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Old 12-04-2016, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,316 posts, read 4,160,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I do now agree that experiences have more value than possessions. It's just hard to trash the treasures of our family's past.
I agree with that! I'm dreading the day my elderly parents pass and I'm forced to clear out yheir house. Even if I wanted all the various family heirlooms, I simply have no place to put them!

(And I think that's another part of the problem: with smaller family sizes and people living longer, often there's simply no younger relative starting out who could actually use any of the practical stuff from a deceased elderly family member's estate. I have no kids to pass anything on to, and in late middle age I'm hardly going to dispose of my own carefully chosen furnishings to replace them with my parents' things! So what's to become of their belongings? It seems an estate sale will be a necessity.)
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Old 12-04-2016, 12:22 PM
 
659 posts, read 352,476 times
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I've had a bunch of old Wedgewood china that I inherited packed away in a box in the garage for decades and never really used it. So out of curiosity, I priced it on Replacements, eBay. Well on eBay, they were practically giving it away. Replacements had the pattern dinner plate at $40. But I'm sure I'd get very little selling it to them. So, looks like everyone is right, old china is dirt cheap these days. I find that so sad. So much if it is exquisite and from a bygone era when socializing meant something very different than today. People actually sat down together and enjoyed a formal, multi-course meal for entertainment and as a way to maintain social contacts.

So what to do with all this lovely, old, Wedgewood china? I have a set of Doulton & Co. everyday china that I love and have used for 20 years. I don't do formal dinner parties, so have never really found a way to use this sweet, old Wedgewood.

But I really can't bring myself to get rid of it. I mean, it's so old it's actual History by now! And it's beautiful. I think of all the wonderful meals it's served to so many through the years - Christmas, Thanksgiving, special family gatherings. Sad to think of giving it up.

So I'm not giving it to Goodwill. Too much trouble to pack it up and ship on eBay. So I decided to unpack it and actually use it! I have most of the set in the cabinet next to the Doulton. Might as well enjoy it. And since its not worth much, I won't worry anymore about breaking it. I'm using some of the demitasse cups & sauces as tea candle holders, and it's actually pretty cute. Still stored in the garage are numerous coffee cup, demitasse cups and saucers. I will never use those.

I'm definitely NOT a packrat and don't hang on to things that I cant find a use for. I think this fine, old Wedgewood china is just going to have to be the one exception to my rule. I think I can live with that.
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Old 12-04-2016, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Lake Norman, NC
7,185 posts, read 11,229,995 times
Reputation: 30752
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
As people have already said, there isn't much of a demand anymore. They don't want antiques, silver, china--all the things we cherished, the things we inherited or received as wedding gifts. It's kind of sad.
Adding to the list that the younger generation doesn't want, you can put Hummel's, Grandfather clocks, Royal Doulton, Wedgewood, Capidimonte, etc.

We struggled with what to do with my parents stuff when they passed. We kept some (but we have tight storage space) and we let a whole bunch of items go to the estate sale. Sentimental value is obviously worth nothing to strangers so it hurt, but it had to be done.
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Old 12-04-2016, 01:06 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,432 posts, read 1,668,181 times
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My siblings and I are going through this currently with my Dad passing and Mom in assisted living. None of us have room or want things and I was very conflicted and feeling disloyal somehow. I thought through it and realized we were worrying about things and had to disconnect them from the people. Those things aren't my Mom or Dad. They loved their things and I'm glad they got to live a life they loved. That life is in the past now and keeping things won't bring it back or keep it alive. They wouldn't want to burden us with unneeded or unwanted things, no matter if they or others thought they were heirloom or special.

My Mom put their 12 setting china set into use when she realized it was taking up space years ago and they were in need of new dishes. They put it through the dishwasher with the gold trim and while it may have dulled it, it didn't ruin them. She loved using that set rather than having it hidden away. That's a good attitude to have.

The Downsizing thread here has kept going for good reason: too many things are a real problem. Be it Beanie Babies or Lennox China, the old adage one man's trash is another's treasure, has turned into it's all trash to many.

Last edited by jean_ji; 12-04-2016 at 01:29 PM..
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Old 12-04-2016, 01:29 PM
 
1,187 posts, read 663,894 times
Reputation: 4119
Quote:
Originally Posted by BijouBaby View Post
I've had a bunch of old Wedgewood china that I inherited packed away in a box in the garage for decades and never really used it. So out of curiosity, I priced it on Replacements, eBay. Well on eBay, they were practically giving it away. Replacements had the pattern dinner plate at $40. But I'm sure I'd get very little selling it to them. So, looks like everyone is right, old china is dirt cheap these days. I find that so sad. So much if it is exquisite and from a bygone era when socializing meant something very different than today. People actually sat down together and enjoyed a formal, multi-course meal for entertainment and as a way to maintain social contacts.

So what to do with all this lovely, old, Wedgewood china? I have a set of Doulton & Co. everyday china that I love and have used for 20 years. I don't do formal dinner parties, so have never really found a way to use this sweet, old Wedgewood.

But I really can't bring myself to get rid of it. I mean, it's so old it's actual History by now! And it's beautiful. I think of all the wonderful meals it's served to so many through the years - Christmas, Thanksgiving, special family gatherings. Sad to think of giving it up.

