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Old 02-12-2018, 05:16 PM
 
6,620 posts, read 3,748,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Although many jobs can be physically exhausting if one is older with less energy or older with health problems which makes it difficult to carry out job duties, not just the jobs of laborers. The body of an older person is often different than a younger person's body. That's sometimes why people retire at age 62, or ages 63-65. For example, arthritis can make it difficult to stand or walk easily.
Well, I'm over 60. While some people's bodies start breaking down a lot by that age, that's not the norm.

60 is not the same as 50, for sure. But some 60 somethings are healthier than some 50 somethings.

We're living longer, now. At 60 years old, many people have 35 to 40 years to go. That's a long time to be on Social Security and not work.

Maybe a program to help people transition to DIFFERENT work after 65?
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,910 posts, read 14,235,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
We're living longer, now. At 60 years old, many people have 35 to 40 years to go. That's a long time to be on Social Security and not work.

Maybe a program to help people transition to DIFFERENT work after 65?
There are more than 18 Million Americans between the ages of 65 and 69.

You'll need to create 18 Million jobs in order to create job openings for 20-24 age group.

If you fail to do that, you will have a perennial Unemployment Rate of 14.2%
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:10 PM
 
5,426 posts, read 3,449,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post

Well, I'm over 60. While some people's bodies start breaking down a lot by that age, that's not the norm.

60 is not the same as 50, for sure. But some 60 somethings are healthier than some 50 somethings.

We're living longer, now. At 60 years old, many people have 35 to 40 years to go. That's a long time to be on Social Security and not work.

Maybe a program to help people transition to DIFFERENT work after 65?
If you live to age 95 to 100, as you state, let me know, because you will be quite an individual!

"In 2016, life expectancy was 78.6 years for the total U.S. population. For males, life expectancy was 76.1 in 2016. For females, life expectancy remained the same at 81.1."
https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db293.pdf

"On average, Americans can now expect to live 78.6 years, a statistically significant drop of 0.1 year, according to a report on 2016 data published Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics. Women can now expect to live a full five years longer than men: 81.1 years vs. 76.1 years."
https://www.cnn.com/2017/12/21/healt...udy/index.html

Social Security Actuarial Life Table
https://www.ssa.gov/oact/STATS/table4c6.html

Last edited by matisse12; 02-12-2018 at 06:43 PM..
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Old 02-13-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,910 posts, read 14,235,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
If you live to age 95 to 100, as you state, let me know, because you will be quite an individual!

"In 2016, life expectancy was 78.6 years for the total U.S. population. For males, life expectancy was 76.1 in 2016. For females, life expectancy remained the same at 81.1."
https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db293.pdf

"On average, Americans can now expect to live 78.6 years, a statistically significant drop of 0.1 year, according to a report on 2016 data published Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics. Women can now expect to live a full five years longer than men: 81.1 years vs. 76.1 years."
https://www.cnn.com/2017/12/21/healt...udy/index.html

Social Security Actuarial Life Table
https://www.ssa.gov/oact/STATS/table4c6.html
It's rather unremarkable, really.

According to data we compiled:
  • A man reaching age 65 today can expect to live, on average, until age 84.3.
  • A woman turning age 65 today can expect to live, on average, until age 86.6.


https://www.ssa.gov/planners/lifeexpectancy.html


The key issue is how long does one live after reaching 65 years of age.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:06 PM
 
71,561 posts, read 71,730,589 times
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people do not understand life expectancy refers to when a particular group pass the point where 1/2 are dead and 1/2 alive .

life expectancy at birth has no relevance to anything pertaining to retirement .

you need to look at that cohort once all the sick , weak and genetically disposed to an early death are eliminated from the equation . as you get older the odds of living longer increase by a lot .

couples have much higher statistics too . there is almost a 50% chance a 65 year old couple will have one of them see 90 .

the odds are much higher than singles because either can out live the other so you have 2 horses in the race with one bet .

a child born in 2014 has a life expectancy (average age at death) of 79. However, the median age of death for the same child is 83, and the modal (most common) age at death is 89! .

Last edited by mathjak107; 02-13-2018 at 04:15 PM..
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Old 02-14-2018, 04:08 PM
 
4,432 posts, read 2,612,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdogmom13 View Post
Not all, no, but many, and sometimes ones you wouldn't think are.

I chose a healthcare career. I'm on my feet for 12-13 hours with few breaks (we're lucky to get an uninterrupted 30 minute lunch break), I'm dragging a heavy, balky computer-on-wheels around the whole hospital while I see my patients so I can do mandated charting at bedside, I'm helping reposition patients, moving them from beds to CT scan/MRI/xray tables, helping drag stubborn supposedly self-driving beds down long hallways, reaching up/down/over/around patients to plug in oxygen tubing or electrical cords in poorly designed rooms. My job doesn't always APPEAR to be physically demanding; if you met me in the emergency room, you'd probably wonder how difficult it could be to give nebulizer treatments. I've been doing this for 25 years, I love what I do, but yeah, my body has taken a beating. I'm 62 now and there's no way I could do this full time until I'm 70 or longer.
I agree. In my younger years I worked retail. On my feet a lot, unloading trucks, stocking shelves with merchandise of all sizes and weight, playing cashier, etc. At night I was on my feet as,a line cook. I always had more than one job, I was no slouch.

