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Old 12-05-2016, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,366 posts, read 10,355,263 times
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There's none locally unless you count low income and then they're apartments. If a senior is used to their own home, this seems like a good compromise.

Zoning is mentioned every time tiny houses are mentioned. Yes, it's a consideration but it would also need to be considered if adding a mother-in-law's apartment.

Just another option for parents to think about.
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:34 AM
 
2,412 posts, read 1,325,408 times
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Yes, the article is vague, incomplete, inane and boring. Kind of a waste of space in my opinion. Nothing new there at all. Just a list of options that have existed for a long time - and which are applicable to just about anyone depending on their desired lifestyle. The article seems to be more a marketing effort, not an attempt to really inform people of anything new and exciting.


What have been traditionally known as Granny Flats (these have been around for eons) are now renamed as Pods. Same thing. In areas that allow these, they usually have only temporary connections for water and electricity, etc. and local regulations usually stipulate they be removed once the resident has 'vacated' but in any event you need to have family of some sort with sufficient property to locate them. Removing them has an issue for a firm that wants to sell more and more of them - because they are usually resold or 're-rented' (you can rent them - they don't always have to be purchased) so the article deliberately leaves out the 'temporary' hookup aspect and leaves one hanging about 'what to do with them' after they are no longer needed for the purpose first intended - grandma or grandpa.


Adding a medication dispenser to a 'tiny house' kitchen is a hilarious ploy to redirect sales of a 'hip' but rather limited housing option to yet another segment of the population. Add a dispenser but don't even mention that they will still leave ladders as the only way to get to and out of bed (with the 'bathroom' still on the main level)? Great innovative thinking!


Government programs and whole sectors of the economy have long found their niche in modifying existing homes so seniors can age in place, just as they also modify homes for the disabled (many of which feature items/renovations that are similar). What is new there? You can buy ramps, higher toilets, grab bars (at the drugstore even), or put in a bathroom on a main level where none existed before. Doesn't everyone know this already? What is new about this that makes it a trend?


I cannot think of a worse way to spend the rest of my life than to be restricted to interacting only with those my age or older, rather than the full spectrum of ages. Apparently though there are many who do want to isolate themselves in communities where only seniors help/interact with seniors. Clustering houses in communities so that can be accomplished is not a new thing either. Seniors complexes/apartment buildings .. not new .. not a trend - simply an option for people to consider according to their particular lifestyle or needs as they get older. We see people here every day discussing these things. Senior roommate services - again, nothing new. Mini-'homes for the aged' where 4 or 5 seniors live together - been done for many years and sure, it is an option for some but not 'new' at all.


I just see nothing new here - including the level of 'journalism' which has sunk very low these days. To each his/her own. Does anyone here really see anything new mentioned? Did it change or enhance your thinking in any way? If so .. what and how?
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:22 AM
 
13,323 posts, read 25,582,469 times
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Nope, and no.
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:54 AM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,752,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aery11 View Post
.....

I just see nothing new here - including the level of 'journalism' which has sunk very low these days. To each his/her own. Does anyone here really see anything new mentioned? Did it change or enhance your thinking in any way? If so .. what and how?
This is the part that I think is worth attention. I find it sad that journalism has sunken so low. It seems there are endless numbers of articles cranked out by 20 something writers who know nothing about their subjects and do not bother to do much, if any, research.
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Old 12-06-2016, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Close to an earthquake
890 posts, read 678,635 times
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Agreed with the comments several have made about this article and that would be true for most people who have some experience beyond what the young journalist composed. But let me tell you that there are many people who don't have a clue. They might just be starting their journey into gaining knowledge in this area, either for themselves or an aging parent. This article may have been just the thing that kick-started their effort to explore other sources of information, such as the sage wisdom often found here.
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Old 12-06-2016, 09:30 AM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,752,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borninsac View Post
Agreed with the comments several have made about this article and that would be true for most people who have some experience beyond what the young journalist composed. But let me tell you that there are many people who don't have a clue. They might just be starting their journey into gaining knowledge in this area, either for themselves or an aging parent. This article may have been just the thing that kick-started their effort to explore other sources of information, such as the sage wisdom often found here.
A well written article by someone who knows the subject matter and provides facts would be much more helpful. The worst I have seen are the financial articles which are just often misleading and incorrect.
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Old 12-09-2016, 07:39 PM
 
2,132 posts, read 1,008,336 times
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I've seen these "Granny pods" touted as The Solution to Housing the Elderly before.

