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Old 12-17-2016, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I have never been a dog person. Until two years ago, we always had cats. The last one I was very attached to. She kept me company my second year of RV travel when my wife spent most of the time back East helping with the grandkids. It is a pain traveling with pets and even worse to try to have pet sitters for long periods of time. Plus both son in laws are allergic. No more pets.
We're talking about a trained dog coming in to be with a very sick person maybe once or twice a week. If you're that person, even if you're not a "dog person," you may well appreciate it. No one would bring a therapy dog to someone allergic. And that bedridden person is not traveling, most likely, lol.
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Old 12-17-2016, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,522 posts, read 8,765,146 times
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Volunteer to do something you like. I just volunteered to coach a local lacrosse club. I played from 1955-1968, and coached in the 90s and loved it. Why not; it's better than collecting and moving furniture for the Salvation Army with a bad back.
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Old 12-17-2016, 01:16 PM
 
542 posts, read 251,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
It is sad to think the highlight of the day is a visit from a dog. I hope I go before I get to that point in life. I am sure I could not stand to do therapy dog visits. That would be more sadness than I could take.
I take my dog on nursing home visits. Some of the residents enjoy the visits more than others, but the ones who do enjoy the visits like to reminisce about the dogs they have owned in the past.

As we grow older, it is good to find happiness and joy in the little pleasures in life. I hope that if I end up in a nursing home, there will be doggie visits to bring a little joy to my day.
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Old 12-17-2016, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,110 posts, read 22,968,690 times
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I was actually hoping to do dog therapy work with my dog when I first got her. She loves everyone and is such a happy presence. The problem with her, is that she jumps all over people and insists on licking their faces LOL. I've trained her not to do it to me most of the time, but she hasn't figured out that she shouldn't do it to other people. I did speak to a trainer and she said that's really hard to train at this stage. It's partly her breed, too, I think. She's a 23 pound rat terrier. I say she's really boing-gadie. Spring loaded.

I would love to get her involved in barn hunting and those types of dog events, but again, those things are far away from here.

I love hearing the wonderful things people are doing for humanity and our four-legged friends.
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Old 12-17-2016, 01:46 PM
 
16,019 posts, read 19,688,452 times
Reputation: 26200
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I was actually hoping to do dog therapy work with my dog when I first got her. She loves everyone and is such a happy presence. The problem with her, is that she jumps all over people and insists on licking their faces LOL. I've trained her not to do it to me most of the time, but she hasn't figured out that she shouldn't do it to other people. I did speak to a trainer and she said that's really hard to train at this stage. It's partly her breed, too, I think. She's a 23 pound rat terrier. I say she's really boing-gadie. Spring loaded.

I would love to get her involved in barn hunting and those types of dog events, but again, those things are far away from here.

I love hearing the wonderful things people are doing for humanity and our four-legged friends.
You should take her to visit and test her out. When I was a Director at a Nursing/Acute Care Facility, in a small rural town....if we found out a visitor had a dog out in their car we would literally beg them to bring them in.
You may be surprised at how well behaved your dog may be, I truly believe they sense these things and adjust themselves, I've seen it. My boxer, who was the dog love of my life use to adjust himself so nicely when my friend who had severe RA would come by to visit....He was so dainty around her, he just knew instinctively he should be, and she adored him for it.

Regardless, I strongly suggest that rather than give up on volunteering, adjust the type volunteer involvement. Go start visiting random folks who are at your local nursing home....even just sitting in the community room and playing checkers, or chit chatting would brighten someone's day so much. Your personality is so earthy and wise on this forum, I know that you would be a hit.
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Old 12-17-2016, 03:34 PM
 
2,288 posts, read 2,619,311 times
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Jan beat me to it. Going to visit folks in a convalescent home is Very rewarding. No boss, no set hours. Just think how you'd like to be stuck in a home and with no family, or has one but they don't visit. I asked at the desk which residents were alone in life, and they became a member of our family. We adopted 4.

