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Old 04-01-2008, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 41,409,778 times
Reputation: 10958

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Living with THAT many people? Good way to get your stuff robbed...and there's really nothing you can say to prove WHO took your things, cash, purse, etc. Hard to trust "other people".

I've even questioned the wisdom of leaving my girlfriend alone in my house, while I went to a pay phone to call her a taxi home. Ouch.
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Old 04-01-2008, 11:04 AM
 
1,861 posts, read 3,025,556 times
Reputation: 559
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
Living with THAT many people? Good way to get your stuff robbed...and there's really nothing you can say to prove WHO took your things, cash, purse, etc. Hard to trust "other people".

I've even questioned the wisdom of leaving my girlfriend alone in my house, while I went to a pay phone to call her a taxi home. Ouch.
I think it used to be easier to trust people. I lived with 9 others in a big house during senior year in college, and it was fine.

However, I would not do it now - I would never, for example, find a roommate in the paper, like I used to do. I actually got a nice guy as a roommate once, and we're still friends. But, nowadays, I would NEVER do that.
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Old 04-01-2008, 11:34 AM
 
16,092 posts, read 36,591,693 times
Reputation: 6277
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I think you are right on target when you said "Lifestyle Choices that many would not or could not make"

I am surrounded by this everyday and it is not for me to judge.

I drove the same car I had in school for 20 years... it is a 1972 Plymouth Valiant that I bought for $800 dollars... It got to the point where the Chief Administrator of the Company where I was working as a Department Director called me into her office and asked if I was having financial troubles because I certainly could afford a nicer car... mind you there was nothing wrong with my car... no rust, good paint and in excellent condition... it's just over 30 years old. She said that it was embarrassing???

I then had to remind her that I keep an eye on the bottom line in my personal life as well as my professional life... to which her reply was that I certainly do!

For many financially successful people that I know... it was not an overnight success, but, rather the results of a 20 to 30 year effort coming together.

I just couldn't see myself at 19 or 25 driving a new SUV and spending $800 a month on the payments for 4 or 5 years plus the fuel when my 30 year old $800 car will get me to work just as well and at the end I would "Own" a vehicle worth very little.

A young couple asked me for advice a few years ago... they were looking at homes and some really nice ones... I suggested that they instead buy a tri-plex that I knew was for sale for less than the homes they were looking at.

They bought the triplex, moved into the worst unit and had the rent coming in from the other two to offset the mortgage. They did a nice rehab and moved into the bigger unit when their first child was born and now they are in the process of buying a very nice home...

Not only did this couple set up an Income Stream for life... they also have tremendous tax write-offs from the business end of operating rental property... Is this for everyone... probably not... but, it has worked out great for this young disciplined family and they are very optimistic about the future.

This is the way - I bought a duplex in 1983, rented it out and lived with my parents (I was 23-24) then later I moved into it -- bought another home every 2-3 years and now I have 13. I put nearly all of them on short notes, 5-7 years (killer payments) and now I am 50 and the last two will be paid off in 3 1/2 years. I have another one with 14 months left. The key was that I bought in an area I knew would come back and appreciate.

I had to make some sacrifices, always moving to the worst or most-trashed out house, doing without central air - or sometimes even adequate heat, dishwashers, washer and dryer, nice appliances (my tenants had those) etc.

I thank God for my Depression-era parents who taught me the value of a dollar. I have not had a completely ascetic life, I go on cheap air tickets (AA Netsavers i.e.) for mostly weekend vacations.

I drive a 1995 Ford F-150 pickup which was paid off in 1999. BTW it is the "Millionaire Next Door" vehicle of choice!

I can retire from 'the real job' at any time, but I think I will probably work until 55. Hey you can't ever have enough, right (BTW I am maxing out the 401k, have been for 20 years) ? The question is - when time grows shorter than your desire to work...
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Old 04-01-2008, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,692 posts, read 49,482,998 times
Reputation: 19136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
This is the way - I bought a duplex in 1983, rented it out and lived with my parents (I was 23-24) then later I moved into it -- bought another home every 2-3 years and now I have 13. I put nearly all of them on short notes, 5-7 years (killer payments) and now I am 50 and the last two will be paid off in 3 1/2 years. I have another one with 14 months left. The key was that I bought in an area I knew would come back and appreciate.

