U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-29-2016, 06:39 AM
 
3,455 posts, read 2,323,199 times
Reputation: 6998

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by choff5 View Post
I don't think there is such a thing as a valuable stamp collection anymore. Coins are a different subject but believe me, there is no market for first day covers. We have so much of that and have looked at it's value and best value may be using it for postage now days.
Stamp collecting consists of much more than collecting first-day covers. There are still valuable stamps, but the problem is knowing which ones are valuable and which ones are not. Or if some of them would be worthwhile selling as a grouping, etc. When my FIL dies (lifetime stamp collector, in his mid-80s now), we will bring in a philatelic specialist to help us sort through it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-02-2016, 05:52 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,277 posts, read 4,856,239 times
Reputation: 21666
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
That is a real shame that your great-uncle did not make a will. I am still wondering how a medically fragile 97 year old could believe any doctor who said that he was going to live for 10 more years. It is pretty unusual to live to be 107 years old.

I have heard of similar situations where long time caregivers were promised compensation and since there was not a will the money went to a shirt-tail relation or an estranged family member leaving the caregiver absolutely nothing.

Because that's what he wanted to believe. I have found with the older Italians they considered it bad luck to make out a will, like it was going to "put the horns" on you as my family would say.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2016, 09:02 AM
 
197 posts, read 160,846 times
Reputation: 1122
When my mum passed away in the UK I went over for six weeks to clear and sell the house. I am an only child.
My daughter who lives in England had first pick of everything but she didn't take too much. Mum's sisters and friends had next pick. I carried back some small items for my other two US based kids. I gave her clothes, bedding and china to a local hospice charity outlet.

I threw away many garbage bags of stuff.

Mum had lived through WW2 in the UK where every single thing was saved for "salvage".So she was a bit of a hoarder and i understood that.She saved all greeting cards and letters from the family, rolls of string and balls of aluminum foil etc . Going through her personal special things was truly sad and difficult.I am now the proud owner of her WW2 ration cards, civil defense cards, my dad's Royal Artillery army documents from his vaccination cards for his service in India to his "demob" authorization.

This was the greatest generation and their experiences through the blitz and action on the home front in the UK affected the rest of their lives.

My life was made easier because her next door neighbor wanted to buy her house for his son and i included most of the furniture and appliances.

The lesson that I have taken away from this was that houses and furniture etc simply hold no intrinsic merit for me. Family heirlooms would be different, I acknowledge, for some. I live with the awareness that my stuff will end up being disposed of too and I am OK with that.

I confess to having seven large "special" boxes of items from my kid's childhood. I like to think that they value those and that might be all that gets saved.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2016, 11:06 AM
 
Location: equator
3,410 posts, read 1,524,633 times
Reputation: 8443
Quote:
Originally Posted by choff5 View Post
I don't think there is such a thing as a valuable stamp collection anymore. Coins are a different subject but believe me, there is no market for first day covers. We have so much of that and have looked at it's value and best value may be using it for postage now days.

There seems to be no market for silver, even. We tried to sell deceased MIL's silver service at pawn shops ("We buy GOLD") and no one would touch it. Weird.


My sister was living with my mother after dad died so she could take her time and photographed every picture and piece of furniture and sent it first to us siblings, then after no takers, to extended family. Very little was taken. She then had a yard sale and sold almost nothing so they came to the conclusion that that was not worth the effort. Everything was very old and outdated. Should have had Salvation Army or Goodwill take it all and avoid the yard sale. As I've read elsewhere, the younger generation wants nothing from the older in that dept. It was a hard job we were thankful she took on since we were in another state.

Parents had a living will after years of badgering by banker BIL. It made their property sale so much easier. No probate. But it is an effort to get that in place....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2016, 07:23 PM
 
14,256 posts, read 23,974,521 times
Reputation: 20043
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
Stamp collecting consists of much more than collecting first-day covers. There are still valuable stamps, but the problem is knowing which ones are valuable and which ones are not. Or if some of them would be worthwhile selling as a grouping, etc. When my FIL dies (lifetime stamp collector, in his mid-80s now), we will bring in a philatelic specialist to help us sort through it.

If you FIL has a significant collection, it would be better if he finds the expert to value the collection while he is still of sound mind and body. There are a lot of not so scrupulous people out there.

It also helps if the FIL has a couple tech-savvy grandchildren who like to work on Ebay and similar sites. A number of my friends work the auctions and there is a whole art to that craft. Very often, the less valuable well priced lots get crazy money and the better lots go for a bargain basement.

There is a market for first day covers ... if they are in excellent shape, have NO address, are well cached, and are not held together with tape and rubber bands. Several friends sell 5-10k per year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2016, 07:31 PM
 
14,256 posts, read 23,974,521 times
Reputation: 20043
Quote:
Originally Posted by choff5 View Post
I don't think there is such a thing as a valuable stamp collection anymore. Coins are a different subject but believe me, there is no market for first day covers. We have so much of that and have looked at it's value and best value may be using it for postage now days.

There is little market for the piles and piles of mint US stamps that Uncle Milton saved up in his high humidity attic as a source of income for his retirement.

There is little market for those "collector series" done by Franklin Mint and that ilk. There is little market for first day covers, especially ones that were "self produced" over the years.

On the other hand, there is a great market for pre-1940 US Classics, especially the Zeppelins and stamps that are in great condition as opposed to terribly hinged.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2016, 08:10 PM
 
1,185 posts, read 662,420 times
Reputation: 4104
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
There is little market for the piles and piles of mint US stamps that Uncle Milton saved up in his high humidity attic as a source of income for his retirement.

There is little market for those "collector series" done by Franklin Mint and that ilk. There is little market for first day covers, especially ones that were "self produced" over the years.

On the other hand, there is a great market for pre-1940 US Classics, especially the Zeppelins and stamps that are in great condition as opposed to terribly hinged.
This is exactly correct. We had two experts examine my dad's extensive stamp collection. Unless the stamp is pre-1942 or pre-1940 they are basically good for mailing use but that's about it.

Since one professor was a collector we got a few hundred dollars as the first covers were in such pristine shape, but he was not looking for a bargain price for resale. We just did not have the ability or room to transport and store the bulk of the collection. Broke my heart . . .

After cleaning out my parents' home, I learned a huge lesson. Give your valuables to your children if they have interest when you can explain their background and meaning. Nobody wants your upholstered furniture especially - we had to beg a sponsoring church to come and get it for a needy refugee community as we had no Salvation Army or Goodwill nearby.

This is a Pottery Barn, IKEA and Crate and Barrel generation. Most have little interest in Grandmother's solid cherry dresser from the 1940s. I am lucky I have a daughter who is into vintage, but most of my friends end up donating truly beautiful and well-made pieces.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2016, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,738,878 times
Reputation: 47257
Boomers often rebuffed when passing down heirlooms

Nobody wants our stuff we couldn't wait to get from our parents!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top