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Old 01-26-2017, 01:23 PM
 
6,623 posts, read 3,750,159 times
Reputation: 13698

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
Hardly. Boomers paid for Medicare Part A only. IOW, catastrophic coverage. Good try, though.
Medicare Part A IS Medicare. Nice try, though.
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Old 01-26-2017, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,660 posts, read 1,525,919 times
Reputation: 3640
Tax credits often help the working class. There are Refundable Tax Credits that allow you to get more money back than you pay in for taxes. These include the EITC, child Tax Credit, Child and Dependent Care Credit, and Retirement Savings Contribution Credit. As a "wealthy" person, my only tax credit was less than $200 for replacing a broken window shade with a more energy efficient shade and that credit is no longer available.
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Old 01-26-2017, 01:37 PM
 
6,623 posts, read 3,750,159 times
Reputation: 13698
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Seven years ago, Blue Cross refused to give me health insurance just because I had high blood pressure - which is always normal blood pressure because I take medication for it. And because I have osteoarthritis.

I could not believe Blue Cross refused over such common ailments which millions of people have, particularly the blood pressure.

I thought insurance companies would refuse just in the case of severe ailments. (although osteoarthritis can be severe) I thought pre-existing conditions meant things like cancer, advanced COPD, etc.
Hmmmm. Insurance companies usually don't refuse insureds for osteoarthritis, which is a normal arthritis that the majority of people over age 45 in the country have/get. Maybe yours was severe. I've had osteoarthritis for many years, but take no medicine for it and have no physical limitations because of it, except maybe if I wanted to take up marathon running (which I wouldn't do, arthiritis or no arthritis).

I had health ins. before the ACA, and had osteoarthritis. United Health Care, I think it was.

Blue Cross and others may do this in areas where there isn't much choice for people.

I can understand hbp. People with hbp are at much greater risk of having a stroke, which is a very expensive condition to treat, and lasts a lifetime. It also is critical to get medication for that, which lasts a lifetime, often. (It doesn't matter that your medication keeps it in check. You still have hbp.)

Hbp IS a serious condition. It's so common that I think some people assume it's not that serious. Not true. It does a lot of damage to the insides of the arteries. It tears them up, so that the sides look all ragged (I saw some pics on a tv show.)

When a person starts getting hbp, it's important to start doing every natural thing possible to turn that around. That starts with walking every day. No exceptions. That will usually very quickly lower blood pressure. Then change eating habits. It is fixable in the early stages. As is diabetes type 2. But people are so used to taking pills, that that's their choice of fix.

I take my bp at home often. I walk almost every day. If I see my bp tick up, when that happens, I'll start extreme measures, like walking more and more often, changing my eating habits.
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Old 01-26-2017, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,218,356 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
Medicare Part A IS Medicare. Nice try, though.
Well, of course Part A is Medicare. It is the only part of Medicare that was prepaid for through the withholding of FICA taxes. Because wage earners did not prepay for Medicare Part B they cannot argue they are entitled to a refund. Can they argue they are ENTITLED to additional coverage? Of course. Legally, it is an entitlement. For whatever that's worth.
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Old 01-26-2017, 01:53 PM
 
Location: next up where ever I go
588 posts, read 344,870 times
Reputation: 2087
I am somewhat fortunate to have a savings that most do not share in this country due to the very advantageous marriage to a man that had a very sellable skill (physician) and I had the knowledge and foresight to invest and safe everything we could because I saw retirement looming. At the time I was 50 and he was 45. No, I do not have a pension, worked professionally as a paralegal as my main working career (never will see people the same ever after that gig) and did not make the money that the upper middle class does. That's OK. I came from nothing and I feel I achieved much on so many levels.

That being said...I am one of many, who, through no fault of my own, had parents that needed care, so I cared for them without pay, I was single most of my life so I did not have the advantage of a two income family, all education, finding my own way, in my new country (yes, my parents are immigrants and I just will not go there given the brewing immigration horror that I am seeing in this country) I did without generations of help and guidance located in this country.

My point...I am now almost 62 with SS coming fast down the lane but at only $10,000 a year because of the relatively low paid jobs I had to take and the time taken off to care for my parents, and my inherited illness; I see in the next three years my healthcare drying up because I will either forego healthcare now to be able to sustain myself in my later 60s and beyond with the savings that I have... or I will pay usury payments for healthcare that will deplete my savings and cause me to be without care or hearth and home when I run out of money.

So the issue becomes: Pay out now or in the near future for healthcare and then find myself broke at 70 and beyond.

