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Old 12-29-2016, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,754,934 times
Reputation: 47257

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People are getting emails that pretend to be from the SSA with the subject line "Get Protected," according to the Federal Trade Commission.

The gist of the e-mail is that the government is offering to protect your personal info and prevent people from stealing your identity.

The text in the body of the email may mention the Safe Act of 2015, which gives it an air of legitimacy. There is also a link you can click on to get the supposed protection being offered by the SSA.

But you know the drill by now: If you click on that link that supposedly takes you to the SSA site, a keylogger virus is downloaded on your computer that allows crooks to gather your personal info as you type.
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Old 12-29-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,844,519 times
Reputation: 6377
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
People are getting emails that pretend to be from the SSA with the subject line "Get Protected," according to the Federal Trade Commission.

The gist of the e-mail is that the government is offering to protect your personal info and prevent people from stealing your identity.

The text in the body of the email may mention the Safe Act of 2015, which gives it an air of legitimacy. There is also a link you can click on to get the supposed protection being offered by the SSA.

But you know the drill by now: If you click on that link that supposedly takes you to the SSA site, a keylogger virus is downloaded on your computer that allows crooks to gather your personal info as you type.

That is probably the most important thing to keep in mind. Those keylogger apps can really catch you. Keep a good virus software loaded and updated on your PC's
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Old 12-29-2016, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
Reputation: 27640
People always forget these phishing type scams.
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Old 12-29-2016, 06:27 PM
 
30,072 posts, read 47,320,143 times
Reputation: 16023
I would think many seniors getting those types of letters and tempted to respond are not very computer savvy
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Old 12-29-2016, 06:31 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
It's not computer savvy, it's mental degradation, it happens to most older people.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 12-29-2016 at 07:00 PM..
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Old 12-29-2016, 07:06 PM
 
957 posts, read 1,298,358 times
Reputation: 1309
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I'm s not computer savvy, it's mental degradation, it happens to most older people.
It happens to a lot of people not just seniors.

Fortunately, there are a lot of helpful tools out there. Google will often notify the searcher of known bad links. Various security companies (such as Symantec/Norton) have browser add-ons that will advise if a site is safe or not.

There are also some helpful search sites that will allow the user to check a suspicious link. Just paste the questionable link into their search box. Easy peasy.

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Old 12-29-2016, 10:26 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by ersatz View Post
It happens to a lot of people not just seniors.

Fortunately, there are a lot of helpful tools out there. Google will often notify the searcher of known bad links. Various security companies (such as Symantec/Norton) have browser add-ons that will advise if a site is safe or not.

There are also some helpful search sites that will allow the user to check a suspicious link. Just paste the questionable link into their search box. Easy peasy.

I believe this is phishing emails. I was trained not to click on them. Good info about the Google search.
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Old 12-30-2016, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,658,574 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I believe this is phishing emails. I was trained not to click on them. Good info about the Google search.
It is. I was phished twice many years ago with someone impersonating US Bank where I had my savings at the time.

The trick is to look carefully at what's in the email. If they ask too many questions be suspicious. I didn't know about pishing the first time and although the email looked really, really legit, it asked for information I didn't think should be asked for online from a bank. I called them and they said it was not from them but they report it to the FBI immediately.

This scam took in many people of all ages. I wasn't a senior citizen then so the crooks were hot just targeting seniors.

Now I know to look at the hyperlink to tell as to whether or not a website is legit but even then I read the content very thoroughly. I don't give out any information I don't think anyone needs to know.
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Old 12-30-2016, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,754,934 times
Reputation: 47257
I simply do not open any email from someone I don't know. Too risky just to open email. We also have excellent spam filter.
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Old 12-30-2016, 01:24 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,745 posts, read 7,027,781 times
Reputation: 14234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
It is. I was phished twice many years ago with someone impersonating US Bank where I had my savings at the time.

The trick is to look carefully at what's in the email. If they ask too many questions be suspicious. I didn't know about pishing the first time and although the email looked really, really legit, it asked for information I didn't think should be asked for online from a bank. I called them and they said it was not from them but they report it to the FBI immediately.

This scam took in many people of all ages. I wasn't a senior citizen then so the crooks were hot just targeting seniors.

Now I know to look at the hyperlink to tell as to whether or not a website is legit but even then I read the content very thoroughly. I don't give out any information I don't think anyone needs to know.

Another clue as to whether a site is legitimate or not is to look at the email address. A legitimate email from an organization will generally have the name of that organization in the email addressl address ( USBank.com, SS.gov; irs.gov; macys.com and so on). If you're getting emails from an entity trying to pass itself off as your bank, and you notice the address is from someone at a gmail, or yahoo account, it's not for real. Similarly, if you happen to open a link on that email, (not a good idea, but it happens sometimes), you may get to a page that looks authentically like the organization they claim to be, but the url will NOT be that of the real organization.

I got one of those phishing emails from an entity claiming to be from my bank, with a message that they were cutting online access to our accounts due to unauthorized attempts to access those accounts, and they instructed that I click on a link and sign in to verify my identity or some baloney like that. It all looked very real, even included the logo from the bank (which can easily be cut and pasted from any online bank site), but the email address and url wasn't even close to anything to those used by the bank. I just forwarded the whole thing to the bank (following phishing instructions on their site) for them to deal with.
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