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Old 01-02-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Colorado
154 posts, read 100,393 times
Reputation: 319

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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnd393 View Post
I am cursed with DIY skills to fix almost anything, do almost any aspect of a home improvement project, or repair our own cars. There is always more things to do than I want to do.
I have that curse myself and have largely trained myself to ignore it.
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Old 01-03-2017, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,451 posts, read 21,289,337 times
Reputation: 24301
With sanity not being any fun, what's so undesirable about going crazy? Don't we all want to have fun in our elderly years?

I observed some crazy-acting homeless man at an intersection the other day, and it gave me a thought, something to do in my retirement years, feign being crazy at intersections, just for fun!
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Old 01-03-2017, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,769,401 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
With sanity not being any fun, what's so undesirable about going crazy? Don't we all want to have fun in our elderly years?

I observed some crazy-acting homeless man at an intersection the other day, and it gave me a thought, something to do in my retirement years, feign being crazy at intersections, just for fun!
Now that's funny! A genuintely novel suggestion!
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Old 01-10-2017, 03:35 PM
 
2,132 posts, read 1,012,616 times
Reputation: 8673
I do all the things I wanted to do when I was working but didn't have time for.

I see more movies. I read more books. I knit, crochet, sew, work in my pottery. Gardening, both vegetable and decorative. I take naps when I feel like it and listen to the radio or recorded music.

I have time enough to attend sangha (think of it as Buddhist Bible studies). I can chase down every rabbit hole that interests me.

Surely you have interests outside of work. If not - your local senior center and city-sponsored rec programs will give you many opportunities to find some for free or cheap.
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Old 01-10-2017, 03:56 PM
 
13,054 posts, read 15,423,957 times
Reputation: 15309
Quote:
Originally Posted by froglipz View Post
When one spouse is retired and the other isn't, I have seen less than desirable outcomes. You are probably better off continuing working until your spouse can also retire.
Really? I'm looking forward to retiring 5 years before my husband does and having 5 years of days to myself to do as I please. What I plan to do is go through and do things I've wanted to do to the house but haven't had time, start working on genealogy, plant more flowers and vegetables and do more from scratch cooking than I have time for now. The thought of retiring at the same time is kind of depressing to me, because then I'll be trying to arrange my day to accommodate him. I'd like to do my own thing for 5 years first.
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Old 01-15-2017, 12:03 PM
 
7,964 posts, read 5,065,845 times
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The essence of the matter, is whether retirement is timely, voluntary, well-considered after good preparation... or not. The frenetically busy executive who exits employment with plaudits and elaborate farewell, may nevertheless feel bored, unoccupied and deprived of authority in retirement. But this feeling eventually passes. The younger executive who is forced-out for indiscretion, embezzlement or other corporate maneuvering, and finds himself in middle-age no longer employable and involuntarily retired, will react very differently to the idleness of non-work, even if the financial situation is acceptable, and there is no pecuniary imperative to work again.

We can find amusements and entertainments, meaningful vocations and so forth, if our minds are well-settled, if we retire in good time, with proper capstone to our careers. If suddenly forced out and "retired" involuntarily, the feelings and reactions, the plans and calculations, will be fraught and weighted by self-loathing and unsettling foreboding. It is then, that we are unable to occupy ourselves, productively or amusingly, and wonder how to pass the time, and how to await eventual death.

Indeed, we've seen several examples of people in middle age, from early 40s through 50s and early 60s, who found themselves "retired" after a career of some decades, contrary to their will. These are the cases where useful occupation in retirement is hard to find, even for creative and enterprising people - or perhaps, especially for such people.
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Old 01-15-2017, 04:35 PM
 
197 posts, read 161,337 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
The essence of the matter, is whether retirement is timely, voluntary, well-considered after good preparation... or not. The frenetically busy executive who exits employment with plaudits and elaborate farewell, may nevertheless feel bored, unoccupied and deprived of authority in retirement. But this feeling eventually passes. The younger executive who is forced-out for indiscretion, embezzlement or other corporate maneuvering, and finds himself in middle-age no longer employable and involuntarily retired, will react very differently to the idleness of non-work, even if the financial situation is acceptable, and there is no pecuniary imperative to work again.

We can find amusements and entertainments, meaningful vocations and so forth, if our minds are well-settled, if we retire in good time, with proper capstone to our careers. If suddenly forced out and "retired" involuntarily, the feelings and reactions, the plans and calculations, will be fraught and weighted by self-loathing and unsettling foreboding. It is then, that we are unable to occupy ourselves, productively or amusingly, and wonder how to pass the time, and how to await eventual death.

Indeed, we've seen several examples of people in middle age, from early 40s through 50s and early 60s, who found themselves "retired" after a career of some decades, contrary to their will. These are the cases where useful occupation in retirement is hard to find, even for creative and enterprising people - or perhaps, especially for such people.
I liked your comment about minds being well settled. How many of us have some feelings of guilt if we are not tangibly productive? Some people don't, of course, and hence the dichotomy of comments in threads such as this.
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Old 01-15-2017, 04:48 PM
 
5,432 posts, read 3,464,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
I liked your comment about minds being well settled. How many of us have some feelings of guilt if we are not tangibly productive? Some people don't, of course, and hence the dichotomy of comments in threads such as this.
I would think it would be a pretty heavy burden to have feelings of guilt when and if not "tangibly productive" in retirement. Huge amounts of time to try to fill with 'tangible productiveness'. Others can speak to this - I cannot, because I do not feel any impetus, requirement, or need to be productive in retirement. If I am at certain times, fine - but if not, that's fine too.

Feeling guilty is a wasted emotion pertaining to this. I'm thinking some people feel frustrated or useless or unfulfilled if not accomplishing things in retirement.
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Old 01-15-2017, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,704,584 times
Reputation: 35450
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I would think it would be a pretty heavy burden to have feelings of guilt when and if not "tangibly productive" in retirement. Huge amounts of time to try to fill with 'tangible productiveness'. Others can speak to this - I cannot, because I do not feel any impetus, requirement, or need to be productive in retirement. If I am at certain times, fine - but if not, that's fine too.

Feeling guilty is a wasted emotion pertaining to this. I'm thinking some people feel frustrated or useless or unfulfilled if not accomplishing things in retirement.
Totally agree. I couldn't have said it better.

As far as needing a "purpose" for getting up in the morning, I have two absolutes every day.

1. Have to pee

2. Have to feed the cat.

Then I see what happens from there.
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Old 01-15-2017, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
31,775 posts, read 20,055,678 times
Reputation: 45884
I feel guilt if I'm not productive. It's silly and....... non-productive.

I think it will go away when my husband retires this year.
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