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Old 01-04-2017, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Born in L.A. - NYC is Second Home - Rustbelt is Home Base
1,608 posts, read 741,110 times
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I'd lay off the porn and self pleasure a notch or two.
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Old 01-05-2017, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,754,934 times
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Food today is very different than it was in our parents' generation. And I'm not talking about fast food. Hormone injected cattle and other meats, preservatives, pesticides, fertilizers, ways of slaughter and processing all contribute to the obesity epidemic today. So we put chemical laden food, sedentary jobs, social isolation due to age or other causes, lack of a supportive community all together and we can see how we got this way.
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Old 01-05-2017, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,553,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Food today is very different than it was in our parents' generation. And I'm not talking about fast food. Hormone injected cattle and other meats, preservatives, pesticides, fertilizers, ways of slaughter and processing all contribute to the obesity epidemic today. So we put chemical laden food, sedentary jobs, social isolation due to age or other causes, lack of a supportive community all together and we can see how we got this way.
Definitely. You have to make a special effort to not find things laden with HFCS and other "additives." It isn't healthy at all.
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:05 AM
 
676 posts, read 333,791 times
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Back to the topic? "How you treat your body today is how you'll find it tomorrow." Food industry and evolution on right on this topic.
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Old 01-05-2017, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Speaking of age and exercise

Student's Adidas Commercial Is Everything Advertising Should Be | The Huffington Post
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Old 01-05-2017, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,971,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldwoman View Post
Back to the topic? "How you treat your body today is how you'll find it tomorrow." Food industry and evolution on right on this topic.
IMO it rather is on topic. Of course we need to treat our bodies well.

My relevant point in my post, above, is that our elders many of whom abused their bodies in so many ways STILL lived to a ripe old age, sure with aches and pains perhaps, but with nowhere near the consciousness we boomers have about health.

What are the real factors that had them living very long lives? Almost all my female friends died of cancer in their 60s! They were educated, smart, and all but one had good diets (organic, etc), social engagement, passions, and physical activity. Why would they die young, while those in my parent's gen tended to live 20 or 30 years beyond whether they wanted to or not?

The only factor I can think of is perhaps regularity in mealtimes - no fast foods (grease), even if it was a baloney sandwich with lettuce on white bread - and a regular routine to the day - going to sleep at a regular time. Much less stress then, such as traffic and too much to do.

This has puzzled me for a long time.
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Old 01-05-2017, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Near a river
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Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post

beautiful!! a real tear-jerker, brilliant student
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Old 01-05-2017, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,553,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiverBird View Post
IMO it rather is on topic. Of course we need to treat our bodies well.

My relevant point in my post, above, is that our elders many of whom abused their bodies in so many ways STILL lived to a ripe old age, sure with aches and pains perhaps, but with nowhere near the consciousness we boomers have about health.

What are the real factors that had them living very long lives? Almost all my female friends died of cancer in their 60s! They were educated, smart, and all but one had good diets (organic, etc), social engagement, passions, and physical activity. Why would they die young, while those in my parent's gen tended to live 20 or 30 years beyond whether they wanted to or not?

The only factor I can think of is perhaps regularity in mealtimes - no fast foods (grease), even if it was a baloney sandwich with lettuce on white bread - and a regular routine to the day - going to sleep at a regular time. Much less stress then, such as traffic and too much to do.

This has puzzled me for a long time.
To some extent, it is uncontrollable and seemingly random.

One of my grandfathers started having heart troubles in his early 50s, back in the 80s. He never smoked or drank, ate reasonably well, was not overweight, etc. However, he was unwell for the majority of my life. Even when he retired at 62, he often got out of breath, had to take frequent breaks doing anything physical, couldn't be working in the hottest part of the day, etc. He died in 2009, either 76 or 77, but for the last couple of years had difficulty in moving around the house, was in and out of the hospital, etc. His mother died in his childhood, his brother died around 50 from meningitis, and his dad made it to about 70.

The other grandfather is 82, living, and has no major medical problems. He was an alcoholic until age 75 (when he had a massive heart attack, and went through full blown DTs while in the hospital for the heart attack) and was a heavy smoker and tobacco chewer (mostly pipe tobacco, but occasionally marijuana and cigarettes). He has multiple felonies and over a dozen DUIs. He's always been heavy set. He had a double knee replacement around the first of the year and was walking unassisted within a month. He owns a small business for appliance repairs and can still load a refrigerator by himself. His dad committed suicide in his 60s, but his grandfather lived well into his 90s.
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Old 01-05-2017, 10:31 AM
 
6,308 posts, read 3,572,105 times
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How about air pollutants as a factor? I'm sure that every generation has been increasingly exposed to them including microwaves and radiation.


I remember in third grade when they were still testing the atomic bombs in the USA that a radiated cloud passed over MN and we were told not to drink the milk for a period of time. What else was it doing to us?


When I was in high school I walked the beans and beet fields hoeing weeds. Within a generation the kids were riding the "bean bars" spraying toxic chemicals on the fields. And riding in a cloud of fumes.


I'd definitely add being more sedentary and increased pollution as factors in poor health. The pollution can even contribute to damaging genetic material and so affecting the next generation.
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Old 01-05-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Idaho
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While I agree that there are more harmful chemicals, additives in our food/drink and more pollutants, the facts show that american life expectancy has increased over the years

Life Expectancy at Birth by Race and Sex, 1930–2010

Quote:

All races White Black
Year Both sexes Male Female Both sexes Male Female Both sexes Male Female
2010 78.7 76.2 81.1 79 76.5 81.3 75.1 71.8 78
1990 75.4 71.8 78.8 76.1 72.7 79.4 69.1 64.5 73.6
1980 73.7 70 77.4 74.4 70.7 78.1 68.1 63.8 72.5
1970 70.8 67.1 74.7 71.7 68 75.6 64.1 60 68.3
1960 69.7 66.6 73.1 70.6 67.4 74.1 — — —
1950 68.2 65.6 71.1 69.1 66.5 72.2 — — —
1940 62.9 60.8 65.2 64.2 62.1 66.6 — — —
1930 59.7 58.1 61.6 61.4 59.7 63.5 48.1 47.3 49.2
It is clear that better and advanced medical/health care plays a big role in prolonging life, and longer life does not equate to better health condition. However, I think that better understanding and education has contributed to improved health of many people (more pollutant controls, fewer smokers, more emphasis on physical education).

It is also a fact that Americans have become more sedentary and consuming more junk foods. Children programs are filled with ads for sugary cereals, calories rich snacks. Adult programs are loaded with ads for fast foods, beers etc.

One one hand, we have a segment of the population (mostly in big coastal cities) who are very health conscious and do all the right things (don't smoke, drink moderately, eat healthy food, exercise etc.). On the other hand, many people continue to merrily eat and drink their way to obesity while living a sedentary life gluing to their desk/monitor at work and the tube at home!

IMO, the bottom line is that it is still the individual responsibility to take good care of themselves AND their children. It's sad to see fat children of obese people being constantly fed all the sugary/fatty foods and drinks.

Chemicals, additives, pollutants etc may cause some illnesses but can not be blamed for making people fat. Furthermore, it is obvious that these external factors are not responsible for people's sedentary life!
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