I had to make some sacrifices, always moving to the worst or most-trashed out house, doing without central air - or sometimes even adequate heat, dishwashers, washer and dryer, nice appliances (my tenants had those) etc.

I thank God for my Depression-era parents who taught me the value of a dollar. I have not had a completely ascetic life, I go on cheap air tickets (AA Netsavers i.e.) for mostly weekend vacations.

I drive a 1995 Ford F-150 pickup which was paid off in 1999. BTW it is the "Millionaire Next Door" vehicle of choice!

I can retire from 'the real job' at any time, but I think I will probably work until 55. Hey you can't ever have enough, right (BTW I am maxing out the 401k, have been for 20 years) ? The question is - when time grows shorter than your desire to work...
Nicely done.
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Old 04-01-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,413,364 times
Reputation: 24613

Yeah, some of us can have enough. The problem is that a job that once bought enough is no longer doing so. I too am tired of the smug folks that brag on this board. Like the kid that could live with his parents until he could “afford" to move into a house he undoubtedly bought with their money.

Some of us do not have parents that we could or would want to live with. I went into the military because the remains of my family could not support a college education and I would up learning a trade that has had a decreasing demand over the years although with the proper connections I suppose there might be a future demand for an over age Imperial Storm Trooper. There is very little demand for a machinist, welder and general metalworker. That is why I am a scientist specializing in environmental concerns. It remains interesting and pays the bills but not as well as before.

I have done reasonably well considering my background and personality. I learned to take care of my friends and destroy my enemies. I also learned to figure out which were which. I believe that continuous striving for more is a perversion taught to us in order to make us malleable to the employers that exploit this weakness.

I have known a couple of successful businessmen. One started with very little and became a successful entrepreneur. The other started with a large fortune and made it even larger. Both were relatively frugal and continued to strive for more and more. They could be trusted for advice but not for money because if the lent you any money they owned you. Both of these successful men died of stress related disease before they were 55. Their heirs have appreciated their consistent efforts. Sadly, they didn’t leave any of their fortune to me. At least I would have appreciated it.
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Old 04-01-2008, 01:14 PM
 
1,861 posts, read 3,025,556 times
Reputation: 559
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
Yeah, some of us can have enough. The problem is that a job that once bought enough is no longer doing so. I too am tired of the smug folks that brag on this board. Like the kid that could live with his parents until he could “afford" to move into a house he undoubtedly bought with their money.

Some of us do not have parents that we could or would want to live with. I went into the military because the remains of my family could not support a college education and I would up learning a trade that has had a decreasing demand over the years although with the proper connections I suppose there might be a future demand for an over age Imperial Storm Trooper. There is very little demand for a machinist, welder and general metalworker. That is why I am a scientist specializing in environmental concerns. It remains interesting and pays the bills but not as well as before.

I have done reasonably well considering my background and personality. I learned to take care of my friends and destroy my enemies. I also learned to figure out which were which. I believe that continuous striving for more is a perversion taught to us in order to make us malleable to the employers that exploit this weakness.

I have known a couple of successful businessmen. One started with very little and became a successful entrepreneur. The other started with a large fortune and made it even larger. Both were relatively frugal and continued to strive for more and more. They could be trusted for advice but not for money because if the lent you any money they owned you. Both of these successful men died of stress related disease before they were 55. Their heirs have appreciated their consistent efforts. Sadly, they didn’t leave any of their fortune to me. At least I would have appreciated it.
It's all dependent on a person's situation. I say, if you're doing well, more power to you; if not, I doubt it's totally your own fault.

Just the fact that real wages have plummeted and the fact that everything else has gone up in the last 35 years is a huge reason why people have tough times. And, as far as I'm concerned, that's fine. I understand - I get it. Some don't "get it" at all.