But I have been dealing with degenerative disc disease since 24, have compound compression fractures in my veterbra, have serious bipolar depression hours, and other ailments. I've had 21,surgeries, on a lot of medication and have 25 chronic continuing medical conditions, including early stage heart failure.

I was medically retired at 40 on SSDI. 14 years later it isn't quite paying bills like it did when I first started.
We also accumulated some debt updating and upgrading the house we recently bought. I have gone back to work part time, allowed to do so and still collect SSDI if I'm ubder what they call SGA. I can work 24 hours a week, that's about all I can take. I am now a front desk clerk, not to strenuous, but in me feet and bad leg a lot. I get around with a cane. Early for training I had 3 weeks of 40 hours mandatory, but found it absolutely wore me out ( I'm 54 now and was surprised to get hired at my age in my physical condition).

I have a remaining 6 weeks I have a grace period which work won't count against me. They are short staffed and even32 hours is too much, it's wearing me out . I said I could do no more than 3 days in a row without a day off, but that's even hard. If I earn more than SGA in 6 weeks I will lose my SSDI check for thst month.

I do get to sit in the office when not busy but the shift is 8 hours regardless.

Once the extra debt is paid off on 3 years, I believe if I even make it that far, I will gave to rely totally on the ssdi again.

By tgen my OH, who has pagets bone disease will be 62. Hopefully if my OH s SS is,decent then, may have to also retire. We both are getting to where work is actually killing us. I know I cannot work to even 62 let alone my FRA of 67, and definitely not to 69. I may be lucky to still be alive by tgen, seriously. My OH has,2 jobs.

We won't have a lavish retirement by any means but should get along I'd we plan well. I. 3 years my FIL should have passed by tgen, so tgere will be a small inheritance and his house to sell. Where we want to retire to is far far cheaper COL than here in upstate N.Y..

I think done of these,lifers in Congress feel if they can do it, so can the rest of us, but we all know they mostly sit around doing nothing, at least not usually to our benefits.
So I hope my OH and I can work something out.

It is NOT that we don't WANT to work, our bodies ate telling us strongly that,we CAN'T work..

Only major problem will be health care coverage for my OH until 65 Medicare sets in.

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Old 02-14-2018, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
31,054 posts, read 13,591,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Although many jobs can be physically exhausting if one is older with less energy or older with health problems which makes it difficult to carry out job duties, not just the jobs of laborers. The body of an older person is often different than a younger person's body. That's sometimes why people retire at age 62, or ages 63-65. For example, arthritis can make it difficult to stand or walk easily.
yep! or even to use a keyboard for long periods, I have arthritis in both wrists there is no way I could work at a job that required prolonged keyboard use
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Old 02-14-2018, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,888 posts, read 25,323,560 times
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Look at the people making the decisions. They are OLD, OLD, and OLD. Sure they can work till they are 90 because they have their own serfs and oafs to take care of all their needs and wants, manage their schedules, and they have Cadillac healthcare available on demand 24/7(they even have doctors and a pharmacy right there). In a way, being a member of Congress is like assisted living. For free! We pay for everything for them. They even get a 1K per month car allowance. And they get paid on top of all this.

Contrast this with the average casino worker in Las Vegas. He has been on his feet for decades now and all he can do is shuffle around in pain. All those craptastic jobs take a toll on you and you are physically DONE in your 50's. Seriously I don't think people doing jobs where you do not sit at a desk all day(or at least part of the time) can limp through till they are 68 or 70. And do we really want to see 68yo construction workers climbing all over the superstructure of that new 60 story building? Or a 70yo cocktail waitress humping cocktails in a pushup bra and a microskirt? Yeah a very few people may still be able to do those things but the vast majority can't!
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Old 02-14-2018, 08:05 PM
 
7,981 posts, read 3,465,270 times
Reputation: 11230
Letís cut these geniuses benefits. They donít care about anyone but themselves anyway. Who is going to be able to find employment at that age. Itís bad enough after 50. Give me a break.
These useless politicians need a cut. Most havenít helped anyone but themselves.
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Old 02-14-2018, 09:11 PM
 
6,620 posts, read 3,748,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
There are more than 18 Million Americans between the ages of 65 and 69.

You'll need to create 18 Million jobs in order to create job openings for 20-24 age group.

If you fail to do that, you will have a perennial Unemployment Rate of 14.2%
You forgot to include the cite to the source for that information: 18 million jobs will be needed; unemployment rate of 14.2%.

Are you saying that young people are more important than older people? So they have priority for job openings? They have that, anyway. But you propose that it be institutionalized, and taxes go up to PAY for the seniors not to work?

Seniors won't work for decades, obviously. They'll work for maybe a decade. Use your noggin. Back to school with you!
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