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Old 01-22-2017, 08:10 AM
 
6,652 posts, read 3,764,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
I'm younger than most here, and likely facing an involuntary retirement. Living in the countryside some distance from a small "city", and about 25 miles from one of Ohio's second-tier cities, I have tended to combine errands and entertainment and whatnot, with the workplace commute. Shopping, going to the gym, the bank and so forth, gets done during lunch, or after work. Thus the distance from one's residence, to the site of businesses, the library, medical facilities and so forth, has not been much of an impediment. However, if/when not working, any venture of any kind - to mail a letter, to fetch a loaf of bread, to visit the public library to use the internet - becomes a trip of some 10 miles. This is not particularly taxing, as I have several vehicles, and the roads are generally in good condition, save for the occasional pothole or the inevitable damage caused by heavy farm-implements traversing from field to field. But it does mean that trips have to be planned carefully. Any errand becomes a large mark punctuating one's day. If having already ventured out, it is tempting to remain out, so that a trip begun right before lunch, entails a lingering in town throughout the day, past dinner.

Yearning for privacy and self-determination, must be balanced with yearning for companionship and the participatory sense of belonging in society's throng and sway. I enjoy the privacy of a long driveway on a tertiary road, the sound of birds and coyotes, the gurgling of a swollen brook receiving weeks of harsh Midwestern winter torrents. But there are times, when even in the best of health and athletic condition, one feels a queasy isolation, shuttered, shunted, missing out, in merely passive contemplation of a world frenetically in progress unabated. And this is when we question our lifestyle arrangements and the drive towards making of oneself something of a country-squire.

In short, for those of comparatively good physical and material wherewithal, the logistical difficulties of living "too far" are readily overcome. But the psychological differences are thornier.
What an excellent post. Food for thought. You should be a writer!

I don't know that the area of the house would be considered isolated, exactly. It's a subdivision, that area is growing with more expensive homes being built. It's just that it's a semi-rural burb of a small city. So the semi-rural burb doesn't have the numbers of people to justify, say, a mall or a Sam's Club. The city itself has only one Sam's Club and one Target and one mall.

However, the semi-rural area has enough people to support a thriving collection of small businesses, grocery stores, miscellaneous stores, pharmacies, an emergency clinic, and at least 2 if not more veterinarians (lots of pets out there). I don't expect that it will ever have a real mall or a Sam's Club or a Target. I wouldn't even consider it if it didn't have a nearby WalMart SuperCenter and a couple of grocery stores.

Then of course, there's online ordering these days, which makes life easier. Deliveries there are no problem. It's an area with thousands of middle class and upper income residents. So it's not out in the boonies or a true "rural" location.
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Old 01-22-2017, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,134 posts, read 23,028,696 times
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I've learned that I want to have all amenities within a few mile radius, and I'm working on moving back to that.

You will also need to consider the weather when thinking about that 30 minute drive. And the extra cost of gasoline and maintenance and wear and tear on the vehicle. And possibly having your car break down 20 minutes out and if you will have good cell phone coverage so you can call AAA, etc.

Also, depending on help is a pain.

I am really isolated where I am now, but when I think back about how convenient it was to have everything I needed within just a few miles, when I lived in Santa Clara, CA, I know that's what I want to go back to - a place where everything is convenient, including dentists and all manner of healthcare.

There's a lovely senior apartment complex for low-income seniors in Sonoma, CA. If you know where that is, it's right in the middle of wine country. Gorgeous, tourist spot. And 30 minutes to amenities. I have learned my lesson about gorgeous tourists spots too far from amenities. They're great places to visit...

Anything else is just too much work.
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Old 01-22-2017, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
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I just moved back to a town of 50,000 from a major metro. I'll go to to the store and can't find seemingly basic items. Food and other items are overpriced. There is very little going on here, especially in the winter, indoors. While I do enjoy being closer to family, there are plenty of mid-sized cities that are good compromises between metros ~2 million and small, dysfunctional towns like I'm in now.
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,203 posts, read 11,820,134 times
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From observation, I can't agree that it's as simple as "once you are in the car, what difference does it make?" I see older family and friends who are still ok driving and get out regularly yet still prefer to stay in a fairly close orbit of their homes, and even more importantly, become increasingly uncomfortable driving at night. Driving 5-10 minutes isn't the same as driving half an hour and what feels ok at age 65 may not work at 75.
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,425 posts, read 7,942,539 times
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We live in a village where you can walk about 15 minutes to the grocery store and pharmacy right across the street. There are restaurants within a 5 minute walk. The train is a block away. There's a DR's office and dentist within a 5 minute walk. There's even a mechanic down at the end of the block. We have a great bike tail and we can walk about a half an hour to the next towns. One has a movie theater. These are all great reasons to stay here in our old age, but there will come a time when walking down the street is too hard. Then it will be time for assisted living. Move some where that feels like home and enjoy it for as long as you can. If you want to live in the middle of nowhere then go for it. You can always work around the weather when you're retired.
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:35 AM
 
6,652 posts, read 3,764,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I've learned that I want to have all amenities within a few mile radius, and I'm working on moving back to that.

