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Old 11-28-2016, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
30,989 posts, read 13,564,601 times
Reputation: 22078

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
According to data analysis firm CoreLogic, for every homeowner moving to California, three homeowners are leaving. That's the middle class. The poor aren't leaving California because nowhere else will they find the generous handouts they get in California. And don't forget about the 2.4 million illegal aliens in California. They're not going anywhere and that number will only increase. And then there are all the businesses leaving California due to the onerous regulation burden. Over 10,000 left between 2008 and 2015. Pretty soon all that will remain are the super wealthy and the downtrodden poor. At least the nice weather will stick around.
From another source: The trend of out-migration was also noted in a separte trio of reports released earlier this year by Beacon Economics. Beacon noted that 625,000 more U.S. residents left California between 2007 and 2014 than moved into the state. The vast majority ended up in Texas, Oregon, Nevada, Arizona and Washington. The search for more affordable housing is sending low- and middle-income workers out of the state, while higher-wage workers continue to move in, which argues against the theory that high taxes are driving people away.
Californians fleeing state's high cost of housing - The Orange County Register

Regarding the 2.4 million 'illegal aliens' in California, you need to put that number in perspective, maybe the map from this source will help.
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Old 11-28-2016, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
We have different ideas of what makes a modest home.

A $80k to $125k home is more modest home in my mind. Not a low priced home, and not a high priced home.

Fine, but this thread is about California. None of us are surprised that property is a lot less expensive in the "forests of Maine", where you live. What something is "worth" is quite simply what people are willing to pay for it. As an example, if we take two identical houses on the same sized piece of land, one in rural Maine and one in Southern California, the price of one bears absolutely no relevance to the price of the other.


I have nothing but respect for you, Submariner, as you have found a location that fits your needs, wants, and financial situation. But your post which I quoted above has nothing to do with this thread.
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Old 11-28-2016, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
5,686 posts, read 4,408,388 times
Reputation: 11639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
The 'veteran' discount is for 100% disabled vets. I am not old enough for a senior discount.

2bdrm homes here start at $25k.

My home is 'large' [foundation is 2400 sq ft, overall roofed footprint 4900 sq ft] on 150 acres and my total taxes are under $800 [$600 for the house and $157 for the land].
How is this relevant to retiring in CA? Which is the topic of this Thread.
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Old 11-28-2016, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,671 posts, read 49,423,020 times
Reputation: 19124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Fine, but this thread is about California. None of us are surprised that property is a lot less expensive in the "forests of Maine", where you live. What something is "worth" is quite simply what people are willing to pay for it. As an example, if we take two identical houses on the same sized piece of land, one in rural Maine and one in Southern California, the price of one bears absolutely no relevance to the price of the other.


I have nothing but respect for you, Submariner, as you have found a location that fits your needs, wants, and financial situation. But your post which I quoted above has nothing to do with this thread.
I apologise for dragging this state into the thread.



Is a modest home for retirees really $550k to $650k?

The average pension income is not very high.
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Old 11-28-2016, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
........................
Is a modest home for retirees really $550k to $650k?

The average pension income is not very high.

Yes, in some parts of Southern California a modest home is really that much, and yes, that's a hell of a lot. In other parts, a modest home can be had for less. That's why the "average" retiree is not moving to California.


Of course, "modest" needs to be defined. I have a "modest" town house of two bedrooms plus loft, two and a half bathrooms, and a two-car garage. There is a pool shared by the 26 units. It's more than I really need for one person, but it suits me just fine. Almost 16 years ago I bought it for $190,000; now it's worth about $400,000.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,886 posts, read 2,033,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
The search for more affordable housing is sending low- and middle-income workers out of the state, while higher-wage workers continue to move in, which argues against the theory that high taxes are driving people away.

I would not agree that the low and middle income folks leaving argues against the theory that high taxes are driving people away.

These are the people that are most affected by all the non-income related taxes and tax like fees. They are not so poor to get it for free, but not rich enough for it to be affordable without having to cut something else to manage their budget.

For example, they do not qualify for a free cell phone with unlimited text and minutes--they pay for theirs.

The increase in the cost of registration of vehicles is paid for by them...and it went up much more than inflation or their budgets. Again the rich can afford the fees, and the poorest do not register and insure their vehicles anyway.

The rural area fire 'fee' which is nothing but a tax is paid by them. People on assisted housing are not affected by the increase in rent--their payment is controlled by their assistance benefits. And the rich are not living in these rural areas.

