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Old 01-03-2017, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
Definitely hanging in there! Looking forward to my six month 'anniversary'. Two weeks isn't very long but it's a good start!
Well, two weeks may well be the most difficult period, and thus a "long time". I do understand that the timelines vary a lot for different individuals. Please post in two more weeks and let us know if things seem easier at that time.
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,754,934 times
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I smoked from teens to about 28. So a little over 10 years and smoked hard--2 packs a day. I quit a few times only to start up again, especially during stressful times like grad school. When I met my husband he was a non smoker, non drinker. nothing prudy about him. He just didn't care for either one. It was relatively easy to abstain when I was with him. But before I met him I had quit for at least 1 year. Then my father suddenly died and I was called out of class. I lost it and somebody handed me a cigarette and by the next day I was back to 2 packs...after a full year off!

Once I got with my DH it was easier to completely quit but it took me several years actually to stop the craving after a good meal. Even now after 40 years of not smoking I say "Let me sit and smoke a cigarette" after we eat out because he likes to put his fork down and hop up from the table. I like to linger for a bit so that is his cue to slow down.
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: equator
3,432 posts, read 1,529,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
Definitely hanging in there! Looking forward to my six month 'anniversary'. Two weeks isn't very long but it's a good start!

Good for you AZ! I can't imagine how hard that must be. DH used to smoke in his younger days, then switched to chewing because "everyone else" was doing it on his mineral exploration job. Good thing I didn't know him then---that yuck is a deal-breaker. He talks about how hard it was to quit. I've never smoked but I can see it fills so many "gaps" in a day....


I don't judge that 'cause I'm a drinker and not all that moderately! I'm prepared to die early 'cause of it. I miss the physicality of my previous job and know I am sitting way too much. I need a bike, a Ping-Pong table and maybe a land-sailer like I used to have. Can't swim for exercise due to bad shoulders.


We walk 2 miles on the beach almost every day but that's about it for now. I need to get back to Pilates too, balance and flexibility are so important as we all know. Even the toilets here are so low, DH and I cannot get up from them without using our hands. And he's skinny and limber!

Last edited by Sand&Salt; 01-03-2017 at 09:37 AM.. Reason: added word
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,697 posts, read 8,480,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
I can identify with this. The problem with quitting is that you have to have a REAL desire and motivation to do so. I've tried, half heartedly, a few times but now I have some serious problems that have motivated me big time. I've been diagnosed with COPD, had pulmonary testing done and now it's "do or die" so I'm *doing*. It's only been two weeks but that's better than I have ever done. I'm using the patch and it helps a lot. Last time, which was this past April, I tried the lozenges and they just made me sick. I still have a bunch of those. The worst times are like at work at break time. What do I do now that I'm not going outside to smoke with my friends? I hang out INSIDE with other friends. I now take my lunch and eat in the break room. It's weird that I haven't desired one after I eat though. In fact it's been pretty easy for me all the way around. I keep waiting to get 'grouchy' etc. and it never happens. I have a LOT more energy and my attitude and mood is much better. I'm eating more too which I really NEED to do. Hoping to gain some weight. I can't say I've ever really "enjoyed" smoking and have even questioned why I was lighting one up when I really didn't want it. They were 'just there' and now they aren't.


It isn't easy but good luck with it!
Good for you! You're past the hardest part, in my experience. Exercising, snacking, and distracting yourself with ANYTHING helps. And contrary to others' advice, if you need candy/Coke to avoid smoking, I say go for it. The cravings if any, will pass, little by little.
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:57 AM
 
9,151 posts, read 7,211,418 times
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Looking at the current results.

I regret being overweight most of my life. I finally figured out how to stay thin about 15 years ago, but it was too late for my poor skin. Lots of incredibly ugly hangy down skin left.

I regret not taking better care of my teeth as a child. We ate sugary desserts and treats every day growing up (thus the obesity) and it gave us kids a ton of cavities too. I'd be so much happier and have a healthier mouth if I still had all my original teeth.

I regret not taking better care of my emotional health. I wish I had figured out much earlier that there is no shame in seeing a psychologist.

