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Old 12-22-2016, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,037 posts, read 54,537,410 times
Reputation: 66388

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Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
Thank you. Every day I have to remind myself that, in reality I should not have survived the accident as my car was thrown into a steel barrier. Sometimes I get angry that the person who hit me ran a red light and crashed me into that barrier. So, I try to be thankful I survived.
I think your occasional anger is perfectly understandable. It changed your life.
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Old 12-22-2016, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,969 posts, read 3,455,934 times
Reputation: 10489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I think your occasional anger is perfectly understandable. It changed your life.
It certainly did. I had to have an operation on my back to release a pinched nerve. It took me over 6 months to even be able to change bed sheets & a year after that to be able to walk to the little store- which was a victory.

The year before the accident I was remodeling my house, carrying in wall board & putting it up. So many things I was doing.

That's why I have to keep reminding myself that I we luckey to survive.

But I would work if I could & have respect for those that work with a disability. I currently live on 1/4th of what I made while working. Thankfully I have an investment account I can use if/when I need it, but if I didn't it would be really tough to live on just SSDI.
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Old 12-23-2016, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,697 posts, read 8,480,076 times
Reputation: 29386
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilnewbie View Post
Most of the SSDI nowadays are fraudulent... these same people are the old welfare queens... they took welfare for life and when welfare was reformed, they jump over to SSDI... the secret to SSDI is to apply so many times until you are in and once you are in, you are in for life... it needs to be reformed...
And you know this how? So much judgment and no facts to back it up, right? I'm on SSDI, and I assure you, it's not easy to get. Plus you are not necessarily on it for life once you get it. You are subject to review periodically, and I just underwent a thorough review after being on it four years. They got all my medical records from my five doctors and sent me two sets of forms, one 8 pages long and one 15 pages long to fill out. If I refused to completely fill it out, they would stop my benefits. If I didn't provide proof that I was still disabled to their satisfaction, they would stop my benefits. About 80%+ of people who apply are denied and applying repeatedly doesn't increase your chances of receiving it either. So many outsiders say "So and so I know gets disability money and they aren't disabled. I KNOW they aren't because they don't LOOK like it to me."

But they're not doctors. They don't know the person's medical history so they are in no position to judge. Most disabilities are invisible. Most disabled people aren't amputees. We aren't in wheelchairs or use canes or crutches so you have no idea about what is wrong with us, and it's not your business anyway. So no, it's not easy to get and no, it's not easy to keep. People just like to say that because they like to judge, criticize, and demean others when they have no idea what they are talking about and don't know them. I would trade my 8 medicines a day and $1,130/month any day to get rid of my closed head injury I had 12 years ago and work and live the way I used to prior to disability. But it's not my choice. I believe it's not many recipients' preferences either.
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,037 posts, read 54,537,410 times
Reputation: 66388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
And you know this how? So much judgment and no facts to back it up, right? I'm on SSDI, and I assure you, it's not easy to get. Plus you are not necessarily on it for life once you get it. You are subject to review periodically, and I just underwent a thorough review after being on it four years. They got all my medical records from my five doctors and sent me two sets of forms, one 8 pages long and one 15 pages long to fill out. If I refused to completely fill it out, they would stop my benefits. If I didn't provide proof that I was still disabled to their satisfaction, they would stop my benefits. About 80%+ of people who apply are denied and applying repeatedly doesn't increase your chances of receiving it either. So many outsiders say "So and so I know gets disability money and they aren't disabled. I KNOW they aren't because they don't LOOK like it to me."

But they're not doctors. They don't know the person's medical history so they are in no position to judge. Most disabilities are invisible. Most disabled people aren't amputees. We aren't in wheelchairs or use canes or crutches so you have no idea about what is wrong with us, and it's not your business anyway. So no, it's not easy to get and no, it's not easy to keep. People just like to say that because they like to judge, criticize, and demean others when they have no idea what they are talking about and don't know them. I would trade my 8 medicines a day and $1,130/month any day to get rid of my closed head injury I had 12 years ago and work and live the way I used to prior to disability. But it's not my choice. I believe it's not many recipients' preferences either.
It doesn't matter if they are amputees. When handicapped spaces and license plates first appeared after the ADA, my father would get out of his car, walking on artificial legs, and people made remarks to him about how just anybody could get a handicapped plate. Yes, a-hole, he lost his legs fighting in a war to preserve your right to say any stupid thing that comes to your mind.

He was not on ssdi, of course.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,216,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
It doesn't matter if they are amputees. When handicapped spaces and license plates first appeared after the ADA, my father would get out of his car, walking on artificial legs, and people made remarks to him about how just anybody could get a handicapped plate. Yes, a-hole, he lost his legs fighting in a war to preserve your right to say any stupid thing that comes to your mind.

He was not on ssdi, of course.
Under the SSDI regulations, assuming your father had no other impairments, he would not have been eligible for Social Security disability benefits. Veterans benefits, yes, Social Security benefits, no.

Of course, that doesn't mean the people making comments about your father were not a-holes.
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Old 12-24-2016, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,037 posts, read 54,537,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
Under the SSDI regulations, assuming your father had no other impairments, he would not have been eligible for Social Security disability benefits. Veterans benefits, yes, Social Security benefits, no.

Of course, that doesn't mean the people making comments about your father were not a-holes.
That's what I said. Not ssdi. He had 100% service-related disability. I specifically noted that because it is off from the topic.
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Old 12-25-2016, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,216,058 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
That's what I said. Not ssdi. He had 100% service-related disability. I specifically noted that because it is off from the topic.
Oops. I thought you were implying that your father was eligible for SSDI but decided not to collect. My nephew is also collecting a substantial amount of service-related disability benefits (duty in Afghanistan) but is also working full time as a teacher.
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Old 12-25-2016, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
31,024 posts, read 13,578,167 times
Reputation: 22112
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
Oops. I thought you were implying that your father was eligible for SSDI but decided not to collect. My nephew is also collecting a substantial amount of service-related disability benefits (duty in Afghanistan) but is also working full time as a teacher.
I thought that too... My uncle was rated 100% disabled from his service in Vietnam and worked full time in a brewery until he retired from there with a pension.
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Old 12-26-2016, 06:02 AM
 
2,443 posts, read 2,070,283 times
Reputation: 5690
Veterans should get first shot at disability way before civilians that are depressed, alcoholics or just plain ol don't want to work anymore.
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Old 12-26-2016, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,037 posts, read 54,537,410 times
Reputation: 66388
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
Oops. I thought you were implying that your father was eligible for SSDI but decided not to collect. My nephew is also collecting a substantial amount of service-related disability benefits (duty in Afghanistan) but is also working full time as a teacher.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
I thought that too... My uncle was rated 100% disabled from his service in Vietnam and worked full time in a brewery until he retired from there with a pension.
Ok, no. I just realized it was a bit OT so I added that. Sorry for the confusion. My dad had been an electrician before the war. After he lost his legs he went back to school on the GI bill and became an electrical engineer. He worked at one company until retirement from there, then a few years at another small engineering firm, played around with real estate for a bit, then spent the rest of his life volunteering with various veterans' organizations. My Mom still gets his service disability pension as his widow.

I grew up in a house designed for a handicapped person, built in 1957, decades before there was an ADA!
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