And there are hundreds more of these types of taxes/tax like fees.

All of these little nickel and dime fees and taxes do affect the lower and middle class of CA--and those that are high enough in income to make enough money to barely support themselves without qualifying for any of the assistance programs are hurt the most. These are the ones that leave--they can not afford to live here anymore.

The ultra wealthy, can afford the fees/taxes, and the poor get it all for free. Eventually CA will not have a middle class.

Last edited by volosong; 11-28-2016 at 10:21 PM.. Reason: inserted missing close quote hypertag
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Old 11-28-2016, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
30,989 posts, read 13,564,601 times
Reputation: 22078
Quote:
Originally Posted by lae60 View Post
The increase in the cost of registration of vehicles is paid for by them...and it went up much more than inflation or their budgets. Again the rich can afford the fees, and the poorest do not register and insure their vehicles anyway.
The vehicle registration fee is going up $10 in 2017 I'm not aware of any other recent DMV fee increases. In any case, DMV fees are cheaper in California than in Nevada for cars with a value of over $500 because in Nevada the DMV depreciates cars less than in California.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lae60 View Post
The rural area fire 'fee' which is nothing but a tax is paid by them. People on assisted housing are not affected by the increase in rent--their payment is controlled by their assistance benefits. And the rich are not living in these rural areas.
I understand that a fire fee is a burden to people living in rural areas, but to be fair, should the entire state pay for the increased fire fighting costs for people who voluntarily live in those areas? It's kind of like people living in flood zones, I don't think the extra cost for their insurance should be borne by the entire population of the state, where you live is a choice..no one forces anyone to live in a particular place.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lae60 View Post
And there are hundreds more of these types of taxes/tax like fees.
I understand that, but there are fees and taxes in every state. I think the article was referring to the high income tax rate in California that does not impact anyone except high wage earners. Other than income taxes I don't think California taxes & fees are much different than other states
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Old 11-29-2016, 01:00 AM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
Reputation: 20397
My friends in Oregon pay a one time fee of $66 for permanent Antique registration and plates...

In California I pay about $100 minimum with some like the 61 Corvette being several hundred more...

At current rates it would cost me at least $1000 for ten years in California and $66 in Oregon...

Other States have similar fee structures... $20 for vehicles 30 years older and under 2850 lbs and $25 if over.

Also, California has just about every tax/fee known... not so for neighboring States... no Income Tax in Washington, Nevada, etc or no Sales Tax in Oregon are huge differences on their own.

Simply the difference in a 10% Sales Tax vs no Sales Tax is humongous....

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 11-29-2016 at 01:30 AM..
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Old 11-29-2016, 02:07 AM
 
715 posts, read 287,412 times
Reputation: 1043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goin' Coastal View Post
We get a little tired of the sun by September or October, so we head to OR and WA to visit friends
and enjoy their rain and greenery. However, after 10 days or so, we're ready to head back south.
I worked the boom years of Silicon Valley, but 6 years before retirement my company closed the plant and I transferred to Portland, commuting on weekends back to the bay area. I soon found out why everyone in the NW brags about their great summers (which they are btw), it's due to the great contrast between the other nine months of almost constant cloud cover that I found so depressing. But you do learn new weather terms like, "sun break"!

While everyone will constantly remind you of how nice and green it is, they'll never mention the other color that dominates for most of the year, grey.

Green and grey are nice colors, but my favorite is blue...
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Old 11-29-2016, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Western Asia
3,187 posts, read 1,440,670 times
Reputation: 2524
Quote:
Originally Posted by sd-bound View Post
I worked the boom years of Silicon Valley, but 6 years before retirement my company closed the plant and I transferred to Portland, commuting on weekends back to the bay area. I soon found out why everyone in the NW brags about their great summers (which they are btw), it's due to the great contrast between the other nine months of almost constant cloud cover that I found so depressing. But you do learn new weather terms like, "sun break"!

While everyone will constantly remind you of how nice and green it is, they'll never mention the other color that dominates for most of the year, grey.

Green and grey are nice colors, but my favorite is blue...

As a long-time resident of Portland & Seattle, I can't argue against anything you said. The "sun breaks" I like are the ones we take to Phoenix or the Spanish Mediterranean in the winter. But I'll take whatever sun break I can get in the PNW winter.


California has some great areas as long as you can afford it.
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