,938,059 times
Reputation: 11638
Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
There's no doubt in my mind a smart person can live in the USA for what it costs to live in many of those countries. Many cities in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas have very cheap housing, and at least you can still speak the language.
Some of them, but not all of them and certainly not at the same standard of living. I firmly believe that moving overseas to live cheaply is a poor idea for most people, but there is little doubt a smart person can live in most of SE Asia or Central America for far cheaper than possible in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoastguyz View Post
I've looked at those articles where the writer reports on these hidden sweet spots to live in different countries, but the economy drives everything, and once those places become known the prices start to escalate and before you know it, it doesn't look like a financial heaven it once did.
I'm not sure this is true.

Take Chiang Mai, Thailand for example. It exploded as an expat haven a long time ago, yet here we are today and it is still a cheap place for expats to move. Sure lots of expats complain about rising prices or painful visa runs with talk of relocating to Cambodia but bottom line that place is still far cheaper than anywhere in USA.
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Old 11-05-2016, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,872,245 times
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lieqiang your words are so true. Yes it is not for everybody. Some people would just not adjust to a new country no matter how inexpensive it is for them. But for anyone out there that think a shack in Toad Suck Arkansas is going to make you feel like your a king well I have some news for you.

There are so many people that just leave the US and only come back to keep citizenship here active. There are expats in nearly every country. Many of them went for the cost of living.
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Old 11-05-2016, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Miraflores
788 posts, read 899,177 times
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I first came to Peru to marry my Wife and have a family. I was more interested in the better climate and quality of life, than the low cost of living. I was back stateside two weeks ago with my family Denver/Miami/Orlando after a 6 year hiatus and things were much more expensive than I have become accustomed too. We need to move back stateside for five years, so my young wife can collect my social security when I am gone, but we keep pushing the date back as we do not like what we see.
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Old 11-05-2016, 10:29 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,947 posts, read 1,608,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Some of them, but not all of them and certainly not at the same standard of living. I firmly believe that moving overseas to live cheaply is a poor idea for most people, but there is little doubt a smart person can live in most of SE Asia or Central America for far cheaper than possible in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas.


I'm not sure this is true.

Take Chiang Mai, Thailand for example. It exploded as an expat haven a long time ago, yet here we are today and it is still a cheap place for expats to move. Sure lots of expats complain about rising prices or painful visa runs with talk of relocating to Cambodia but bottom line that place is still far cheaper than anywhere in USA.


Moving somewhere just to live cheaply is not advisable as the only condition unless one is really in a desperate state financially. In all seriousness I would feel more out of place & lonely in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas, (Austin area excepted), than I would in Chiang Mai, having visited there several times.

Santiago Chile is a delightful, cosmopolitan place & Spanish is relatively easy to learn, Thai isn't. Fiji is beautiful but I would get island fever after a few months, same thing would happen to me in Oklahoma too. Malaysia was on that list I believe & that is also a really nice place with english widely spoken, I would be interested in checking out Penang, or possibly a suburb of Singapore, though personally the heat/humidity thing I find very oppressive. Still if I had to live on $2K/mo these would be active alternatives for me, always a sucker for these lists.
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Old 11-05-2016, 10:42 AM
 
4,342 posts, read 2,282,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I'll be moving to Libya next week, LOL!!
yea, this list is something else...

Iran, Libya, Syria, also Brasil and El Salvador (murder capitals of the Americas), although I did see Fiji on the list.
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Old 11-05-2016, 11:12 AM
 
249 posts, read 198,202 times
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Obviously this is a discussion of the cheapest countries to live in, low cost is nice and top priority for many people. For some living in and adjusting to differences in another country is an adventures, a bonus in addition to the low cost. For others the differences are uncomfortable if not impossible. Before even considering such a move one must be honest with them self about their comfort level.
Living in Mexico I saw too many people who disliked the Mexican culture, thought their way was the right way and got frustrated when they couldn't find English speaking people to help them.
Moving to a foreign country requires a sense of adventure, this is why some prefer a foreign country even knowing they can live in the USA for about the same COL.
I know retirees living in Mexico who own expensive properties, one friend has a home in San Miguel de Allende and another beachfront home in Sayulita, obviously he can afford to live in the USA, but not the lifestyle he seeks.
I see some in the USA struggling financially when I believe they would enjoy life more at Lake Chapala.
Each person must do what is comfortable for them, I only encourage people to consider other options, knowing one option isn't right for everyone.
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Old 11-05-2016, 05:02 PM
 