Might as well stick granny in a dog cage in the basement as try to force her to live in one of these. Put down papers, who needs the toilet? Wash her down with a hose once in awhile. Make sure there's a floor drain down there.

This sort of thing should only be considered for temporary housing for single homeless people. Yet every effort to implement the tiny house paradigm for the homeless leads to bans and confiscations (they tow them and impound them and then the homeless person loses not only the "tiny house" but also whatever clothes and things they had stored in there). Because they are considered "inhumane" for homeless people who otherwise have to sleep on a park bench or under an overpass.

But its GREAT for Gramma!

Don't even try to stick me in one of those.

Also the cost of these is being ignored. They run 85k to 125k - the cost of a REAL house in most areas. They rent for $2,000 a month and up. Way way WAY more expensive than renting a 1 or 2 bedroom apartment in most of the USA. They're being pushed as an alternative to a nursing home, but they are no safer for an elderly person who needs a nursing home than a "regular" house or apartment. All the tech whizz-bangs (computer to remind you to take meds, installed cameras that can be monitored by a caregiver) can be installed in a REGULAR home at much much less expense.

They have other versions, one of which is designed to be set up inside a garage - so now you can hide granny in the garage. They use computer displays and a camera to simulate a window - assuming the granny-hider bothers to hook those up. I wonder where the toilet is supposed to flush to if you set one of these up in a garage. Or where power and water hookups are supposed to come from. Plus, granny is now exposed to automobile exhaust and fumes from stored paint, gasoline, and other junk in the garage. But of course granny should feel right at home amongst all the OTHER junk out there. And they are wired for wireless so caregivers don't even have to physically go out and see how gramma is doing, they can just spy on her via installed cameras and the internet. What a relief for caregivers to reduce the amount of actual human contact they are forced to have with icky old people!

Disgusting. Just disgusting. Sticking granny in one of these things is NOT the same as "aging in place".

Last edited by Pyewackette; 12-09-2016 at 07:48 PM..
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Old 12-10-2016, 07:41 AM
 
4,881 posts, read 4,857,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borninsac View Post
Agreed with the comments several have made about this article and that would be true for most people who have some experience beyond what the young journalist composed. But let me tell you that there are many people who don't have a clue. They might just be starting their journey into gaining knowledge in this area, either for themselves or an aging parent. This article may have been just the thing that kick-started their effort to explore other sources of information, such as the sage wisdom often found here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
A well written article by someone who knows the subject matter and provides facts would be much more helpful. The worst I have seen are the financial articles which are just often misleading and incorrect.
^^^ Kristen Hicks (copywriter, content marketer and blogger) giving generic advice. rme
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Old 12-10-2016, 08:11 AM
 
29,789 posts, read 34,889,516 times
Reputation: 11715
The article talks about multiple trends with tiny housing only being one. The other trends are all real and being built and I have seen, read about or visited and talked about. The trend I find interesting is one story living with multiple master bedroom and bath suites. Our current house is two story with first and second floor master suites and baths.

The second floor is very large and has its own screened in porch. Mom or dad could live downstairs with their children upstairs like any home without a first floor master. There are large planned communities that are not age restricted but are building different housing types clustered by neighborhood. One of the new neighborhoods has builders offering homes with many of the ideas in the article in mind.

With modifications and proximity to eventual assisted and nursing care facilities it is provably offering the villages and aging in place option.
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Old 12-10-2016, 08:50 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,871 posts, read 18,888,113 times
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One non trend that has always worked is the timeless "Cape" house. I've downsized and sold mine but my parents had one and an aunt had one. My grandmother had one room to herself in my aunt's cape--plus the run of the downstairs part of the house. The houses were two stories but it was possible for people to live downstairs and close off the upstairs or for the older person to have the downstairs bedroom. My cape house had a master br with two big closets, bathroom, kitchen, formal living room downstairs.

What's lacking around here are affordable apartments for older people. Even the low income apartments have years long waiting lists. All that's being built are apartments for $2500/month or very expensive condos. ($500,000 and up.)

I always thought age restricted mobile home parks would be nice but then you read about the downside to that too. Park owners selling the place out from under or raising the rent for the property even though the people own the actual homes. Yet I think I used to hear about nice mobile home parks in places like Florida. Somehow it seems to work there. Or not?
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