Other than that, I don't have many regrets about how I "found things today/tomorrow."
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Old 01-03-2017, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,385 posts, read 7,918,717 times
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I'll be 60 in a couple of weeks but I never felt better. We ice skate once a week, roller skate once a week and ski as much as we can during the winter. We walked for 6 miles on New Years Eve and I was still ready to go. I spend a lot of time on my bike in the summer and have stared riding the boring stationary bike. I never smoked (well anything that didn't give me a buzz.) I'm a social drinker and enjoy an occasional glass of wine at night. I'm working on losing that belly bulge and I'd feel better with 25 pounds off of my body. I'm grateful that I had the insight at 16 to never start smoking. My idiot parents said we could as soon as we turned 16. I also never did that other thing to excess either. I knew that I had to make this body last well into my senior years and I wanted to take care of it. Well except when my neighbor brought over all these great home made Christmas cookies. I was down to having to lose only 15 pounds until the holidays came around. I'm back on no carbs again for a month. Oh crap. I forgot about the birthday cake. Doh!
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Old 01-03-2017, 10:15 AM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,554,182 times
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A lot of obesity is self-medicating for people who aren't taking drugs or drinking alcohol or smoking cigarettes. Food can serve the same purpose. There is no desire to become obese but there is a craving to eat, especially carbs, which can have a calming effect.

I never had a weight problem until I turned 40 and went to night shifts and found my hunger outrageous. I have been able to lose about half of the extra weight and have a lot of hope that in retirement I will get healthier. Nights are really a bear for health. I have my reasons for doing them for so long, but I am actively counting the days until I'm outta there, likely Jan. 1, 2018. Health is one reason I decided to retire a year or so earlier than made perfect financial sense, and to have more time to enjoy my new retired life.

Relatives all seem to live a long time without dementia. If my mother hadn't smoked,she would have made it past 77. My father got pancreatic cancer at 87. In my family, you're either nice and Jewish and you get cancer, or crazy and Christian and live forever. So far I'm doing OK for both sides. (One grandfather died of pneumonia before antibiotics got on the general market, that's how far back we go!)
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:01 PM
 
1,918 posts, read 2,960,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
This statement is in my local YMCA about the hot tub. I just swapped "body" in there, but it's true about anything really.

Some of my family members haven't treated themselves well. From smoking to drug abuse, to morbid obesity, poor nutrition, and a very sedentary lifestyle, many of my family members have a multitude of health problems in their 50s/60s. At an age when most of this board's members are still healthy and vital, my family seems to be winding down!

Did you take care of your health during your younger years? How are you doing now? Smoke or drink a lot? Good nutrition or bad? Active or sedentary? What advice would you give to younger folks, and what regrets do you have about how you treated yourself?


I was born in `68. During junior high and high school, I lifted weights, studied martial arts, rode my bike thousands of miles. I was on track to become a pro kickboxer. Then a knee injury put the brakes on that. Then I discovered guitar.....


By 1991, I was a Rock & Roll guitar player, and got wrapped up in the "Rock & Roll" lifestyle. Late nights, loud music, hot women, whiskey and fast cars......God how I miss those day, lol.


I'm now 48, and trying to undo about 30 years of abuse and damage to myself. I could give advice on how to avoid all the problems I've had and still have, but when you're 25 years old, you think your invincible, so it wouldn't do much good.


Do I regret what I've done? Not the actual experiences themselves, but the lack of understanding of the bodies complexities and how to care for our internal systems is something I wish I'd known about much sooner. I'm making progress, but undoing 30 years of damage takes a bit of time, so if anybody listens to me, just be nice to yourself and avoid as many of life's "poisons" as you can. They will come back to haunt you, trust me.


SS
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:10 PM
 
11,263 posts, read 8,424,427 times
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I hope no one thinks I'm judging anyone who struggles with weight. No more than smokers. I've struggled with both.

It's just that there are serious health issues involved and you CAN do something about it. I find both behaviors self-destructive. At least they were for me. VERY self destructive.
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,580 posts, read 17,553,447 times
Reputation: 27645
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
A lot of obesity is self-medicating for people who aren't taking drugs or drinking alcohol or smoking cigarettes. Food can serve the same purpose. There is no desire to become obese but there is a craving to eat, especially carbs, which can have a calming effect.
I think there is some sort of therapy behind it.

Around here, many families still eat together - it's an area with very traditional values. Being in the South, a lot of the food we consume is not the healthiest anyway, and at least in my immediate area, it's hard to even find healthy food at rural grocery stores.

Mother feels bad, so frankly some greasy fast food is more comforting than a salad. As her health has worsened and she gained weight, it has become more difficult to impossible to do things she previously used to do. Then you get depressed over your condition, but food is always available to comfort you.
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