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Old 03-05-2008, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,181,210 times
Reputation: 2731

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
Somewhere along the way, our society fell into the black hole of convenience. In doing so, we lost the knowledge to sew, to cook from scratch, to plant a sustainable garden, to preserve the produce those gardens grew and to have fun without something electronic in front of us.

Put the blame where the blame belongs. It is not on the rising cost of groceries or gas. The blame rests solely with each individual. Everyone needs to assess himself, his consequences, his options and where he is headed. It's true that you might die in the next tornado, or the next hurricane or the next earthquake. But that doesn't mean you don't look beyond the next calamity and prepare for something more permanent - such as old age.

Your future is in your hands. It always has been. That isn't new. But somewhere along the path of public education, that seems to get blurred or ignored. I'm not sure why that isn't more thoroughly taught. But until it is, we are going to have to endure people who say, "but I thought..." when they are in their late 30's or 40's. And, somewhere along the line, folks seem to think that the government is going to keep all the citizens of the country afloat financially. That isn't going to happen, either. The money that you put into social security with each paycheck is not earmarked for you; it is put toward the checks going out to those who have already retired or become disabled and can't work. You are helping to support them. If you were born after 1950, there will be nohting there when you reach retirement age. George W. Bush made that proclamation to the nation years ago. That's yesterday's news. I guess there were a whole lot of people who missed it.

And health care? Only the biggest and most successful corporations - that are still operating on American soil - offer a benefits and retirement package. Some offer continued health coverage for a price and that price is often the total amount of your pension check. It's the tradeoff. You decide which you need most - health care or money. Before you tell me I am full of crap, send me a DM and I'll give you the name of the corporation that does that.

So what are the options for retirement? There are a few. You have to think outside the box. If you really can't work all your life or there are circumstances which limit your abilities, you really need to think about options for making money after you can no longer work for someone else. Still, that doesn't help with the health care issue. If my condition gets worse or another crops up or cancer finds me, I'll be in the same boat others have been in when the sea got rough. Having said that, there are options for health care that I have chosen not to explore. It's a choice many of us have to make.

If you know the company you work for doesn't offer any benefits, then you are ahead of the game. How long can you afford to work there without benefits? How much of a risk are taking? You have a husband or a wife that has a good job or a career, so your money is just mad money? That only works as long as you are married or your spouse can continue to work.

At what point do you take responsiblity for yourself and your future? It can be done, but if you don't know how, then now is a real good time to find out and make the a plan. Be part of the solution rather than part of the problem. That solution involves everyone being responsible for themselves and their future.
The way you say it, it sounds like poverty is dirty and nasty. Perhaps you could help me out and tell me how you define "poverty." My income is well below the poverty line and I have more than I need. So I guess it's all about what each of us feels we "need" to live comfortably. Oh, and I am very comfortable.
Excellent post!

-Renting vs owning a home is huge. Kids should learn the difference between the two very early on. You should learn it in middle school or highschool. There are huge ramifications for the two.

They both work, there's nothing necessarily wrong with either. You can rent at some stages of life and be fine financially. But there's such a stark contrast between the two at the finish line, at 55, 60, 65.

I know a woman that has rented her whole life, moved around in the same general area (a radius of 20 or 30 miles) literally 10 or 12 times. Sometimes changing apartments in the same complex.

You figure it cost $500, $1,000 each time she's moved (I don't know, just guessing).

In the end she's spent $7,500-$10,000 in moving costs, no equity, no asset, no improvements. She's otherwise very smart, but ended up with zero in the column under housing.

Then there's other people that buy a house (or land) early, stay there. Then by the end who knows. You could sell out of a high priced market (ca or ny) and move to a cheaper state. Pocketing the difference. Or renting out your house. A million things.

-You also have to think out of the box a bit.

If you start working at 18 or 21, and retire at 65, you're going to live through many peaks and valleys, bubbles and recessions. If you saved your money, you could buy real estate when its down. You could get better at something on the side, aside from your job.

-I also agree, people have basically handed their retirement over to Fidelity, slick ads in Money Magazine, big box stores, the hand of government. All in the name of convenience. No reason why you can't cook from scratch, plant a garden, ignore all the ads on tv that make you think you have to have something.
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:15 AM
 
Location: New Orleans Louisiana
156 posts, read 352,137 times
Reputation: 215
Thanks to everyone who posted.
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Old 03-08-2008, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,692 posts, read 33,700,331 times
Reputation: 51914
Let me ask some retirees who have moved since they retired, how many of you pat yourselves on the back because you don't own a gas guzzler but decided to live miles away from the things you do on a regular basis instead of moving to the town where you do most of your retirement activities including shopping? I can't tell you the number of times I've read posts by retirees who don't care if they have to drive for 30 - 45 minutes or more to get to their basic needs or favorite activities but there they are, preaching to everybody else about being energy conscious.

