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Old 02-06-2017, 07:39 AM
 
491 posts, read 597,865 times
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All this talk reminds me of my niece who is five. She was telling me something about her summer day care teacher and said "she's old like you". I met her later and she was probably in her mid twenties, I'm 63! It is all in the eyes of the beholder!
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
"Elderly" and "senior citizen" on this board seem to have completely different meanings.

"Senior citizen" generally applies to everyone above some sort of age threshold, commonly set at 55.

"Elderly" seems to imply either a condition, frail and sick, or those above a further age cutoff, probably 70+.

Many 70+ year olds are fairly healthy and vital. At 80, this number will drop off substantially. I'd consider virtually anyone over 80 elderly, as it is above the expected life expectancy in most areas. I'd also consider anyone over 50 or so who is frail or chronically ill to be elderly.
Good assessment. I am 58 and certainly not elderly, but I have a same-age cousin already in a nursing home.
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:40 AM
 
676 posts, read 333,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
Senior discounts start at 55.

I let my hair go grey and people never assume I'm not my age - lol. Fine with me. I laugh at my older sister that practically cries if people think she is even 60. She's almost 70!
Not here. Senior discounts start at 60.

I don't color my hair either ..... never have. I'm salt and pepper now. I want to look and feel healthy, fit and able. That's good enough for me.
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Old 02-07-2017, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Close to an earthquake
890 posts, read 676,616 times
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This is a reflection I recently wrote based on the recent experience I shared here in an earlier post of being "hashtagged" with the adjective elderly:

An elderly man

"I was recently mentioned in a letter written by someone who’s doing some advocacy work for me. In this letter, I was described as “elderly”.

I’ll have to be honest; at age 61 years and 99 cents, I’m not quite ready for this “elderly” hashtag. Even though I’ll be eligible to start collecting Social Security benefits in a couple weeks, elderly I’m not I shout! At least that was my first emotional reaction when reading a draft of this letter.

I suggested to the person, writing this letter on my behalf, that he find a different adjective describing who I am. He gave me at least 100 good reasons why that wasn’t a good idea so I decided to accept, just for this letter, this elderly description of me.

Honestly, when I read this elderly word describing me, it seemed that when I stood up to stretch, suddenly, I felt like I had weak knees and a wobbly balance. Was it my emotionally-injured mind playing a game with my manly-body? It felt like a long-ago boyhood experience of the time I got smacked in my juvenile gonads by a baseball.

So, what’s the modern dictionary definition of elderly?

The online version of Merriam-Webster defines the adjective elderly as “rather old; especially: being past middle age” and “old-fashioned”. In terms of popularity, Merriam-Webster ranks the word elderly as being in the bottom 50 percent of words.

Well add my vote to this bottom 50 percent list.

I like the definition someone else offered; elderly is a person who’s 15 years older than you. That’ll work for me.

In the middle-aged man advocacy work I’ve done, I’ve routinely defined the middle-aged man as someone enjoying the golden years beginning at age 45 and continuing until he becomes age 70. So, this means I’ve got some time to go enjoying my middle-aged man time. It’ll be another eight years, in my book, before I’ll officially consider myself an elderly man."
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Old 02-08-2017, 06:23 AM
 
676 posts, read 333,464 times
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"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet."

Call me young or call me old, I am not changed by either label, just your perception of how many years I have dwelled on the planet.
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Old 02-09-2017, 11:50 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,756 posts, read 54,390,602 times
Reputation: 31045
As long as there is a discount offered (restaurants, barber) I'm happy to be a senior. Elderly, not so much. I consider 60-79 to qualify as senior, though some discounts started at 55, but I think of elderly as 80s. Regardless, either is much easier to say than sexagenarian,septuagenarian or octogenarian.
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Old 02-10-2017, 05:41 AM
 
676 posts, read 333,464 times
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Yes but sexagenarian has a sexy ring to it.
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Old 02-10-2017, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Ozark Mountains
634 posts, read 466,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
Senior discounts start at 55.
Is that a rule or written somewhere?
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Old 02-11-2017, 03:06 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,843,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarknation View Post
Is that a rule or written somewhere?
No the discounts are given by businesses in order to say thank you to their customers and garner more business. A restaurant dining room that has people in it is more likely to draw additional customers than one that isn't.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,670 posts, read 33,671,635 times
Reputation: 51856
You were old at 50 when AARP started flooding you with junk mail reminding you of it.
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