I do not blame the individual UNLESS I know darn well that they had a lot of money, and threw it out the window. That is NOT the situation for most of us. And, where people got that idea is beyond me.

When I first came to this board to discuss retirement, I thought that it would be a supportive environment for people who are facing retirement, perhaps with some issues (as most of us have), but there is too much one-upmanship going on.
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Old 04-01-2008, 02:59 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,344,141 times
Reputation: 20438
Quote:
Originally Posted by cousinsal
When I first came to this board to discuss retirement, I thought that it would be a supportive environment for people who are facing retirement, perhaps with some issues (as most of us have), but there is too much one-upmanship going on.
Don't give up Cousinsal... there are many more that read these posts as opposed to Posters and a lot of them are young and these discussions are invaluable.
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Old 04-01-2008, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,834,488 times
Reputation: 18992
Quote:
Originally Posted by cousinsal View Post
When I first came to this board to discuss retirement, I thought that it would be a supportive environment for people who are facing retirement, perhaps with some issues (as most of us have), but there is too much one-upmanship going on.
I'm sorry this board didn't turn out the way you were hoping.

I think most of the people who came to this forum sought it out because they are able to retire. Maybe that makes us an atypical group? I don't know, but my point is most people go to a retirement forum because they are planning a retirement (IMO). Just like people go to a pets forum because they have pets. Very few people go to a pets forum to discuss how they don't like animals or they don't believe anybody can afford to own pets in this time of economic insecurity.

The majority of regulars here believe it is possible to retire because a high percentage of us have, in fact, recently retired. Many of us came from modest means, but found a way to make it work. Therefore we like to share ideas and financial solutions... and this may be what you are interpreting as one upsmanship.

I can understand your frustration if you were hoping this would be a forum where everyone would sit around griping that retirement is impossible. As you can see, that wasn't a realistic hope. IMO, most people come to a site like City-data because they literally want data on various cities--in other words, they are looking for information on where to retire. And they enjoy sharing stories and getting information about the whole retirement experience.

I have enjoyed reading your posts and hope you stick around here--but I can also understand the desire to want to find a place where everyone thinks the same way you do. Maybe you would be happier with a financial support group forum? Or maybe city-data could create a "life stinks" forum--that would be a great place to hang out when you don't want to hear any more success stories or other happy blah blah blah. You'd find a lot of friends to commiserate on how difficult life is--seriously, I think this might be a very popular and useful forum. Sorta like hanging out at a neighborhood bar.

Last edited by normie; 04-01-2008 at 04:30 PM..
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Old 04-02-2008, 01:56 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,150,535 times
Reputation: 9518
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
maybe city-data could create a "life stinks" forum--that would be a great place to hang out when you don't want to hear any more success stories or other happy blah blah blah. You'd find a lot of friends to commiserate on how difficult life is--seriously, I think this might be a very popular and useful forum. Sorta like hanging out at a neighborhood bar.
I came to this forum because I assume most working class Americans are facing great difficulty in retirement and that some answers to seemingly intractable problems might be found here. But, like cousinsal, I find some smugness on the part of more fortunate people that irks me. I come asking real questions about real problems and have it suggested that if I am not able to retire it's simply my own fault. That's in no way helpful (if help was what was intended...). For those of you that have escaped the trap I say good for you and I am really happy that you have prospered! I would appreciate it however if you weren't so deprecatory and condescending to those of us that have not been so fortunate. The title of this thread is: "Is retirement going to become impossible?" not:"Tell us how well you are doing now that you've got it made!".

Last edited by Bideshi; 04-02-2008 at 02:36 AM..
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Old 04-02-2008, 02:08 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,150,535 times
Reputation: 9518
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
I've even questioned the wisdom of leaving my girlfriend alone in my house, while I went to a pay phone to call her a taxi home. Ouch.
Forgive me for intruding into what is only your business, but why are you continuing a relationship with someone you think can't trust?

Last edited by Bideshi; 04-02-2008 at 02:27 AM..
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