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Old 01-25-2017, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,640,506 times
Reputation: 27762

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tominftl View Post
This is a good question and more seniors need to think about this before moving to an area just because it's quiet. Seniors need things close by especially a hospital that is large enough to take care of cardiac and other problems. Nice to have a decent airport also to visit friends and family....
Agreed. Being here in Tennessee, we get a lot of inquiries on C-D from people in rich, urban, coastal areas looking to retire for a piece of the "quiet life." Many are used to having a wide selection at their virtual fingertips, oftentimes with public transport.

I'm not retired, but the lack of amenities here is frustrating after having lived in the suburbs of a two million metro for three years. I am an hour and a half from a Costco - there, I had two within fifteen minutes. We have one dumpy Kroger in this town, Walmart, several stores of a regional chain called Food City, and a few "salvage" grocers. In Indianapolis, I probably had ten quality grocers within five minutes of my apartment. We have one decent gym in this town - in Indy, there were numerous options. Looking for ethnic cuisine? Probably not available here. Get to where you can't drive? There really are no options outside a few core city neighborhoods.

Yes, the pace of life is slower, but I've come to terms that, at this stage of my life, I need a cohesive (we're close to this in population, but it's strewn over three cities that acted as feuding fiefdoms, so it's dysfunctional) metro of 500,000+, likely pushing closer to a million, to have the amenities I deem necessary.

As it stands now, a lot of my consumer spending is done either online or in Asheville, NC/Knoxville, TN due to poor retail amenities (lack of selection, high prices). That's not even counting things like lack of public events/things to do inside during the winter, or senior specific concerns.
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Old 01-25-2017, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,309 posts, read 12,542,530 times
Reputation: 19551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I live in a town of 50,000 that has a median age of 44, with many seniors and relatively few younger people. There is a local "senior center" that does retreats and activities, but does not offer a service like this to my knowledge. We have a municipal bus system with discounted fares for seniors, but it only runs in certain places in the core city.

People outside the core city are pretty much on their own.
Unless your state turns down federal funding for religious reasons, there are rides available for seniors for doctor, dentist, and grocery shopping. Call your county senior services department for details.
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Old 01-25-2017, 11:54 AM
 
Location: equator
3,494 posts, read 1,548,932 times
Reputation: 8663
Well, I guess half an hour is too far for most people. That seems to be why we are having such a hard time selling our red-rock paradise in a tiny community of 400. The community aged since the 70's when it started and now they are no younger people there. Our age group started to move out, evidently because they felt too far from services.


I was fine with driving 30 min. to town but it was an all-day event by the time we went to a dozen places to get it all done in one trip. So we tried to keep it to once a week. The gorgeous river road is harrowing with no guard rails so we avoided being out at night. That kind of curtails social events.


There are many die-hard retirees left there and I admire their resilience. We were 45 min. from the hospital and 2 hours from major shopping or trauma centers. I never worried about that before anything happened....but when it does, perspectives change....
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Old 01-25-2017, 12:14 PM
 
71,867 posts, read 71,942,576 times
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times do change . when we bought the pocono house i loved hunting and fishing and the outdoors . but as we got closer to retiring there i am realizing all the things that will be important to us as we age it lacked . so we sold it .
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Old 01-25-2017, 12:24 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,626 posts, read 3,693,281 times
Reputation: 12453
It all depends on what people want or can adapt to. I live pretty much out in the high desert with a well and septic system...but not off the grid. I have one neighbor close by and a few others I can see and holler at if need be. Urgent care is six miles away. A major hospital is probably 10-12 miles away and another one a little closer. Grocery store and Walgreens is about five miles away (with a Starbucks!) My bank is maybe 7 miles away, but across the river. My local brew-pub is about eight miles away in a small town...along with a few nice café/restaurants. Nothing is in walking distance (at my age) but that's fine and a compromise I'm willing to make. I have what some would call a 'million dollar view' from my front porch and a bocce court next to the house. I technically live in a city but you wouldn't know it. If I walked a mile I'd be halfway to the highway. When I moved here I bought some land and was going to be a pioneer -- build a house and be off by myself. But I was 65 then and decided that I probably needed to be a little closer to civilization so this is a compromise from what I was originally looking at.


My other preference would be to live in a small hill town in Umbria and walk to the market every day and pick up the day's fresh bread and veggies, stop at a local bar for coffee or maybe a glass of wine on my way back home. That ain't gonna happen.


I've known people who were extreme urbanites and were content to live in a high-rise apartment or one-room studio in the heart of the city. My father-in-law was one. Public transportation and foot-power were his primary modes of getting around but he had a car. This was what he wanted and he had a small circle of friends in his building. He cooked on a hot plate and a toaster oven and was happy...but he was no closer to a doctor or hospital than I am and had to go farther out for a supermarket because there were none in the central city. He was content with that arrangement.
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Old 01-25-2017, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,309 posts, read 12,542,530 times
Reputation: 19551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Agreed. Being here in Tennessee, we get a lot of inquiries on C-D from people in rich, urban, coastal areas looking to retire for a piece of the "quiet life." Many are used to having a wide selection at their virtual fingertips, oftentimes with public transport.

I'm not retired, but the lack of amenities here is frustrating after having lived in the suburbs of a two million metro for three years. I am an hour and a half from a Costco - there, I had two within fifteen minutes. We have one dumpy Kroger in this town, Walmart, several stores of a regional chain called Food City, and a few "salvage" grocers. In Indianapolis, I probably had ten quality grocers within five minutes of my apartment. We have one decent gym in this town - in Indy, there were numerous options. Looking for ethnic cuisine? Probably not available here. Get to where you can't drive? There really are no options outside a few core city neighborhoods.

