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Old 01-21-2017, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,668,169 times
Reputation: 35449

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perryinva View Post
Plus a woman that hates to shop for clothes? Pretty rare.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
(Raises hand.)
Raising my hand too. Catalogs are my friend.

 
Old 01-21-2017, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Eastern Oregon
983 posts, read 761,844 times
Reputation: 1859
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Someone buys that stuff but it isn't me.

For starters:

No jewelry
No cosmetics
No perfumes
No nail polish or manicures (ordinary nail clippers do just fine)
No dressy clothes whatsoever
Basic underwear, not that tawdry stuff that MEN are fascinated by
No fancy or high-maintenance hair styles
No special brushes or combs, just a plain black Ace pocket comb and a decent bristle brush

I do like to break up the Ivory Soap routine with some naturally-scented handmade soap bars or shampoos, the kind sold in small indie stores. They smell wonderful yet subtle, to me. And because I live in a dry climate, I apply basic skin lotion (ordinary supermarket stuff) every other day, and sometimes colorless lip balm.

Clothes are chosen for both function and (secondarily) appearance, but if they lack function, I don't buy them at ALL.

I totally relate to the OP's husband even though I am female and not an engineer. Practicality, versatility, and comfort win, hands down.
Me too!

There is that other thread about how/if the way people dress has changed after retirement. For many of us - we had to "dress to impress" all of our working years. Now we can dress for comfort and practicality if we choose, and it's great!
 
Old 01-21-2017, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I find it interesting that men's clothes are divided between "dress" and comfortable. Can't nice clothes be comfortable? He is trim so there is no issue with binding waists, etc. I would never expect him to wear anything uncomfortable just as I don't either.

Now women's dressy clothes (especially ridiculous shoes) can be uncomfortable. Most require a bra! Most don't have elastic waistbands and fit loosely.

Khakis and a button -down collar shirt look pretty comfortable to me. He also has some of those black "tennis" shoes which look like "grown up " shoes.
Here's a male agreeing with you. It's a false dichotomy about dress versus comfortable. I am not at all uncomfortable when I look nice dress-wise. Jeans are not one iota more comfortable physically than dress slacks, but there is, I admit, an additional comfort factor with the jeans in that you are less concerned about getting them dirty.
 
Old 01-21-2017, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,485 posts, read 43,777,962 times
Reputation: 47257
I don't believe in dressing to impress. I simply believe in dressing not to offend. And going to a doctor's, lawyer's, minister's, CPA's, etc office dressed TOO casually shows lack of respect for the professional as well as yourself.

We had a conference appointment with several of our daughter's teachers. I asked him to wear khakis and he understood my concern. Why not the doctor?

But I have to admit I showed him this thread and we had a good conversation. Even though I've talked to him about it before, apparently he didn't think it bothered me as much as it does. I think it is like Charlie Brown's teachers talking and all we hear is blah blah blah, ***, ***, ***. After 40 years I think he tunes me out. But now he knows and he said "Something to give more thought to" whatever that means.
 
Old 01-21-2017, 10:52 AM
 
3,945 posts, read 3,263,788 times
Reputation: 11320
There's been a number of threads on men's dress habits, as opposed to women's, but styles change, and men seldom take note by throwing out clothes and shopping for the new styles. Women on the other hand, do toss perfectly good clothes in order to accommodate new, and more stylish outfits. The OP's complaint of her hubs dressing down is a common complaint from the ladies, regardless of age. The arrival of "out of shape fashion" is certainly a driver of the slob look that has become a common sight in public spaces.

When my wife and I go out we dress appropriately for the occasion, and yes, a sport coat and nice slacks/stylish jeans, and nice shoes goes a long way toward making an attempt to be decently dressed for an evening out. I live in a area of little urban development, most of the county is suburban and therefore pretty casual when it comes to clothing. While dining at the local Hilton I saw a man wearing an NFL sweatshirt, jeans, beater tennis shoes, topping off this get-up with a Trump "MAGA" red ballcap. His wife was dressed up nice and looked as though she spent some time on herself, so, is this a show of intentional disrespect on the part of men? Or have American men just gotten lazy?
 
Old 01-21-2017, 11:00 AM
 
6,321 posts, read 5,058,385 times
Reputation: 12831
Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
There's been a number of threads on men's dress habits, as opposed to women's, but styles change, and men seldom take note by throwing out clothes and shopping for the new styles. Women on the other hand, do toss perfectly good clothes in order to accommodate new, and more stylish outfits. The OP's complaint of her hubs dressing down is a common complaint from the ladies, regardless of age. The arrival of "out of shape fashion" is certainly a driver of the slob look that has become a common sight in public spaces.

When my wife and I go out we dress appropriately for the occasion, and yes, a sport coat and nice slacks/stylish jeans, and nice shoes goes a long way toward making an attempt to be decently dressed for an evening out. I live in a area of little urban development, most of the county is suburban and therefore pretty casual when it comes to clothing. While dining at the local Hilton I saw a man wearing an NFL sweatshirt, jeans, beater tennis shoes, topping off this get-up with a Trump "MAGA" red ballcap. His wife was dressed up nice and looked as though she spent some time on herself, so, is this a show of intentional disrespect on the part of men? Or have American men just gotten lazy?
maybe both? And both men and women can look messy. A relative is on a cruise and sent pics back of the crowd waiting to board. Gee - everyone looked just so sloppy. One reason I refuse to wear tee-shirts or rarely tennis shoes with jeans. Just cannot do it.
 