Another one I loved was going to the humane society and having them tell us which dogs were docile. We'd bathe them and take them to every convalescent home we could fit into our day. I don't know if these groups still exist though. I had a very sweet and talented Pom named Tuffy I took also. He loved people but his talent was taking one of those big balls they keep in metal wire containers, and he'd hit it with his nose making it soar for as long as you let him. lol Gosh the folks loved watching him.

An easy needed service is calling to check daily on the elderly that live alone. Its scary thinking you could fall or die, and no one would know for ages. Offering rides would be wonderful!
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Old 12-17-2016, 04:29 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,842 posts, read 18,861,423 times
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Long before I was retired I used to read to a woman who was legally blind. She was very well educated and had retired from a high position at an exclusive college. I'm telling you that because her style of being read to was definitely NOT boring. She got letters from highly educated, influential people from all over the world and she received interesting newsletters from organizations that she belonged to. And, oh! The stories she told. (especially the ones about John Barrymore!)

As for the dogs in the nursing homes and hospitals, I almost did that too. I was walking through a hospital one time and there was a woman with such an adorable dog that you couldn't help but stop, bend down, and pet him. He looked like a big, long legged lamb. To my surprise, he was a therapy dog and the woman had taken a class with him so that the two of them could come and visit people. The dog has to be docile and under control and he gets some sort of certificate upon completing the class. What a wonderful thing to do--I don't think I quite have the courage to enter a hospital or a nursing home on a regular volunteer basis though. It would take some special kind of person.
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Old 12-17-2016, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,904 posts, read 6,119,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
You can be as generous in contributing to charities as you want. Remember that well known and well respected charity, The March of Dimes. It seems 90% of the money collected went to advertising and administration. There are now better regulations but still plenty of outright scams and abuses. Even when the charities are well run, the money is often not spent wisely.


At this time of year the big charity on every corner is the "Salvation Army". Does anyone really know much about the SA? I know it is an organization with highly defined religious beliefs. I support attempts at reason, not group beliefs. And what is the money used for? I believe it is to help the poor and homeless. We should support government programs to deal with need and poverty. It should not be something we do as a hit or miss charitable program.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I don't support religious groups or their causes no matter how noble they might seem. This is from Wikipedia:



The beliefs of the Salvation Army rest upon these eleven doctrines:[SIZE=2][21][/SIZE]
  1. We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments were given by inspiration of God, and that only they constitute the Divine rule of Christian faith and practice.
  2. We believe that there is only one God, who is infinitely perfect, the Creator, Preserver, and Governor of all things, and who is the only proper object of religious worship.
  3. We believe that there are three persons in the Godhead the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, undivided in essence and co-equal in power and glory.
  4. We believe that in the person of Jesus Christ the divine and human natures are united, so that he is truly and properly God and truly and properly man.
  5. We believe that our first parents were created in a state of innocence, but by their disobedience they lost their purity and happiness, and that in consequence of their fall all men have become sinners, totally depraved and as such are justly exposed to the wrath of God.
  6. We believe that the Lord Jesus Christ has, by his suffering and death, made an atonement for the whole world so that whosoever believeth in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ as the Messiah will may be saved.
  7. We believe that repentance towards God, faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, and regeneration by the Holy Spirit, are necessary to salvation.
  8. We believe that we are justified by grace through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and that he that believeth hath the witness in himself.
  9. We believe that continuance in a state of salvation depends upon continued obedient faith in Christ.
  10. We believe that it is the privilege of all believers to be wholly sanctified, and that their whole spirit and soul and body may be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  11. We believe in the immortality of the soul; in the resurrection of the body; in the general judgment at the end of the world; in the eternal happiness of the righteous; and in the endless punishment of the wicked.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I'm an atheist but I support the Salvation Army. I've seen the good work they do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rational1 View Post
Yeah, me too. There are two reasons why I support them:

1. They are not publicity-hungry, like, say, the Red Cross. Also no high-pay scandals that I know of.

2. My father said they did good work during WWII.
Re #2 here, my uncle was in WWII and he could not sing the praises of the SA enough. He said that after a battle, the SA would be up on the front lines with hot coffee and doughnuts, etc and the Red Cross would still be way behind the lines. The SA was great in assisting soldiers getting information from home or contacting relatives for soldiers who were fighting. I have heard many stories like that when I was younger and a lot of vets were still alive.


