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Old 01-08-2017, 11:22 AM
 
1,630 posts, read 748,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
So you're sorta Retired Now?
I'll bet you divined that from reading the title alone.
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Old 01-08-2017, 11:34 AM
 
1,143 posts, read 1,017,670 times
Reputation: 1466
I smile every month when that direct deposit rolls in. I chuckled at the end of the year "stipend" deposit.
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Old 01-08-2017, 02:20 PM
 
Location: R.I.
978 posts, read 605,665 times
Reputation: 4242
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious Investor View Post
Relatives died- and left me some money, and savings and investments from my later years when I did better at work.

(Actually I am investing my Social Security money now because I came into some money recently but the year after I collected I was smiling every day when that money came into my bank account. I got emotional when that money became available.)
Glad it is all working out for you .
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Old 01-08-2017, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,737,509 times
Reputation: 32304
I understand the OP's delight, but my own emotions were much more muted. I was pleased, of course, to get the first monthly direct deposit of my pension, but I had known the date it was coming and I knew the amount (gross amount, that is), so it was just not that big a deal. Yep, it's here, just like I was expecting.


That was eleven and a half years ago, and it has never failed to arrive when it's supposed to arrive.
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Old 01-08-2017, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,764 posts, read 10,843,052 times
Reputation: 16639
In a recent Gallup Poll, it was revealed that less than 30-percent of pre-retirees thought Social Security would be a major part of their retirement income. In a similar survey, about 60-percent of post-retirees found that SS was actually a major part of their retirement income.

Social Security | Gallup Historical Trends
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Old 01-08-2017, 04:12 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,581 posts, read 10,923,342 times
Reputation: 19215
When I received my first social security payment, there was nothing to celebrate as it meant that I had reached the age of seventy.
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Old 01-08-2017, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,664,674 times
Reputation: 35449
I breathed a huge sigh of relief when I received my first SS check. I had to retire earlier than I had planned due to a disability. I began drawing on SS the first year in which I would be able to have full benefits. It meant I no longer had to struggle to get to work and put in a full day there.
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Old 01-08-2017, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,133 posts, read 12,385,819 times
Reputation: 13976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious Investor View Post
Many of the posters on this board think of their Social Security check as an after thought. Many of you have huge 401k balances, pensions and annuities. You have the assets to wait until you are 70 to collect Social Security but retire at fifty and use your vast savings and pensions to pay the bills.

Though, I hope you understand that people like this are a minority in America. MOST Americans can't afford to retire until they get a Social Security check. And Social Security covers more than 50% of their retirement expenses.

That is me. My Social Security check covers about half of my retirement expenses.

My so called career was a nightmare. I was fired often, laid off often and usually ended up in the worst companies. My various bosses yelled at me, told me I was no good and liked to play games with my self confidence. I suffered through long periods of unemployment and tough financial times. I jumped from job to job, career field to career field. I was miserable.

When the first Social Security check came in I had a huge emotional reaction. FREEDOM!

(I still work part time (in a semi retirement role), but it is an easy job with none of the pressures of management or a professional role. I actually like it. But I don't need it and it is only part time. For the first time in my life I am in freedom!)
I just worked it up and social security constitutes 74.55% of our retirement income when I do retire at age 70 which is less than two years away now.

Obviously the longer I put off collecting benefits, mine go up about $94 every six months that I delay, the percentage social security goes up.
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Old 01-08-2017, 08:18 PM
 
Location: 2 blocks from bay in L.I, NY
1,767 posts, read 1,438,577 times
Reputation: 2743
Default Congratulations

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious Investor View Post
Many of the posters on this board think of their Social Security check as an after thought. Many of you have huge 401k balances, pensions and annuities. You have the assets to wait until you are 70 to collect Social Security but retire at fifty and use your vast savings and pensions to pay the bills.

Though, I hope you understand that people like this are a minority in America. MOST Americans can't afford to retire until they get a Social Security check. And Social Security covers more than 50% of their retirement expenses.

That is me. My Social Security check covers about half of my retirement expenses.

My so called career was a nightmare. I was fired often, laid off often and usually ended up in the worst companies. My various bosses yelled at me, told me I was no good and liked to play games with my self confidence. I suffered through long periods of unemployment and tough financial times. I jumped from job to job, career field to career field. I was miserable.

When the first Social Security check came in I had a huge emotional reaction. FREEDOM!

(I still work part time (in a semi retirement role), but it is an easy job with none of the pressures of management or a professional role. I actually like it. But I don't need it and it is only part time. For the first time in my life I am in freedom!)
Congratulations to you!!

My step-father (RIP) and my mom depended on their SS checks as well. So do my other older relatives.

I noticed too that most posters here on C-D claim to make over $100k annually even the ones on a whim who up and move to a new state or city without a job. They move into a new $350k+ home in an upscale, crime free walkable neighborhood, with shopping, five-star restaurants, art galleries, and the top performing public schools. According to their post, within a short time in their new location they find a new job (advertised on Craiglist or Indeed or through a temp agency?) which starts them at $65K plus $20k bonus. Two years later, they're promoted to a position that pays $100k and to top it off allowed them to work from home whenver they want. So there you have it.

On the Financial-economics threads, along with their huge 401k plans and numerous ROTH IRAs top-offed at max contributions most of the posters claimed to have all gone to top tier universities which cost $50k per year yet they graduated debt free due to daddy's money or a part-time job sacking groceries. They are now all working in jobs whose minimum salary is $100k but that is primarily for the low-achievers. These high-achieving posters are clearing $150K+ annually after taxes. Another poster claims that his salary tripled within a year or two of being on the job and now his wife is a stay-at-home mom raising children yet he's paid off not only his own college debt but his wife's too - all within a span of TWO years. It's all just so surreal!

Yet, most of the people I know are like you, OP. SS check is crucial to maintaining their cost of living. There is nothing wrong with that. You've paid into over the decades that you worked. Let the high-rollers kick rocks! If their SS checks are so unneeded why don't they donate them to the poor (someone who wasn't able to land one of these $100k+ salary jobs that seem so ubiquitous and easy to get), if the many C-D posters are to be believed.
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Old 01-08-2017, 08:34 PM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,924 posts, read 989,259 times
Reputation: 6931
I didn't really believe that money was going to magically appear in my account until the first check arrived. It is security to me, knowing that sum will be there on the same day every month. I plan my life around it.


If I didn't get it, I would manage somehow. I'm glad I don't have to
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