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View Poll Results: People are living longer, so they should work a full time job longer.
Yes, in most cases, I think that is true 27 24.32%
Maybe but only people who work in white collar non physical jobs 23 20.72%
NO! Because there is a shortage of jobs and lets give the young people a chance to work at them 61 54.95%
Voters: 111. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-13-2017, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,510,898 times
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Welcome to the post-industrial economy; most of us recognize (and often, too late) that if we are going to earn the big bucks, we have to start early and keep up with a fast pace. Once that window closes, the game more often than not consists of playing out the string.

But in fairness, "the system" has any number of means by which any reasonably-motivated individual can keep an iron or two in the fire, and I think we saw a lot of this demonstrated during the Great Recession.

The Trumpsters have to understand that the economy of the Fifties can't be revived, the Special Snowflakes have to learn that there is a lot of grit and sweat involved in earning a living, and we all have to recognize that the amount of support available from the public sector is finite,

The great game will go on, but it's up to each one of us to determine (up to a point) how our own hand plays out.
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:12 PM
 
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In theory I do think everyone should work longer but not every type of job can be filled with seniors. By that age we are not that productive and efficient as we were when younger. Our bodies will have been worn down and our logic has been diminished a bit. Illness will catch up to the majority of us and we will no longer be able to handle a full-time job.

I plan to work as long as I can barring injuries, illness, and age discrimination. Hopefully I can just work part-time as long as someone will employ me.
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Old 01-14-2017, 12:45 AM
 
Location: USA
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It's most likely they are anticipating most people working sedentary type office jobs. I knew a lawyer who was 90 years old and still practicing. I don't think there are too many 90 year olds doing hard manual labor though.
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Old 01-14-2017, 12:55 AM
 
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We don't know what illness we are going to have as we age. I know so many people with cancer at 60 or younger. You can't work after having chemo therapy your just too weak to do much but sit and watch tv.
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Old 01-14-2017, 01:55 AM
 
71,626 posts, read 71,751,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
What a lot of people over 60 do is work a less stressful part time job. Even though seniors live longer, most find working a full day just too demanding, and beyond their abilities. Working part time still supplies an income.
what really happens is a lot of folks think they will work a more stress free job .

but what they really do is give up a good paying job with benefits and take a supposedly stress free job for lower pay , crappy hours and no benefits .

what they didn't plan on is the fact at the new job they are now working under a grunt supervisor who watches their every move . they are under a microscope , while at their other job they were not even on the radar at that point .

now they get the crappy schedule too that goes with being new .

many folks i know hate that supposedly stress free job once they realize they traded one stress for another and don't even get compensated for it .
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Old 01-14-2017, 03:18 AM
 
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very interesting look in to life expectancy by kitces .


https://www.kitces.com/blog/squaring...ment-planning/
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Old 01-14-2017, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
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Then removing the cap is the obvious solution
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Old 01-14-2017, 04:59 AM
 
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here are some of the excerpts from kltces's article on just what the story is in life expectancy and retirement . basically we are not living longer age wise as much as more of us are living to older ages than we did ..

“life expectancy” can be a somewhat misleading term. Many people hear the term and think of it as a measure of how long they can “expect to live”. In reality, though, life expectancy is a measure of the average time a person within some particular population is expected to live. While the average is meaningful in many respects, it may not always provide the best measure for setting expectations about the actual age someone is likely to reach. Because mortality rates aren’t constant across a lifespan and the distribution of ages at death are heavily skewed (i.e., more people die old than young), commonly cited life expectancy measures—particularly life expectancy at birth, which is most often cited in the media—may result in misleading expectations.

For instance, a child born in 2014 has a life expectancy (average age at death) of 79. However, the median age of death for the same child is 83, and the modal (most common) age at death is 89! Given the shape of the distribution of ages at death (negatively skewed), it’s simply a mathematical fact that the mean is going to be lower than the median or the mode.



Understanding Longevity Expectations With Survival Curves
One way to explore some of the nuances within mortality figures is to visualize that data through the use of a survival curve – a figure which plots percentage of people still alive (i.e., the “survival rates” of a population) over time. Looking at the trends in how survival curves change over time can help us to not just see whether life expectancy is changing, but specifically where changes are occurring across it.



As you can see in the survival curve above, only roughly 1-in-10 people born in 2014 is expected to die prior to age 60 (i.e., 90% are still alive), but beyond that point, the rate of death begins to increase substantially. However, over 60% of children born in 2014 are still expected to be alive when the cohort reaches their “life expectancy” (i.e., average age at death) of 79. The median (age 83) is equivalent to the 50th percentile, and the mode (89) is roughly around the 30th percentile. By age 100, only 2% of people born in 2014 are expected to still be alive. While simple statistics like life expectancy certainly serve a purpose, survival curves give us a much better look at the “story” behind the data.
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Old 01-14-2017, 09:00 AM
 
20,141 posts, read 11,167,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
It's most likely they are anticipating most people working sedentary type office jobs. I knew a lawyer who was 90 years old and still practicing. I don't think there are too many 90 year olds doing hard manual labor though.
That's easier when one can continue in the same field. Completely "re-inventing" oneself becomes increasingly difficult at a logarithmic rate after one has gotten into his fifties.
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Old 01-15-2017, 03:51 AM
 
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many time's the steps to reinventing are just gradual small shifts in to other areas of what you already know . shifting in to area's that seem to be already related but where more of a specialty is needed in that area and demand is higher can produce totally different results . the money will always be in doing the things others can't or won't do for themselves .

now at 64 i still get called for consultation work and can easily find full time employment in that field . in fact not "consulting " so much is becoming a goal this year .

while i enjoy what i do very much the demand can lead to me working more than i want if i don't control it . at first i was doing little bits of consulting to just interact with others 2 days a month and do what i enjoy . but that snow balled a bit more than i want so i am scaling back .

so the point is you may be able to reinvent in to area's you may already know only you don't know you already know most of what you need to know so it just becomes a matter of marketing yourself . .

i can't speak for anyone else's careers but my own career was always evolving for 40 years as one area saturated with employee's and other areas opened up and today age seems not to be a factor if demand is there .. one of my functions in my consulting job is to train newbee's in my area of expertise for the company i worked for so it is kind of just marketing what i know .

i have had requests from other company's to do the same but do not really want to help competitors but if i did , it could easily become a full time gig ..

reinventing may not be so much an age thing as much as it is a creativity and demand thing .

Last edited by mathjak107; 01-15-2017 at 04:40 AM..
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