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Old 03-27-2010, 12:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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Although this was not the main point of her post, AliceT wrote the following about Social Security: If you were born after 1950, there will be nothing there when you reach retirement age." This is just not true. While the cash flow has just gone negative (or is about to), all that means is that the trust fund bonds will start to be redeemed in small amounts. And while this redemption will put a bit of extra strain on the general fund, it is a lie that Social Security is "broke" or "bankrupt".
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Old 03-27-2010, 09:37 AM
GLS
 
1,985 posts, read 4,846,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
........ it is a lie that Social Security is "broke" or "bankrupt".
The government will not let Social Security go broke until there are no longer a significant number of "elderly votes" to be bought.
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Old 03-27-2010, 05:02 PM
 
29,772 posts, read 34,856,103 times
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Originally Posted by GloryB View Post
Not very comforting is it?
Government and employer are already linked/intertwined the same thing when it comes to seniors. Before retiring they had a money flow from their employer and health care they provided on their own or through their employer. After 65 government steps in and becomes a cash flow and health care source. I would think seniors find having SS and Medicare comforting.
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Old 03-30-2010, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,012 posts, read 1,162,378 times
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We were never meant to retire, and social security was never intended to be lived off of. In ancient civilizations retirement was punishment. Work is the meaning of life. Aristotle pointed out that happiness is linked to activity both mental and physical. As for social security, when it was developed the average life expectancy was in the early sixties, so those that lived beyond that were rewarded. Today, many live into their 80's. Hence you have more people drawing but less to draw from.
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Old 03-30-2010, 02:31 PM
 
29,772 posts, read 34,856,103 times
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Originally Posted by supertrucker212 View Post
We were never meant to retire, and social security was never intended to be lived off of. In ancient civilizations retirement was punishment. Work is the meaning of life. Aristotle pointed out that happiness is linked to activity both mental and physical. As for social security, when it was developed the average life expectancy was in the early sixties, so those that lived beyond that were rewarded. Today, many live into their 80's. Hence you have more people drawing but less to draw from.
The History of Retirement, From Early Man to A.A.R.P. - NYTimes.com
In 1883, Chancellor Otto Von Bismarck of Germany had a problem. Marxists were threatening to take control of Europe. To help his countrymen resist their blandishments, Bismarck announced that he would pay a pension to any nonworking German over age 65. Bismarck was no dummy. Hardly anyone lived to be 65 at the time, given that penicillin would not be available for another half century. Bismarck not only co-opted the Marxists, but set the arbitrary world standard for the exact year at which old age begins and established the precedent that government should pay people for growing old.

The History of Retirement, From Early Man to A.A.R.P. - NYTimes.com
FACTORY REJECTS

Retirement came in very handy in the United States, where large numbers of aging factory workers were wandering around the Industrial Revolution, dropping things into the works, slowing down assembly lines, taking too many personal days and usurping the places of younger, more productive men with families to support. It was one thing when an occasional superannuated farmer leaned on his hoe in an agrarian culture -- a few bales of hay more or less didn't matter. But it was quite another when lots of old people caused great unemployment among younger workers by refusing to retire. The Great Depression made the situation even worse. It was a Darwinian sacrificial moment. Retirement was a necessary adaptation and everybody knew it, but the old guys were not going quietly. The toughest among them refused to quit, even when plant managers turned up the conveyor belts to Chaplinesque speeds.


The above is all from the article. It is a great read on the history of retirement. Hopefully you and others will enjoy it.
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Old 03-30-2010, 02:34 PM
 
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The History of Retirement, From Early Man to A.A.R.P. - NYTimes.com
By 1935, it became evident that the only way to get old people to stop working for pay was to pay them enough to stop working. A Californian, Francis Townsend, initiated a popular movement by proposing mandatory retirement at age 60. In exchange, the Government would pay pensions of up to $200 a month, an amount equivalent at the time to a full salary for a middle-income worker. Horrified at the prospect of Townsend's radical generosity, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed the Social Security Act of 1935, which made workers pay for their own old-age insurance.

Hmmm folks want us to work and then they don't want us to work. Maybe they just want us to disappear. Wait I got it and how to spin it. Young people if you want a job cough up the SS payroll tax so we can retire and you can have a job. That is the ransom fee.
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Old 03-30-2010, 03:27 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,227,512 times
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From the same article:
THE R WORD
In 1999, The American Association of Retired Persons, once the Welcome Wagon of retirement, dropped the word ''retired'' from its name and became The American Association of R****** Persons. This change was effected in recognition of a basic reality -- many of its members are not retired -- and in anticipation of the baby boomers' threat never to stop wearing Lycra, turn gray, stop carrying around bottled water or retire.
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Old 03-30-2010, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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Supertrucker212 has some good points, especially that "happiness is linked to activity both mental and physical" (modern science agrees with that by the way). But I wonder more about "work is the meaning of life". I agree that those who have meaningful work are extremely fortunate, and that doing something useful is profoundly fulfilling, but what about the people who have accepted a drudge job in order to provide for their families? For them retirement can be a wonderful opportunity, not to cease activity, but to go on to other, more enjoyable activities. I don't think Supertrucker212 is wrong per se, but one size does not fit all because we are all different and we find ourselves in very different circumstances.
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Old 03-31-2010, 12:52 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,901,398 times
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I agree that life has it satges. I for example never disliked my work and even reallt liked it the first 20 years. But my life changed and so did the interest in what I did. It became wrok because I always had the drive to do a good job.I thnik its like that with many. We move on in life and get other interest. I have firends that are a cabinet maker and one that owned a body shop. Both bascailly changed professions but still have the inetrest but the furnture maker makes what he wants and the body shop owner how works on rods for himself . Both still have full shops tho.Retirement doesn't eman you quit all work .
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