Old 01-21-2017, 11:12 AM
 
5,436 posts, read 2,830,519 times
Reputation: 10184
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
In thinking about this thread again, I think there might be a solution or at least a reasonable compromise.


I have never had any interest in clothing or fashion or styles, but I found a compromise that keeps my wife happy at least most of the time. When I retired 6 years ago, we got rid of most of our stuff, sold the house and took off for full time travel in a small RV. There was no room for old, worn out or excess clothing. All the old office work clothing went to Goodwill or the garbage. So did the old shirts, jackets, pretty much everything I owned. I keep a couple of dress shirts, one red tie, one black tie, a blue blazer and black shoes and socks. I have worn that rig exactly once in 6 years.


When I replaced my old clothing, I decided to buy multi-purpose clothing. I wanted to travel and visit national parks but also visit cities and museums and art galleries. Instead of jeans, I bought decent looking khaki pants and shorts. They actually cost less than most jeans. My typical shirt is a solid colored pocket T shirt. I bought a dozen or so at $4 each. I have replaced a few, but most of the originals are still brightly colored and look new. I also have a few Polos for a slightly better look. I also bought some new flannels for cold weather and some long sleeved light weight shirts. My long sleeved light weight shirts are those expensive, high tech outdoor shirts. A couple were really expensive but over the years I have found several on sale in the $15-20 range. I still have the ones from 6 years ago and will likely have them for another 10 years. I just don't wear them often.


I do have one old set of clothes set aside for painting, chalking and other really dirty projects. Otherwise, I toss my clothes whenever they fade, stain or otherwise look bad. That almost never happens. A year ago I replaced my everyday pants, 2 pair of khakis for $15 at Costco. They still look new, although my wife says they do not look crisp and pressed. Actually, I don't think they ever did. This year I splurged again. Costco has really great travel pants that fit me. Along with my old set, I now have 3 more pair of new "travel" pants, 95% nylon. They should last for years and years.


All the old ratty stuff is long gone, but I do not need to think about clothing or what I am going to wear. There is almost no cost or fuss with any of it.
NOW you have the right idea. That is my way of buying clothes. Except for the very specialized stuff, which is equipment anyway, not really clothing (such as wetsuits and bicycling shoes), clothing has to be versatile enough for several activities. And that is why I get it mostly from sporting goods stores (REI, Sierra Trading Post, smaller outdoor retailers), as well as a bit from regular department stores for things like basic underwear and sweats. Individual items made of high-tech design or fabric might cost more but I use them. A lot. And they last a long time.

For dirty chores such as weeding, changing vehicle oils, and painting, I keep some ratty old (very old) clothes around. Repurposing.

This would be different if I were still working, but without needing to dress in office attire, everything is about practicality, versatility, and comfort, as I said earlier.
 
Old 01-21-2017, 11:18 AM
 
6,321 posts, read 5,058,385 times
Reputation: 12831
I'm a female that also hates to shop. I buy most of my clothes online.
 
Old 01-21-2017, 11:22 AM
 
5,436 posts, read 2,830,519 times
Reputation: 10184
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
So the addition of a collar somehow makes a knit shirt acceptable for a variety of occasions. This is exactly why I have no interest in trying to keep up with fashion expectations. Maybe I can shop around for a clip on collar so I can keep up with the expectations of the local gold course.

Hee hee, you have to post a pic if you do that.

There are t-shirts with graphics that look like tuxedo wear. Just a thought.
 
Old 01-21-2017, 11:29 AM
 
5,436 posts, read 2,830,519 times
Reputation: 10184
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
Heheh, are you my long-lost twin?

I also seriously considered, not that long ago, just buying tons of black shirts and white shirts and black pants. I like sweaters, so in the winter, I would switch up the sweater I wore over the shirt, but that would be it. I bought a whole bunch of black and white shirts and black pants and was ready to go. I was totally into the idea of not having to spend one minute choosing what to wear. Of course, everything would be fresh and clean; it's not like I would wear the same black pants every day.

Not sure why I didn't go ahead and make the switch completely. Probably worried that my students would think their teacher was very strange. But, like you, when I find a skirt, pants or shirt or like and that fits me well, I buy it in lots of colors. And I wear clothes until they wear out or are stained, so I have had some items for years. Hmmm, maybe I should have been an engineer. Does it count that I almost became a chemist?
Make that triplets! I assume that companies discontinue manufacturers and designs very frequently, sometimes resulting in completely different sizing and cuts even for the "same" item in a newer year. Therefore, I too buy at least two of the identical model when I find something great.

Men have it somewhat easier. For example, Wrangler cowboy cut jeans or similar long-running items simply are sized by waist and inseam. Women's jeans vary all over the place, and they don't offer nearly as many inseam lengths for a given waist size.
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