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Old 11-13-2016, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,452 posts, read 3,673,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shamrock4 View Post
I think that style of living is based on personal preferences, unless you really have no choice and need the medical care and help.

We were among the youngest on our very friendly street when we moved in decades ago, but now the older crowd has mostly moved out or died. Now the street is regenerating with young people with children and we enjoy it.

We do not have grandkids yet and there is something special about talking with a preschooler about their Halloween costume or watching them learn to ride a bike. The other day one ran up to me grinning all over to show the gaping space where her tooth had fallen out.

Guess because I worked with children during my career I find it uplifting and happy, and being around all older folks would make me feel I was in the final chapter of my life. I can't imagine that until at least my 80s.

I also have visited these places and lovely as some are, I find them depressing. To each his/her own.
I agree with nearly everything you say and our life experiences mirror yours. We are not considering moving to a CCRC now but am accepting of the fact this may be our best available choice in another 10-15 years. Our friends are still in the neighborhood but we realize that may not always be the case. The energy and optimism of young children can be uplifting but we are not really friends with any of their parents, the generation younger than us. Time may change things for the better with friendships developing with the young parents as they become empty nesters themselves, but we are open to exploring other scenarios as well.
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Old 11-13-2016, 10:57 AM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
277 posts, read 298,635 times
Reputation: 489
Again, I don't know if it's universal, but Mom's CCRC has an upper age limit, I believe 83, and you have to be relatively healthy to move in.
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Old 11-13-2016, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
6,130 posts, read 9,095,981 times
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My Mom survived just 3 months in a Brookdale community here, before I took her out of there. It was a constant fight to get anyone to do anything there, plus many other things that just made me plain mad. Her fee was $3500 a month. The activities were the same. The meal service was the same, with some very fancy French cuisine, which I thought was ridiculous. Apparently Brookdale has upped its fees since 4 years ago, when Mom was there.
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Old 11-13-2016, 12:10 PM
 
6,891 posts, read 7,297,903 times
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Quote:
They sold 2,200 homes last year and people love it there. The pace of home sales is declining and one observation why is that the current crop of young retirees are the last of the lucky pensioners. Trying to manage affording CCRC's and other senior options isn't just initially being able to afford but in maintaining the needed annual cash flow. When you get right down to being admitted to a lot of the higher end CCRC's you need more income and assets than many realize.
I'm 56, and have a family friend whose parents (and now just dad in his 80s) -- and bought into a CCRC over a decade ago when they were in their -- early 70s. It's been great.

In this thread in others, there has been some discussion -- and concern, quite frankly -- about the finance model of some CCRC's, and how they'll continue to provide services as their residents need more care, and the cost of that care rises.

Personally, I will be watching and following this issue. And at 56, I've got time to really see how some longterm issues are addressed, especially by the CCRCs that will be well over 30 years sold by the time I really start considering one.

The generation behind many of us here -- who won't have pensions -- IS an interesting tidbit to be mindful of….especially for those of us at the very tail end of the baby boomers. How will a place we might buy into sustain itself if no one behind us can afford to come in?

As with this and any other issue -- be it Soc. Sec. LTCI, health care, estate planning, whatever…all we can do is stay informed, watch -- and better yet, try to ANTICIPATE -- the trends, and plan the best we can to have as many options at our disposal as possible.
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Old 11-13-2016, 12:40 PM
 
29,805 posts, read 34,894,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mastequila View Post
Again, I don't know if it's universal, but Mom's CCRC has an upper age limit, I believe 83, and you have to be relatively healthy to move in.
Yup
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Old 11-13-2016, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,239,955 times
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Parents moved into CCRC last year at age 79. They seem to enjoy it. Always busy with social activities. Both are physically active (Dad swims, walks an hour every day, uses treadmill, weights; Mom walks everyday 1 hr). Cost them $250k buy-in and they pay somewhere around $5k/month. Includes 21 days of dinner in nice restaurant. Home is an apartment 2 rooms, approx 1,100 sq feet, and a carport. They're fortunate to have the assets to afford this. It's a lot of money, but not a worry for them. They wanted to enter on their terms and were probably a few years too early but wanted to get in before any significant medical condition crept up that might have precluded them entering (ie dementia or major medical issues).