After Katrina, there was a brief comment in one of the local papers in NO about the SA being down in the 9th ward serving hot food from a food wagon before anyone else. Then, the RC came. But, that story didn't get much traction with other news org. because the RC is always requesting money for their "good works". The SA doesn't.


I have personally seen too much good they have done, quietly, to knock them in any way. Are they perfect ? Probably not. But I have not seen much ?, any, scandal written about them. Nor have I ever had anyone raise their religious beliefs to me that was from the SA.
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Old 12-17-2016, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,904 posts, read 6,119,429 times
Reputation: 6112
My favorite volunteer work is working with abused and neglected kids. I wanted to be a Guardian ad Litem but I knew I could not be objective and the cases would weigh too heavy on my heart. Now, I volunteer to do filing, etc, any menial task I can to help out and let the stronger folks represent the children. I have collected teddy bears to give to said children, read to them in the hospital, collect suitcases for kids in foster care so they don't have to use plastic bags for their few belongings. Bell ringer with the Sal. Army, I love that.


I still work and don't have a lot of extra time but I do what I can. I love the outdoors and did do some volunteering with the local Audobon chapter, bird counts, cleaning up around the clubhouse on donated property. The Sierra club met there, as well.


This was the best thread. I learned a lot and I appreciated all the helpful suggestions.
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Old 12-17-2016, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,658 posts, read 2,812,119 times
Reputation: 4436
I volunteered for my local Senior College operation. Its the kind of place where there are an excessive number of excessively educated people. I ran their Technology operation for the teachers. After about a year I realized that every other committee chair had people in their committee to help them, and that every other chair was given a spot on the board. I was required(unlike any other volunteer, board member, paid employee) to attend every function with technology equipment and even some of the classes to video tape them. I had to organize all the equipment and make sure that all the teachers had what they needed and knew how to use it. I had to order new disposables and plan ahead for bigger purchases, and lots more.

So I gave my notice---17 months in advance since I knew if would be hard to replace me. They initially made it clear that it would be no problem and that they could find nearly anyone to do it. 8 months later they realized that not one of their members wanted to do this. So they had a meeting with me. I told them that they had an excessively educated group and that they would need to put some stripes on the prospective person's arm or stars on their shoulder. I told them that they would need to give the person a permanent place on the board and a title such as Director of Technology, as well as a permanent place on the executive committee of the board, where the Director of Communications, and the Chair of the Curriculum committee sat. They said "No WAY, HOSAI". I said, " Well good luck then."

I stopped 17 months after my resignation. Its now 17 months after that. They still have found no one. And their response to this is to dump it all on their only paid employee---she may quit soon. Its sad, because I loved doing it, if they had only given me a title and some respect.

I had the same situation with another non-profit where I helped them set up a website, and an communication circumstance. Pretty soon they started treating me as if I was some kind of slave labor. I was getting no respect, so I quit. They thought that they could find someone quick for Free. Nope. They don't have anyone still. I enjoyed that too, but a little bit of respect would have kept me there. I wasn't their slave.

BTW, I was never in technology. I was a counseling psychologist who learned how to do this stuff to improve communication with people and about what I did.

My experience is that working in retirement for non-profits is that they expect that you are their slave, and that they treat you like a slave---not a real person with lots of skills that you will be happy to give out for free, and all you need is a just a wee bit of respect as payment. As long as what you do is menial labor, then its OK. But try to give them high level advice, even if its free, and clearly useful to them---still no respect.
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