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Old 12-04-2016, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,872,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Do you also use disposable pots and pans, kitchen knives, and cutting boards?

Or do you just eat pre-prepared food from plastic containers?
Of course we have those. But we also eat very simple, no elaborate dinners, instead things that are easy to prepare and cook. Doesn't take much for soups and salads, sandwiches, chili, etc either. Sure not going to waste time washing dishes. That's the best thing about retirement in not doing what you hate. Keep life simple and pleasant.
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Old 12-04-2016, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,630 posts, read 966,206 times
Reputation: 3804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
Interesting. We use cardboard plate, bowls, styrofoam cups, plastic forks and spoons only. And throw them away after eating. Forget washing dishes, this is much simpler and we've done it this way for many years. Don't have to worry about chipped or broken dishes either.
How disgustingly wasteful. Do you have grandchildren? How smug you are to leave them a planet of garbage.
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Old 12-04-2016, 11:57 PM
 
20,775 posts, read 13,763,409 times
Reputation: 14431
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
We are downsizing significantly and I'm finally getting rid of several boxes of beautiful but never used china. Some was purchased in Germany in the 50s by my mother and never used.
We live only 40 minutes from Replacements but their reviews are horrible. They are pretty stingy with purchase price.

E bay seems like a better choice but packing and shipping would be a real pain.
Have you sold china with good results? Where?

Sadly the world isn't what it was through the 1960's when households had and used fine china, crystal and silver. Today if it cannot go into the dishwasher it doesn't get used much if at all. Oh and forget about brides asking for various pieces of china, silver or crystal as wedding gifts. It has been ages since have seen anyone even register for such things.


Ebay, Esty, Craigslist, and various other online or even physical stores can be a crap shoot. Many are overloaded with things that aren't moving already which just brings down prices.


All this being said there are still those out there who use fine china, and enjoy doing so. Just how to find them is the problem.




How often do you use "Fine China?"


Breaking tradition / As fine china sales sag, casual dinnerware finds more room at the table | Lifestyle | lancasteronline.com
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Old 12-05-2016, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,950 posts, read 5,305,279 times
Reputation: 17977
Quote:
Originally Posted by clikrf8 View Post
How disgustingly wasteful. Do you have grandchildren? How smug you are to leave them a planet of garbage.
That's a lot of money over a lifetime. Not much water and electricity to do the dishes.
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:10 AM
 
Location: NC
6,561 posts, read 7,981,951 times
Reputation: 13465
I repeat from my earlier post. Just treat your old, fine China as if it were cheap, everyday stuff. Put it in the dishwasher. If it gets 'ruined' throw it out. Just enjoy the heck out of it. You will be surprised how long it lasts and how much fun it is to use, even with paper towels instead of napkins.
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,316 posts, read 4,162,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
I repeat from my earlier post. Just treat your old, fine China as if it were cheap, everyday stuff. Put it in the dishwasher. If it gets 'ruined' throw it out. Just enjoy the heck out of it.
That's definitely the way to go! And I was pleased to see when I read the first link that BugsyPal posted that a lot of people apparently are doing just that. After all, china has always been meant to be used!
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Old 12-05-2016, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,485 posts, read 43,777,962 times
Reputation: 47257
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
You probably nailed it. This love of china and silver hearkens back to the Victorian days when there were servants OR people wanted to be like the people who had servants. A utensil for every different type of food, detailed table manners that included which utensil to use and when. All the individual salt cellars and little bone dishes for each person's leftover bones.

That style was passed down to our parents who didn't go into such extreme detail but still liked the formal dinner style. And we must have been at the tail end. When I was married you registered your silver and china patterns so people would know what to buy for you. I did use all of it but not any more.

Those days will never come back. The super rich may want gorgeous dinnerware and have servants to care for it but most people no longer care or have the time. I MADE the time because that kind of dining was instilled in me. But it was stressful working and trying to keep up with days of olde when formal dining was all the rage and people had the time to live that way. Something has to give and it's the extras like the nice silver, china, furniture, etc. A few of them may decide that they want some of that. Some day in the future. But it will never be the norm like it was in our generation.
My mother had and used individual butter knives, shrimp cocktail forks, luncheon size and dinner sized silverware,ice tea spoons, demitasse spoons, soup spoons, individual salt and pepper for each place setting, and every serving piece you can imagine including jelly, cranberry sauce, meat forks, cake cutters, slotted spoons, pie server, etc. I have several of those big wooden boxes lined in felt with the sections for each kind of piece. I guess I could sell some of it to melt down for cash. or make wind chimes. I also have plated set my father got from saving box tops from cereal boxes.
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Old 12-05-2016, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,130 posts, read 45,653,323 times
Reputation: 61804
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
My mother had and used individual butter knives, shrimp cocktail forks, luncheon size and dinner sized silverware,ice tea spoons, demitasse spoons, soup spoons, individual salt and pepper for each place setting, and every serving piece you can imagine including jelly, cranberry sauce, meat forks, cake cutters, slotted spoons, pie server, etc. I have several of those big wooden boxes lined in felt with the sections for each kind of piece. I guess I could sell some of it to melt down for cash. or make wind chimes. I also have plated set my father got from saving box tops from cereal boxes.
If you truly want to part with your China, then before the holidays would have been an ideal time. Maybe it's not too late. I know there are young women who still value things, like a beautiful holiday table, who would love to buy your China if it was in the budget. Most nice antiques shops will sell sets of China.

Why not just use your sterling everyday? It does fine in the dishwasher (don't use a detergent with chlorine in it, which I learned the hard way). You can easily sell off the pieces you don't want on eBay. I just give any silverplate to Goodwill, because it is worthless.
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Old 12-05-2016, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,130 posts, read 45,653,323 times
Reputation: 61804
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
I repeat from my earlier post. Just treat your old, fine China as if it were cheap, everyday stuff. Put it in the dishwasher. If it gets 'ruined' throw it out. Just enjoy the heck out of it. You will be surprised how long it lasts and how much fun it is to use, even with paper towels instead of napkins.
I definitely agree with this approach. Why have something taking up space if you don't use it? But, I can't use my china in the microwave, so it is kind of impractical for everyday.
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Old 12-05-2016, 08:59 AM
 
3,137 posts, read 1,823,690 times
Reputation: 5995
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I suspect that in twenty or thirty years, many people who sold or gave away their parents' or grandparents' china will be regretting it, as little of those patterns will remain and they will become rare and desirable. .
I think so, too. A lot of that stuff doesn't last because it gets cracked or broken, so it will become even more rare as fewer pieces remain.


Also, people are crazy to not take the family silver. That stuff has real value.
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