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Old 12-15-2016, 09:29 PM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,519,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sydney123 View Post
When it's everyone "else" but you.... it's usually you who are the problem.


not really.


I have read many "where to retire" magazines over the years and there are some locations where, even though transplants love it there, warn that it may take a long time for outsiders to fit in.


I moved 10 miles to a different farm after marrying.
One day a guy at the barbershop in the next town asked my name.
He said he knew everyone in my area.


When I told him where I lived, he said " you must be the new guy on Joe X's farm"


I laughed and said........."you are right. I only bought it from Joe X 22 years ago "
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Old 12-15-2016, 09:49 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,830 posts, read 18,839,234 times
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I loved teaching ESL but when I moved away there wasn't a place to do it anymore. I guess I was kind of letting it take over my life anyway.
dh tried volunteering in the town thrift store but the woman in charge was a screwball and he just quit.


Then he worked in the food pantry for a while and loved that
Until they brought in prisoners and didn't need volunteers anymore. I don't think there are any more volunteer opportunities left here. He's supposed to help someone with their car but that's about it.
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Old 12-15-2016, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
31,004 posts, read 13,571,153 times
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In Nevada some of my friends and I started our own little 'charity' we helped young women with children find housing and jobs, we didn't always succeed but when we did it was so rewarding. I've taught ESL, volunteered at senior centers to teach folks how to use computers, and I've worked with habitat for humanity.

We moved two years ago so I haven't been particularly active in any organized volunteer activities since then, but I help a man who allows 6 homeless veterans to live in his home, I cook beans, stews and casseroles for them once or twice a week, and drive the men to their appointments. I also make up dollar store 'care' packages for homeless seniors and give out about 5 or 6 a week.
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Old 12-16-2016, 08:12 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,225 posts, read 14,924,345 times
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I'm so sorry your volunteer experiences haven't been good, NMSFM. My initial volunteering with a rescue organization turned into me resigning in a not-so-nice confrontation for the same reason as you - violation of state/irs regs concerning self-benefit of a board member. However, my animal rescue work has been truly a nice experience and I currently help with about 5 different rescues and some private efforts. I fill in where needed doing transports when I can, short-term fostering in emergencies; help with trapping for TNR; pay pull fees (from high kill shelters for rescue groups); and network to connect rescue organizations with animals in need.

I also make hats and blankets for children in hospitals. My newest is lapghans for children in wheelchairs.
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Old 12-16-2016, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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My own experience at transferring my professional skills to a nonprofit volunteer position did not go well. I had been an executive director and fundraiser in the arts and when I stopped working I volunteered at a local library (the "Friends"), which was going under financially. Everyone on the "board" (lol) was elderly and NOT interested in taking responsibility for the smallest tasks re: a fundraising plan or any events for donors or raising cash. They liked to show up at meetings with cookies and chat. They looked aghast when I presented a written annual plan for easy events and annual mail campaign. One crotchety old dame threatened to quit the board. The library director was afraid she was going to lose her old ladies, who liked to knit things to sell for a few dollars. I could see the writing on the wall and quit.
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Old 12-16-2016, 08:18 AM
 
6,762 posts, read 3,857,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theoldnorthstate View Post
Kinda with you on this but different situations. Living here was fine when I was working and raising my children I do like the place

But upon retirement finding like minds is a little difficult, my community is children and family oriented so even the county recreation offerings are child centric, and the churches tend to reach out to families. Most of my work friends retired and moved back home. And being a single female retiree hasn't fit in with some group dynamics

What has been nice is taking classes at the local college, fun classes I didn't take the first time through.

Bottom line to me is even a nice place may not be the right place. Communities have personalities. I am beginning to wonder if I shouldn't look for a 55+ community and maybe find more commonality

Anyway. Good luck
We had a similar experience re the child-centric character of our previous community. For example, the only time the public pool had adult swimming was 8-9pm T&Th. As much as we loved our home there, we are much happier and active in our 55+ community. I've never had as many friends and activities as I do now.
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Old 12-16-2016, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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PS: That said, when I was working I did have a wonderful coterie of retired women who came up to my office to help with bulk mailing. I was the one who provided coffee and cookies and everyone had a great time while stuffing envelopes.

My personal lesson is not to volunteer professional services. I'd rather stuff envelopes and eat cookies and chat.
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Old 12-16-2016, 08:28 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,049,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiverBird View Post
My own experience at transferring my professional skills to a nonprofit volunteer position did not go well. I had been an executive director and fundraiser in the arts and when I stopped working I volunteered at a local library (the "Friends"), which was going under financially. Everyone on the "board" (lol) was elderly and NOT interested in taking responsibility for the smallest tasks re: a fundraising plan or any events for donors or raising cash. They liked to show up at meetings with cookies and chat. They looked aghast when I presented a written annual plan for easy events and annual mail campaign. One crotchety old dame threatened to quit the board. The library director was afraid she was going to lose her old ladies, who liked to knit things to sell for a few dollars. I could see the writing on the wall and quit.
Lol. I quit the library thing also. Bunch of nuts that don't want you to change anything.

Now I do " hit it and quit it" type of volunteering.

One time things like help serve at a fundraiser.
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Old 12-16-2016, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,431,986 times
Reputation: 15678
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
My latest misadventure was with a local nonprofit that was being taken over by a small faction who were using the nonprofit for personal gain. Very much against the law (IRS, losing nonprofit 501(c)(3)status, etc.)...
Please consider reporting the local non-profit to the IRS, to your state tax authority, and to the Justice Department. They cannot investigate unless they know.

https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-pr...-organizations

https://www.irs.gov/uac/irs-complain...-organizations
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Old 12-16-2016, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,431,986 times
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I've had good success volunteering in a few areas:

1) Personally, I volunteer as a math tutor targeting 7th & 8th grade math. In my own humble opinion, 7th & 8th grade is about the point in the education process where students either make a left turn, saying "I hate math" or they make a right turn saying "math isn't so bad and it's kind of neat." I also have some opinions about the educational process for 7th and 8th graders who struggle with math: for some, pattern recognition just doesn't happen with the typical textbook approach of 3 sample problems worked out followed by homework. I've had success tutoring students where they need to see 5 or 10 problems worked out step-by-step in order for pattern recognition to set in.

2) We've volunteered at a ski resort. The ski resort is most definitely a for-profit enterprise, but they have volunteer positions available for hosts that we've found rewarding. Sometimes it is as simple as engaging the person next to you on a ski lift in conversation, pointing them to ski runs they might enjoy given their level of expertise. Other times its giving them restaurant recommendations in town, or guiding lost people back to civilization, etc. Other times it is standing in the plaza directing harried families to the restroom, the locker rooms, child care, ski school, rental facilities etc. Our using walkie-talkies to call in the ski patrol first-responders when someone is hurt. In return for volunteering at least 1 day/week for the season, we're given ski passes. So technically we receive in-kind compensation in return for our efforts, but this is something we would do regardless. We find it fun.

3) We've traveled out-of-state to volunteer at major film festivals around the country. We volunteer in operations, and it supports independent film-making.

4) We've volunteered at a food bank a couple times each year.
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