How many of you bought a house that's far bigger than what you need in retirement because you could afford it, maybe because you moved to a cheaper state after selling your homes up north/out west but you are patting yourselves on the back because your 4 - 5 bedroom/3 bathroom house (with a heated pool) for the two of you has energy efficient light bulbs?

How many of you are snowbirds with 2 homes, one of which you have to run the heat even when you aren't there so the pipes don't freeze or you have a motor home or a boat or you jump on an airplane twice a year, but God forbid we drill for oil, put up windmills near the house you only live in for 6 months out of the year or gas goes up a nickel.

When fuel prices go up, are you the retirees that are going to be wagging your finger at SUV owners of all ages because I don't want to hear you preaching or whining about how much it costs to cool/heat your homes, run the pool pump or drive to the nearest mall/wal-mart/supermarket.

I don't care what anyone does, just don't be a whining preachy hypocrite.
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Old 03-08-2008, 01:37 PM
 
3,752 posts, read 9,606,989 times
Reputation: 7044
We considered commuting when we bought our house 5 blocks from my office and one mile from husbands. We are talking about retirement and have found an area with sidewalks to all shopping for five miles and most of what we need like food, coffee shop, drug store are within 3 blocks. This was a big big deal for us.

We dont want to have to get in a car and drive to everything and most of the housing areas require that.
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Old 03-08-2008, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,828,923 times
Reputation: 18992
Everyone's different, but the way I look at it it's smart to buy a retirement home near a few basic stores. Or, move into a retirement village that has a shuttle to the grocery store. It's not about saving energy, so much as the odds are high that one day you will not be able to drive anymore.
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Old 03-08-2008, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,462,974 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Let me ask some retirees who have moved since they retired, how many of you pat yourselves on the back because you don't own a gas guzzler but decided to live miles away from the things you do on a regular basis instead of moving to the town where you do most of your retirement activities including shopping?...
Our cars get 34 mpg and 20 mpg.

We live 12 miles from town, I go into town most often to sell my farm produce.

Most of my 'activities' are on my farm.

My wife decided that she wants to continue working part-time, so she drives the 34mpg car for her commuting to her job at a grocery store.

We heat our home with wood and peat, and we are developing two hydro-electric sites on our land.

Should oil go away entirely, I am thinking that we will be far better situated then most.
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Old 03-20-2008, 03:40 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,142,944 times
Reputation: 9518
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevK View Post
The rich and government employees will be able to retire. Same for many UNION workers. But if you are not rich, non union and not working for government, expect to die with your boots on.
You Sir, are very regretably correct.
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Old 03-20-2008, 04:04 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,142,944 times
Reputation: 9518
Quote:
Originally Posted by cousinsal View Post
You guys have absolutely no sympathy for anyone but yourselves. You have this big, self-righteous attitude about how YOU can retire because YOU did the right thing.

Well, look around you a little bit, folks!! SOME people cannot retire comfortably. If you can, consider yourself "above" many of us, which I guess you do already. How dare you talk about your fellow citizens in such a condescending way?

(And, I'm NOT talking about me - I'm talking about our fellow citizens.)
May I ask what you are getting at? Should we take from our savings and give them to those that have none? Or what?
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Old 03-20-2008, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,828,923 times
Reputation: 18992
The original question was "Is retirement going to become impossible." The answer is: of course not.

Many, if not most people retire because they're no longer able to work. This is not going to change. Sometimes they decide this on their own, sometimes this is decided for them. But people will find a way to stop working.

It may not be retirement as we know it today. It may not be what you are defining at this moment as being "comfortable." But I sincerely doubt that we will see thousands of elderly people dropping dead as they walk to their desks because it was "impossible" to stop working.
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Old 03-20-2008, 05:51 AM
 
3,752 posts, read 9,606,989 times
Reputation: 7044
Talking about government jobs. People for years have looked down on government workers because maybe they could make a lot more money on the outside. Well, I took my job just for the security. I gave up more money to get greater security. I may not make a big pension but I have a secure (hopefully) one and health insurance.

Just how many who looked down on my career choice now wish they had worked at a government job for all those years? I always tell college students that they may have to start at a lower salary, but there are promotion possibilities and great benefits and to weigh this against just a high salary.
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