So I'm not giving it to Goodwill. Too much trouble to pack it up and ship on eBay. So I decided to unpack it and actually use it! I have most of the set in the cabinet next to the Doulton. Might as well enjoy it. And since its not worth much, I won't worry anymore about breaking it. I'm using some of the demitasse cups & sauces as tea candle holders, and it's actually pretty cute. Still stored in the garage are numerous coffee cup, demitasse cups and saucers. I will never use those.

I'm definitely NOT a packrat and don't hang on to things that I cant find a use for. I think this fine, old Wedgewood china is just going to have to be the one exception to my rule. I think I can live with that.
Congratulations for using your "good" china! As you say, since you wouldn't get paid much for it, why not enjoy the set and not worry about breakage. The "kids" today want nothing they can't put in the dishwasher or microwave, plus they like a different style. Ours looks old-fashioned to them.

I have all my mother's china and etched crystal from the 1940s sitting in my hutch. It is so sweet and fragile. Her sterling flatware matches mine so at least that helps. That is on top of two china sets I already have - Haviland and Royal Doulton. I actually think I might pull it out and use it this Christmas. Last year it was so warm we had a casual Christmas dinner on the screened porch!

I, too, remember when holiday and company dinners were more of an event held in the formal dining room. It signaled something special to my children and they loved getting dressed up, fixing the tablecloth, making place setting cards and centerpieces (still have some). But I enjoy family get-togethers just as much if not more now in a more casual setting.

Just a change in the times, I guess, but I agree it is a little sad that things that were precious to our parents and us are no longer considered relevant . . .
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Old 12-04-2016, 01:29 PM
 
Location: NC
6,555 posts, read 7,977,981 times
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One thing I've noticed is that people hate to use the expensive stuff for everyday. One you get past that, or you buy it for cheap, you can happily throw it in the dishwasher. The metal glazes do cause sparking in the microwave though. I bought on CL a cute set of someones grandmother's china from the 1920's, just because it went with my kitchen as far as color. I use the plates and bowls every day (although no one drinks coffee from those tiny little cups any more). One day I might find a use for the serving bowls and pitcher. But probably not.
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Old 12-04-2016, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,656 posts, read 4,705,800 times
Reputation: 27983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
So enjoy your fancy things now, because there's no point in saving it for the younger generation. They don't want it, for good reasons. We're just being forced to recognize that no object has inherent value, that's all.
If you mean intrinsic value, sterling silver flatware and holloware does have it. It can always be sold for the metal content.

In every generation there are always those who value nostalgia or simply good design from a period not their own. Look at the people who collect mid-century modern.
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Old 12-04-2016, 05:46 PM
 
3,137 posts, read 1,822,942 times
Reputation: 5995
It is very difficult to sell china. I tried to sell my mother's china from her estate - she had a lot of patterns and pieces, some complete sets, some partial. It was all very old, some of it 1930s or earlier. However, the antique stores did NOT want it, and then I tried Craigslist, and listed several for months. Only a few sold. I sold some of it to a restaurant/tea room place. Expect it to take a very long time to sell, be patient, and be willing to accept less than what you want to get paid for it.


If they are complete sets they have a slightly better chance of selling, also if they are patterned. People won't buy solid white for some reason.
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Old 12-04-2016, 05:49 PM
 
3,137 posts, read 1,822,942 times
Reputation: 5995
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
Just my experience with Replacements, Limited.....

Before you send anything .... check each and every piece before you send it. I sent pristine items that they claimed were not perfect and paid me accordingly.

.

I had the same experience with a woman that I sold china to on Craigslist She claimed there was a chip on something, but there wasn't. She lied. She was trying to get me to give her a refund - I didn't. When I sold it to her, we took out each piece and inspected it together so she could see it wasn't damaged.


The fact is, people will lie.


I also didn't trust Replacements, Limited.
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Old 12-04-2016, 06:03 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,855,957 times
Reputation: 33746
I think I will break my niece's arm if she refuses to take my beloved blue and white Wedgwood queensware.

There is some intrinsic value to me--the feel of it, the look of it. A long time ago I even toured the old Wedgwood factory in England and I watched them put that relief decoration on by hand. You don't get that sort of craftsmanship anymore. I saw them hand painting designs on to china too.

I also love my Corelle that I bought around 1970. It won't break and it's dishwasher safe. But does it have that lightweight feel to it? That soft, sweet beauty? No. It's practical though.

And I did a horrible thing today. Stopped in at our local thrift store and they had a Westmoreland milk glass bud vase with the same hand painted rose decoration that's on the candy dish I bought new for my mother so long ago. I paid only $3.00 for the vase today. Paid $20 for the candy dish back around 1970 and that should be a lot more in today's money but it's not.

I've gotten rid of so much but it was a joy today to find that vase--and $3.00 won't break the bank. To top it off, when I got it home, I remembered that there were still some roses blooming in the back yard. Now the bud vase is sitting on the coffee table with a real rose--the way it's supposed to be. (Nyah nyah, milleniels--LOL. Thanks for hating our stuff. I wouldn't have this vase if you valued pretty things.)
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