You will also need to consider the weather when thinking about that 30 minute drive. And the extra cost of gasoline and maintenance and wear and tear on the vehicle. And possibly having your car break down 20 minutes out and if you will have good cell phone coverage so you can call AAA, etc.

Also, depending on help is a pain.

I am really isolated where I am now, but when I think back about how convenient it was to have everything I needed within just a few miles, when I lived in Santa Clara, CA, I know that's what I want to go back to - a place where everything is convenient, including dentists and all manner of healthcare.

There's a lovely senior apartment complex for low-income seniors in Sonoma, CA. If you know where that is, it's right in the middle of wine country. Gorgeous, tourist spot. And 30 minutes to amenities. I have learned my lesson about gorgeous tourists spots too far from amenities. They're great places to visit...

Anything else is just too much work.
All good points. Thanks.
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:36 AM
 
6,652 posts, read 3,764,565 times
Reputation: 13748
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
From observation, I can't agree that it's as simple as "once you are in the car, what difference does it make?" I see older family and friends who are still ok driving and get out regularly yet still prefer to stay in a fairly close orbit of their homes, and even more importantly, become increasingly uncomfortable driving at night. Driving 5-10 minutes isn't the same as driving half an hour and what feels ok at age 65 may not work at 75.
Yes, well, I don't drive at night NOW. I have night blindness or something.
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,456 posts, read 1,158,755 times
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In searching for a relocation city and a home, we have been pondering the same question: "How far is too far to live from amenities?".

The criteria for each person are different and depend on several factors.

First is how long that one plan or expect to stay in the new location. One has to weigh the trade-offs between a better location which may not be suitable for health care needs in later years vs a compromised but more of a 'forever' location.

Secondly, one has to plan for unexpected life changes, health issues, loss of a spouse, support network etc. If you can no longer drive, does the new location has alternate transportation? Will you be able to find help with house/yard maintenance if you can not do it yourself? A couple may be perfectly happy living in a private or remote place but it will be a completely different world when your spouse is gone.

It is always a fine balance between accepting future changes and compromising today's living conditions for future needs.

For us, we have decide to compromise somewhat in finding our next home with regards to distance to amenities but not to the extent of living in a place foreign to our preferred way of living (privacy, nearby nature setting and outdoor activities). We (or one of us) may be forced into moving to a different place down the road (5, 10, 15 years or even shorter) but we are willing to accept future changes.
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,806 posts, read 4,854,199 times
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OP, what you are describing is virtually identical to where I live now (Tellico Village). We lived in a rural area prior to moving here, which I would call rural/suburban, so it's nothing new to us to drive 15 minutes to get to anything. We're now in a large subdivision (3500 homes) in a rural area, within 8 miles of two VERY small cities, but a half hour drive from an area with virtually everything. 8 miles to Walmart, 2-10 miles to groceries depending on where in the subdivision you live. The people who live here range in age up to their 80's and most still drive. For the few that don't drive, we do have a driving service that will take them to doctor's appts, etc for a very small donation. I guess some would not be happy here, if walking to everything is their optimal setting, this just wouldn't work, but for those who live here, which is mostly seniors, it works fine. We're happy to trade the city for natural beauty, a peaceful setting, virtually no crime, and a great way of life.
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,134 posts, read 23,028,696 times
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Just a little more food for thought...

For those considering moving initially somewhere until it doesn't work for them, then moving again... I have moved twice since retiring in November 2013. I'm really hoping this next move is my last. Moving is exhausting. Even if you can afford to pay people to pack and clean and drive, etc.

Plus, changing doctors and getting insurance set-up again in a new place is a huge pain. Getting settled in, establishing a new social network, etc. It was easier when I was young, but the older I get the more I dread it.

I think it's smart to try and pick your final destination from the get-go. There are no guarantees, of course, but if you can eliminate extra moves, that's what I suggest from personal experience.
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