Location: On the road
6,040 posts, read 2,938,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpineprince View Post
We need to move back stateside for five years, so my young wife can collect my social security when I am gone, but we keep pushing the date back as we do not like what we see.
Curious = is it just the cost of living that you don't like or something else? We were back in the United States for a visit in Sept/Oct, main thing that got me was sticker shock on eating out. Got pretty used to eating out for almost every meal overseas because it is so cheap, not possible in USA. That said, it was nice to be back for awhile I did miss a lot of things about home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmarlin20 View Post
Moving to a foreign country requires a sense of adventure, this is why some prefer a foreign country even knowing they can live in the USA for about the same COL.
I know retirees living in Mexico who own expensive properties, one friend has a home in San Miguel de Allende and another beachfront home in Sayulita, obviously he can afford to live in the USA, but not the lifestyle he seeks.
Yep. We know a lady who has big plans to retire to Ecuador and live cheaply, but every trip she makes down there she comes back with talk of some 350k condo on the beach, which I doubt would be saving her any money versus living in USA. Granted she'd be on the beach, so it's apples and oranges.
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Old 11-05-2016, 05:09 PM
 
4,342 posts, read 2,282,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
lieqiang your words are so true. Yes it is not for everybody. Some people would just not adjust to a new country no matter how inexpensive it is for them. But for anyone out there that think a shack in Toad Suck Arkansas is going to make you feel like your a king well I have some news for you.

There are so many people that just leave the US and only come back to keep citizenship here active. There are expats in nearly every country. Many of them went for the cost of living.
I was in Costa Rica and I met an elderly Canadian Couple at the bank. They were retired government workers. I asked them how they liked it and they both said they did but they both looked like troopers - they needed to be since neither spoke a word of Spanish.

BTW you do not have to come back to the US to keep Citizenship active. In fact, you can only lose it by actively renouncing it - a very rare process.
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Old 11-07-2016, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Miraflores
788 posts, read 899,177 times
Reputation: 1546
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Curious = is it just the cost of living that you don't like or something else? We were back in the United States for a visit in Sept/Oct, main thing that got me was sticker shock on eating out. Got pretty used to eating out for almost every meal overseas because it is so cheap, not possible in USA. That said, it was nice to be back for awhile I did miss a lot of things about home.


Yep. We know a lady who has big plans to retire to Ecuador and live cheaply, but every trip she makes down there she comes back with talk of some 350k condo on the beach, which I doubt would be saving her any money versus living in USA. Granted she'd be on the beach, so it's apples and oranges.
No, as we are moving back temporarily, I am well aware of the cost of living. Rents for something similar to my situation are about 3x more in Florida cities and 4x more in Denver. Luckily, we were able to rule out Denver (daughter lives there) as it is pretty certain the ex-wife is moving their.

Denver was nice but the downtown rolled up the sidewalks at about 9:30 on a Sat night!

Florida another option seemed like a ghost state as the strip malls all contained cheesy stores with alot of for rent signs and when you went into the dept stores Ross,Kols etc there was nobody there but the employees.

We found the food to be generally disappointing, but we live in the "food capital"of the world.

Transportation was lacking or expensive, we needed a rental car wherever we were. Here, I just tap the Uber app on my cellphone and can go anywhere in the city for a couple of bucks and the person on the other end can see exactly where I am and how long till I get there. In Denver my daughter lives about 20 min away from the Hyatt Regency where we were staying and the light rail option does not go that far.

Talking to my Father 98 y/o , He told me it is a $600.00 ambulance ride to the local hospital which is less than a 1 mile from his house. Here, were we live the Doctor comes to my house ( for my kids) within an hour or two and 10 min after he leaves the pharmacist shows up to deliver the prescriptions. All for $20.00 medicine included and I only pay a $50.00 month premium for each kid.

Language was never a problem as it seemed everyplace the employees spoke Spanish. Rental car bus drivers were usually retirees and all were extremely nice people especially in Florida. The same goes for everyone we encountered at the theme park hotels and the park shuttles.

Another downside was hotel parking (I do not own a car) and paid $12.00 a day in Florida and $36.00 in Denver.

My biggest gripe was that a lot of the time businesses would not accept cash and wanted a Credit Card, which I never use in Peru as Dollars are accepted everywhere. The only reason I use a CC here is when the Dollar is rising and I am making a large purchase. I will Pay in local currency on my CC than pay it off a month later with the stronger Dollars and make a few percent on the exchange rate.
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