They are with a company called Brookdale here in the Florida Gulf Coast area -
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Old 11-13-2016, 04:34 PM
 
14,266 posts, read 24,016,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingatFL View Post
The local CCRC (which gets high marks) held a fundraiser today for Alzheimer's research. We liked the cause so decided to go and donate. While we were there we talked to the sales and marketing director. The grounds were lovely. The independent living apartments were small. A 900 sq foot unit includes weekly maid service, scheduled transportation services, 24-hour emergency response, outings, exercise, health and wellness programs, utilities (gas, electric, cable and water), breakfast and either lunch or dinner. Monthly rental fee is $6,065.

I asked what the average age of their residents in independent living is. The average age is 85.

I asked to see their scheduled activities for the month. They include: trips to the grocery store, chair yoga, painting classes, Christian bible services, poker, knitting/crocheting together, meditation and relaxation, Tai Chi, billiards, afternoon socials, iPad exploration, bridge, "flex your brain", pizza party, bingo, a trip to the mall, trips to the bank, canine visits, happy hour.

Maybe I am a little too young for this, but it seemed like rather boring and sedentary monthly activities. Although at age 85 I don't know what I will be capable of.



CCRC are NOT generally geared toward people who are under 70 years old nor are they "active retirement communities." The local one has an average age of 75-80 and is geared toward older seniors.

My experience is that MOST people generally prefer an active community until 75-80 and then move to a CCRC when they no longer want to maintain a household. I am working with an older couple aged 78 who are evaluating the local CCRCs. They are currently living in a 3000 sq ft home and really don't want to spend their energy maintaining it as they get older.

As for the menu served, you generally serve an upscale menu when you invite guests, don't you? I will admit that our local CCRC serves a "Taste of" where the food is great and where those motivated to eat a healthy diet have those options. If you were SERIOUS about the community, you could easily ask the residents how the meals are handled and how well special dietary requests are handled.

With the quantity that MANY older seniors eat, I am more concerned that they are eating enough to maintain their strength than whether they are eating the "right" stuff. I am the one that makes the "Ensure runs" in my neighborhood.
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Old 11-13-2016, 05:00 PM
 
1,227 posts, read 1,262,186 times
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Thank you, Jlawrence. I will revisit the CCRC issue in a couple of decades. I'm not certain that I want an "active retirement community" being that we are pretty antisocial, but I go back and forth on whether or not this would be good for us. A lot of what I am doing now is really to help define my plans for later in life... but things change and it's hard to plan very far out.
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Old 11-14-2016, 08:06 AM
 
29,805 posts, read 34,894,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingatFL View Post
Thank you, Jlawrence. I will revisit the CCRC issue in a couple of decades. I'm not certain that I want an "active retirement community" being that we are pretty antisocial, but I go back and forth on whether or not this would be good for us. A lot of what I am doing now is really to help define my plans for later in life... but things change and it's hard to plan very far out.
Bada Bing and it has been very helpful for us looking at it now with thoughts for down the road being made. A lot will change before we get to that point at least hopefully it will be a few years. I am now realizing that in addition to focusing on our ability to pay along with the financial model and strength of the facility we need to pay equal attention to the ability of others to pay along side us or to replace us and others in the facility as we pass on.

Tying money up in the buy in could result in money lost regardless of guarantees. Facilities that have no buy in and charge a monthly fee sound good now but changes in SS and pensions along with Medicare could seriously erode the abilty of folks to pay in future years. Not cool if you can pay and 50% of the facility is empty because the percentage of folks with sufficient fixed income has declined.

It is best to have sizable fixed income and a decent size portfolio both in amounts that the vast majority will not have now and even less so in the future. The potential for over build is considerable.
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Old 11-14-2016, 10:01 AM
 
1,227 posts, read 1,262,186 times
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Thank you, TuborgP. I hadn't yet given thought to the fact that it might be difficult to fill the CCRC in the future. Also, if most seniors are looking at the newly built CCRC because of average age of residents, that makes the older CCRC harder to fill too. There is also the issue that 30 years into the future (at a time I might be moving into a CCRC) the things people are interested in doing or capable of doing may be very changed due to advances in medicine or technology. So there is also the question of whether or not the older CCRC buildings will be able to accommodate those advances.

And, for me and my peers, any CCRC being built now will be an old CCRC by the time we are ready to move in.

I would so much prefer not to be this up in the air regarding my future.
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