So how will I live going forward. I can only hope that myself and a whole lot of other Boomers will find some sort of safety net for us as we age in this glorious country. I consider myself collateral damage, bpollen, and yes I do think that "they" do understand.
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Old 01-26-2017, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,549,506 times
Reputation: 16772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
A key phrase to remember from Trump's campaign is "repeal and replace."

The traditional Republican point of view has simply been to repeal it, but what Trump appears to want to do is to replace Obamacare with some form of Trumpcare, another government run or at least facilitated health insurance scheme.
I think the replace part got added when he figured out a LOT of his own would be hurt by his following ieological rules. And if suddenly a whole bunch of people who were *happy* with their new health insurence, even if not perfect, blamed him and his short sided brain for losing it, along with others of his kind. A lot of the congressional sorts still haven't figured that out.

My preexisting condition has been around for years, along with the problems it makes, and I HONOR our last president (and miss him) for making it a priority. This joke of a president currently playing at it only sees concequences, intended or not, when someone starts screaming in his twitter ridden ear.
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Old 01-26-2017, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
6,633 posts, read 5,055,513 times
Reputation: 4290
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
Hmmmm. Insurance companies usually don't refuse insureds for osteoarthritis, which is a normal arthritis that the majority of people over age 45 in the country have/get. Maybe yours was severe. I've had osteoarthritis for many years, but take no medicine for it and have no physical limitations because of it, except maybe if I wanted to take up marathon running (which I wouldn't do, arthiritis or no arthritis).
They often denied coverage for a combination of chronic conditions. If you failed to reveal even one, they could deny you coverage retroactively. They also imposed annual and lifetime caps on coverage. Also, precipitous premium increases and/or coverage slashes in the individual market were very common prior to the ACA, rendering insurance unaffordable for many. If they can force you to enroll in a high-risk pool or spend-down to get onto Medicaid, that's a win-win for them, if not for you.
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Old 01-26-2017, 04:12 PM
 
249 posts, read 197,175 times
Reputation: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMKSarah View Post
I am somewhat fortunate to have a savings that most do not share in this country due to the very advantageous marriage to a man that had a very sellable skill (physician) and I had the knowledge and foresight to invest and safe everything we could because I saw retirement looming. At the time I was 50 and he was 45. No, I do not have a pension, worked professionally as a paralegal as my main working career (never will see people the same ever after that gig) and did not make the money that the upper middle class does. That's OK. I came from nothing and I feel I achieved much on so many levels.

That being said...I am one of many, who, through no fault of my own, had parents that needed care, so I cared for them without pay, I was single most of my life so I did not have the advantage of a two income family, all education, finding my own way, in my new country (yes, my parents are immigrants and I just will not go there given the brewing immigration horror that I am seeing in this country) I did without generations of help and guidance located in this country.

My point...I am now almost 62 with SS coming fast down the lane but at only $10,000 a year because of the relatively low paid jobs I had to take and the time taken off to care for my parents, and my inherited illness; I see in the next three years my healthcare drying up because I will either forego healthcare now to be able to sustain myself in my later 60s and beyond with the savings that I have... or I will pay usury payments for healthcare that will deplete my savings and cause me to be without care or hearth and home when I run out of money.

So the issue becomes: Pay out now or in the near future for healthcare and then find myself broke at 70 and beyond.

So how will I live going forward. I can only hope that myself and a whole lot of other Boomers will find some sort of safety net for us as we age in this glorious country. I consider myself collateral damage, bpollen, and yes I do think that "they" do understand.
I'm not understanding your concern. At age 65 you will enroll on Medicare it is your choice to choose the best plan for you. The other things you mention aren't important regarding your Medicare coverage at age 65. Am I missing something?
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Old 01-26-2017, 04:37 PM
 
Location: next up where ever I go
588 posts, read 344,870 times
Reputation: 2087
Yes, CMarlin,

You are missing my age of 61 through 64 and the costs of an unintended, however, possible health issue to show itself i.e. heart, cancer, continued lack of the ability to use my hands (a inherited disease since puberty).


Please be specific as to what are MY concerns so that I may address your reasoning.
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Old 01-26-2017, 05:47 PM
 
3,531 posts, read 1,776,416 times
Reputation: 6233
If you really think that you're going to be poor for the rest of your life you need to relocate to a forever blue state. I'm in NY and I think it's a good place if you are rich or poor, it's not for middle class people.
Anyway, you can get a decent apartment in the Rochester, Albany, Buffalo area. This state has a huge safety net. Health care isn't going anywhere here.
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