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Old 01-23-2017, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pocopsonite View Post
In addition to the length of the drive, the type of road can make a big difference. I know people who have no problem driving on most roads, even 50-mph highways with a lot of traffic lights. But they do not feel comfortable on interstates. They hate the merging, and they are nervous driving above 55 mph.

Something to consider if the half-hour drive involves high-speed, limited-access highways.
High-speed?? Not in the United States except in the western part of Texas, where the speed limit on I-10 is 80 mph. That's not really "high-speed" either.

In the entire state of California there is no speed limit above 70, although lots of people drive faster than that, including me at age 72. It blows my mind how anyone could consider 70 "high-speed", or how anyone could be "nervous" driving above 55 mph. It's not only a mystery to me conceptually, I find it scary. If someone is nervous above 55 mph, I have to wonder if they are competent to drive at any speed. Remember that Ralph Nader book about Corvairs, "Unsafe at any Speed"? Well, unfortunately, there are drivers like that.

People "hate the merging" on freeways? Well, every time we change lanes on a surface street, there is merging. How is that any different? In point of fact, driving on freeways is easier than driving on surface streets because there is no cross-traffic on the former - everyone is going in the same direction. A little elementary traffic maneuver analysis confirms this.
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Old 01-23-2017, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,830 posts, read 4,940,887 times
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One thing to consider is that we'll likely have self-driving cars in about 10 years.

We'll also likely have robots to help us in the house. Japan Inc. is putting a lot of research into this area.
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Old 01-23-2017, 05:48 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,527,847 times
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I've met some people who retired and moved to their dream of a log house in the mountains. I'm in healthcare (and ag).

A few get to enjoy it. The learn to maintain their properties in the weather extremes, and seem to embrace that. Learn to deal with frequent power outages or being snowed in, and seem to enjoy sharing their survival stories. Others end up selling when their health requires frequent medical attention, or the isolation gets to be worrisome.

Happily, there are few tragedies. Where I am, even living in 'town,' in a popular place for retirees, seeing a specialist requires a drive of 2+ hours to either the north or south. Certainly isn't for everyone.
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Old 01-23-2017, 06:33 AM
 
Location: USA
6,223 posts, read 5,353,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
anywhere there is no public transportation can be too far if you are unable to drive . that is what turned us off to retiring in the pocono's where we had a 2nd home .
From my understanding the poconos can be pretty rural. As one ages, living in such a place can become quite a challenge.
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Old 01-23-2017, 06:38 AM
 
71,463 posts, read 71,629,249 times
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Yep , which is why once we put on our retirement hats everything we would want in retirement was right here in queens in nyc where we already lived . So we sold back in 2012 .
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,834 posts, read 14,341,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
I have never in my life lived far from amenities but am thinking of a house that is a bit far, for me, from certain types of amenities.

Lovely area, crime free, lots of retirees. Grocery stores, pharmacies 6 minutes away by car. A WalMart SuperCenter 11 minutes away (by car). An emergency clinic, and veterinarians are 10 mins away. This is pretty good.

But doctors, Mall, Target, Sam's Club, Hospitals, Best Buy, pet stores, things like that - those are 1/2 hour away.

I should mention that I'm gauging things by travel time by car. Mileage may be greater, since the house is semi-rural, but few traffic lights, and able to travel on main thoroughfares to get places. (The 1/2 hour mileage is between 15 and 20 miles, for most things.)

This would be fine for now, I suppose. But what about when I get to be 70, 75, 80, 85? Too far for a senior?

A cab would go out there to pick me up, if I would call one, I suppose. I'd have to wait a while for it to get there. Cabs aren't used much in the city, although they are there. (No Uber or Lyft.) There is no public transportation.

How far is too far for a senior?
My parents retired to a small town full of other retirees, but with many fewer amenities than what they had been used to. They adjusted, but they drove frequently to the larger town about 1/2 hour away. And it wasn't that large. I would never do retirement the way they did. One of the frustrations of living there was lack of decent restaurants and no coffee shops. Shopping was awful too. For those activities, you drove a half hour.

When my mom could no longer drive, it was impossible for her to live by herself. But if she had had to give up driving sooner, it would have been very, very hard for her to live in her town.
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Old 01-23-2017, 01:04 PM
 
8,974 posts, read 8,093,468 times
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My wife and I are 85 and 87. We live 1 mile from basic medical and a small trauma center hospital (both 2 years old replacing the old facilities), a large independent grocery and hardware store, tire store, feed store, and several restaurants. To Walmart, and big shopping and medical specialists, it is 50 miles by highway. We enjoy living in our small town.

Our home is a big contemporary 4 level home on 5 acres with 1 acre landscaped. We have a 500 foot lane, from the county road that separates our home from the best part of the town.

