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Old 12-12-2016, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
31,085 posts, read 13,614,329 times
Reputation: 22147

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
As usual msm doesn't understand difference in dollars today and future dollars. Cut means wake cut now, Wil cut is correct which means will cut in future. Huge difference but msm isn't smart enough to be honest but prefers partisan bashing to solutions. Partisan bashing rather than real solution to hard 'rebels ms created by the fed gov own ineptness.
I am not trying to make this partisan I posted a link to the actual bill, a link to the SS analysis of it, and an article from Mother Jones but I only used to try to illustrate that the 50k figure being used in this thread to refer to 50k in SS benefits was actually a figure that represented lifetime average earnings.

 
Old 12-12-2016, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
31,085 posts, read 13,614,329 times
Reputation: 22147
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisTK View Post
Can someone explain to me, a 19yo, the logic of raising retiring age due to life expectancy rising?

I get we're living longer lives, but that doesn't mean your bodies are working the same too. So can these older people even work at that age? It makes little sense to me when you know that peoples bodies can only take so much for so long.

I base this off of my grandmother. She only worked in a factory her entire life and her body is shot. She's not even 60 yet (had a kid young and her kid had me young). I watched her go from being able to playfully tickle me and shake me around to struggling with a flight of stairs to struggling just to stand up from sitting on the couch. That factory work took a heavy toll on her body, ruined her left arm (now she needs therapy just to get it to half what it was before), and left her with little because she was too young to retire but didn't qualify for workers comp.

So from watching her, and watching how older people become just less mobile and fast (as all my aunts and uncles are in their 50s), I see no real use to raising retiree age based on life expectancy when people just can't do as much as they could.
That is an excellent point and it doesn't get mentioned very often

"More precisely, the study shows that in the U.S., the richest 1 percent of men lives 14.6 years longer on average than the poorest 1 percent of men, while among women in those wealth percentiles, the difference is 10.1 years on average. This eye-opening gap is also growing rapidly: Over roughly the last 15 years, life expectancy increased by 2.34 years for men and 2.91 years for women who are among the top 5 percent of income earners in America, but by just 0.32 and 0.04 years for men and women in the bottom 5 percent of the income tables."
New study shows rich, poor have huge mortality gap in U.S. | MIT News
 
Old 12-12-2016, 11:44 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
That is an excellent point and it doesn't get mentioned very often

"More precisely, the study shows that in the U.S., the richest 1 percent of men lives 14.6 years longer on average than the poorest 1 percent of men, while among women in those wealth percentiles, the difference is 10.1 years on average. This eye-opening gap is also growing rapidly: Over roughly the last 15 years, life expectancy increased by 2.34 years for men and 2.91 years for women who are among the top 5 percent of income earners in America, but by just 0.32 and 0.04 years for men and women in the bottom 5 percent of the income tables."
New study shows rich, poor have huge mortality gap in U.S. | MIT News
Visit a quality CCRC especially a high end one and you can see how wealth impacts life expectancy with the fitness programs and health control and enhancement that is built in. These people will tell you how they have gotten better since moving in.
 
Old 12-12-2016, 11:54 AM
 
1,190 posts, read 664,663 times
Reputation: 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Visit a quality CCRC especially a high end one and you can see how wealth impacts life expectancy with the fitness programs and health control and enhancement that is built in. These people will tell you how they have gotten better since moving in.
I think you have a good point as having other people available to walk, swim and exercise with can make a difference. When you can grab a pal or join an activity group in the same complex and don't have to drive to another location for activities it can make a difference.

OTOH the "vibe" of various places can be a detriment if you run into a cliquey crowd and have a repeat of middle school. The happiest folks I know are in large enough CCRCs to have a large pool of interests and friendship possibilities.
 
Old 12-12-2016, 12:04 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,237 posts, read 6,340,776 times
Reputation: 9854
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
Did you find a source for that because this is what I posted:
Yes of the U.K. Pension website. Current law for people born after years 78. Page 4.
https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...-timetable.pdf
 
Old 12-12-2016, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,440 posts, read 2,766,106 times
Reputation: 16373
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Visit a quality CCRC especially a high end one and you can see how wealth impacts life expectancy with the fitness programs and health control and enhancement that is built in. These people will tell you how they have gotten better since moving in.
Add to that just plain being able to afford a doctor and medical procedures will extend your life. At my age, I've already decided that if I have cancer, it's not worth it to do anything. So treatment saves my life. Big whip. And then for the next 5 or 20 or 30 years, I'd have hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt hanging over my head. Who wants to live like that?

But obviously wealthy people aren't going to think like that.
 
Old 12-12-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,676 posts, read 3,248,729 times
Reputation: 11982
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Add to that just plain being able to afford a doctor and medical procedures will extend your life. At my age, I've already decided that if I have cancer, it's not worth it to do anything. So treatment saves my life. Big whip. And then for the next 5 or 20 or 30 years, I'd have hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt hanging over my head. Who wants to live like that?

But obviously wealthy people aren't going to think like that.
I agree with you. At 74 and very limited financially, if I should ever get the dreaded diagnosis of cancer or some other terminal disease, I'm going to forget the treatment, etc. Let me have whatever life left to enjoy the things I missed. Hopefully I can squeeze them in before checking out. And yes, I will have to charge it. Condemn me if you want to. I am past caring what anyone else thinks.
 
Old 12-12-2016, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Retired
648 posts, read 498,041 times
Reputation: 1057
Whoa, some cancers are very treatable - get treatment. Some are not, and then that is your choice to forego treatment.
 
Old 12-12-2016, 04:07 PM
 
3,567 posts, read 2,372,980 times
Reputation: 2729
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisTK View Post
Can someone explain to me, a 19yo, the logic of raising retiring age due to life expectancy rising?

I get we're living longer lives, but that doesn't mean your bodies are working the same too. So can these older people even work at that age? It makes little sense to me when you know that peoples bodies can only take so much for so long.

I base this off of my grandmother. She only worked in a factory her entire life and her body is shot. She's not even 60 yet (had a kid young and her kid had me young). I watched her go from being able to playfully tickle me and shake me around to struggling with a flight of stairs to struggling just to stand up from sitting on the couch. That factory work took a heavy toll on her body, ruined her left arm (now she needs therapy just to get it to half what it was before), and left her with little because she was too young to retire but didn't qualify for workers comp.

So from watching her, and watching how older people become just less mobile and fast (as all my aunts and uncles are in their 50s), I see no real use to raising retiree age based on life expectancy when people just can't do as much as they could.
The people who think raising the retirement age makes sense aren't factory workers, they're investment bankers and CEOs. They don't see any reason they can't work into their 70s if they want, so why can't everyone else?
 
Old 12-12-2016, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Add to that just plain being able to afford a doctor and medical procedures will extend your life. At my age, I've already decided that if I have cancer, it's not worth it to do anything. So treatment saves my life. Big whip. And then for the next 5 or 20 or 30 years, I'd have hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt hanging over my head. Who wants to live like that?

But obviously wealthy people aren't going to think like that.

I don't understand. Is there some reason you don't qualify for Medicare, or are you perhaps not 65 yet? Past age 65, Medicare pays for your medical expenses, so you're not going to have any debt.
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