Yes, the pace of life is slower, but I've come to terms that, at this stage of my life, I need a cohesive (we're close to this in population, but it's strewn over three cities that acted as feuding fiefdoms, so it's dysfunctional) metro of 500,000+, likely pushing closer to a million, to have the amenities I deem necessary.

As it stands now, a lot of my consumer spending is done either online or in Asheville, NC/Knoxville, TN due to poor retail amenities (lack of selection, high prices). That's not even counting things like lack of public events/things to do inside during the winter, or senior specific concerns.
By the time you retire, hopefully you will have dealt with your consumer issues. Once you have all the "stuff" you need, you won't care if Costco even exists. Sort of. It's cheap to buy hearing aids and eyeglasses at Costco, but making the drive 3 or 4 times a year is not a big deal.

The culture problem is more serious, and may require a move. You have apparently landed in a town that is hostile to minorities. My nearest town is 22,000 people, but I can go out for Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese, Chinese, Mexican, Greek, Jewish, Indian or Italian food any time I want. There are also the usual fast food chains. When you discriminate against minorities you also discriminate against their culture. You are going to have to shop for a community that is not so closed and boring. I doubt there's any way to fix the Baptists, so leave them to their white bread and move on.
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Old 01-25-2017, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,663 posts, read 1,531,914 times
Reputation: 3650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Agreed. Being here in Tennessee, we get a lot of inquiries on C-D from people in rich, urban, coastal areas looking to retire for a piece of the "quiet life." Many are used to having a wide selection at their virtual fingertips, oftentimes with public transport.

I'm not retired, but the lack of amenities here is frustrating after having lived in the suburbs of a two million metro for three years. I am an hour and a half from a Costco - there, I had two within fifteen minutes. We have one dumpy Kroger in this town, Walmart, several stores of a regional chain called Food City, and a few "salvage" grocers. In Indianapolis, I probably had ten quality grocers within five minutes of my apartment. We have one decent gym in this town - in Indy, there were numerous options. Looking for ethnic cuisine? Probably not available here. Get to where you can't drive? There really are no options outside a few core city neighborhoods.

Yes, the pace of life is slower, but I've come to terms that, at this stage of my life, I need a cohesive (we're close to this in population, but it's strewn over three cities that acted as feuding fiefdoms, so it's dysfunctional) metro of 500,000+, likely pushing closer to a million, to have the amenities I deem necessary.

As it stands now, a lot of my consumer spending is done either online or in Asheville, NC/Knoxville, TN due to poor retail amenities (lack of selection, high prices). That's not even counting things like lack of public events/things to do inside during the winter, or senior specific concerns.
Aren't you in Kingsport with Johnson City 30 minutes away? Johnson city has The Fresh Market, Earth Fare, Aldi, 2 Krogers, a Sam's Club, etc. And several ethnic restaurants that get high ratings: Thai, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Italian and Kingsport seems to also have a few. I'm sure it's not Indianapolis but you are close to the mountains with much nicer weather. My federal agency has seven field offices. The most popular is Oak Ridge, TN - lots of people want to move there because it is family oriented, lower crime, and less expensive. Not California outside San Francisco or Washington DC or Las Vegas, NV but Oak Ridge!
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Old 01-25-2017, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,466,890 times
Reputation: 15684
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
This would be fine for now, I suppose. But what about when I get to be 70, 75, 80, 85? Too far for a senior?
There is a reasonable chance your shopping habits would change as you age. For example, I have not been to a mall or a Target in well over 10 years. No need.

Online purchases with delivery to my house covers most everything.

Access to doctors is a bigger issue as we age.
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Old 01-25-2017, 05:52 PM
 
5,432 posts, read 3,462,764 times
Reputation: 13714
I haven't been in a store in 6 or 7 years. Buy everything online. Walmart.com, Target.com, Amazon.com, Jet.com etc and clothing websites.

Use USPS.com for buying stamps, and making mailing labels & mailing packages. USPS will pick up packages at your house or apt for free - schedule a free pickup at USPS.com

And shopping habits can change a lot as you age.

I do like having three major large grocery stores in my locale which offer online grocery shopping and delivery.

Have your medical prescriptions delivered free by USPS (U.S. Postal Service) from Walmart.com free Mail Home Delivery (in Pharmacy section on their website) or delivered free by USPS through your Part D Drug Prescription provider such as Humana.com.

For those with a dog, mail delivery for dog food is available at lots of places online
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Old 01-25-2017, 05:56 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,225 posts, read 14,955,586 times
Reputation: 14983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I don't want my residence to be much more than ten minutes from groceries, Walmart, family doctor, etc.
In the northeast corner of the state, you are not in a small town.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
There is a reasonable chance your shopping habits would change as you age. For example, I have not been to a mall or a Target in well over 10 years. No need.

Online purchases with delivery to my house covers most everything.

Access to doctors is a bigger issue as we age.

I don't mall shop - but never did. What I do a lot of now is online shopping.

No need to leave my dogs and cats and husband or the pool in the summer.

Today I arranged for free shipping for dog food. My dogs eat food i can only get at PetSmart or Petco - and they are an hour away. So now it will be delivered. Yippee.
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