To make it possible to live here, we have a housekeeper come in 3 days a week to keep things up. We have a yard worker come in 1 day a week in season, who use our tractor mower to keep up the yard. In winter change the mowing deck to a blade, to take care of clearing snow.

I just placed a large order of non perishable foods and cleaning supplies from WalMart on line. We have found we save considerable on line, over WalMart store prices. We order about everything we need that is non perishable. Perishables we buy from our independent grocery. Small things we need right now from the hardware store here in town.

Things I have bought on line run from blades for the mower, the snow blade for the tractor, new chain for the chainsaw, and the list goes on and on. Why spend 2 to 3 hours travel time, often going to several stores to find what I want. Why spend 100+ miles on the car, when I know it costs 43 cents a mile to run our Explorer when every thing is counted in. Why tiring yourself out, when I can sit at a computer and go shopping. I have not been to the big city for 2 yeas plus to shop for anything. And I am typical with a lot of other locals.

For our small town, we have top medical care. 3 doctors. Two have been her since medical school over 25 years ago. We have one of the top rated medical systems in the country, that due to the quality they are one of the 7 hospital systems in the country that Mayo Clinic is affiliated with. They have ambulances, 2 medical helicopters they own, and 3 hospital owned twin turbo planes that go get people all over Montana, Southern Canada, Western half of the Dakotas, and Northern half of Wyoming. My daughter need to be moved from local hospital to Billings one day. They called the helicopter in, and what a crew. The flight nurse is ex military flight nurse, and what the nurses told me is the best nurse the whole system has. That lady took over her patient, and away they went. She has the reputation she has never lost a patient getting them to a big hospital. Watching her get my daughter ready to travel, I have never seen such efficiency before. Pilots moved the patient to the helicopter just across the street and they were out of there.

There are times we have to go to a specialist 50 miles away, but we can both still drive safely and no big city traffic to worry about. If we don't feel like driving, our housekeeper is on standby in an emergency to drive us where we need to go.

We know we should not go up and down stairs, so we have 3 chairlifts that move us safely between floors. We have installed safety grab bars in showers, by toilets, etc., so we are safe in this big house. One reason we keep it, is when we have company, they can stay here with us, and no one is crowded.

Our cell phones are special phones, with a button that connects us with emergency services of any kind we need, whether at home or away. With GPS built into the phones, the emergency crews know how to find us if ever in need.

Older people can live anywhere they want, if they are choose well in selecting where they can get the services one needs.
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Old 01-23-2017, 05:07 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,126,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
I have never in my life lived far from amenities but am thinking of a house that is a bit far, for me, from certain types of amenities.

Lovely area, crime free, lots of retirees. Grocery stores, pharmacies 6 minutes away by car. A WalMart SuperCenter 11 minutes away (by car). An emergency clinic, and veterinarians are 10 mins away. This is pretty good.

But doctors, Mall, Target, Sam's Club, Hospitals, Best Buy, pet stores, things like that - those are 1/2 hour away.

I should mention that I'm gauging things by travel time by car. Mileage may be greater, since the house is semi-rural, but few traffic lights, and able to travel on main thoroughfares to get places. (The 1/2 hour mileage is between 15 and 20 miles, for most things.)

This would be fine for now, I suppose. But what about when I get to be 70, 75, 80, 85? Too far for a senior?

A cab would go out there to pick me up, if I would call one, I suppose. I'd have to wait a while for it to get there. Cabs aren't used much in the city, although they are there. (No Uber or Lyft.) There is no public transportation.

How far is too far for a senior?
5 minutes. That's by car.

Ideally, 5 minutes walking.
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Old 01-23-2017, 05:16 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,126,238 times
Reputation: 10910
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
For us. Ages 68/59. Now in very good health.
In the City & County of Denver.
We drive, but have easy access to: Car2Go, Uber, taxis, buses.
We went for a medium length drive today: 5.1 miles.
We can walk to 4 supermarkets, 100 restaurants. Walk Score of 90.
Kaiser is 4 miles away which was handy when I had to do chemo.
Our property taxes are reasonable at 0.5% of market value. We get many services.
This.

I'm thinking 0.4 miles would be good especially if doing chemo.

There was this morning drive time talk radio guy describing one of the "longest" drives he ever experienced, whilst undergoing chemo. He described asking his wife to stop about 25 times along the way and I don't think I need to give any more details here.
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Old 01-23-2017, 06:18 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,676 posts, read 2,222,849 times
Reputation: 5213
After 22 years of being within 5 minutes of grocery stores, pharmacies, hospital, restaurants and all shopping needs and 10-15 minutes of all our physicians, we have decided that we don't want to be much further out when we relocate to Tennessee. So we are keeping our fingers crossed on a couple of houses we are going to look at next week that are about 10 minutes from everything we would need, including the local university. One of them is on 1.5 acres which would give us nice elbow room along with being convenient to everything. But as we get older, I think I would shade toward trading elbow room for convenience.
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