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Old 01-30-2017, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,754 posts, read 26,809,877 times
Reputation: 20408

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I don't have regular hours in my daily job, which makes a second job hard (I cannot say when I will be done the day) and I am currently working at a job 90 minutes from my home because there's nothing closer to me at the moment, living out of a suitcase and running home 2 days a week to make sure my plants don't die and bring my mail in. Aside from that, I had major back surgery 2 months ago, and am just getting back to work after being unable to for 6 months, during which time I had to use a good portion of my savings to live (I am a 1099 and did not qualify for state disability...I had a private plan but it didn't pay enough to cover my bills, especially because I had $14,000 in co-pays from the entire incident. Before you say I live too high, I have an apartment which is less than $800 a month, and just bought a 2009 Hyundai, after my '98 Acura finally died with 315,000 miles...just saying, it's not always as easy as you think.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
This is a misconception that many people without kids have. Just because you don't have them doesn't mean you can get a second job or work OT. I've worked at places where if the primary job discovered and employee was working at a second job they would be fired. Sometimes health issues don't allow for someone to work two jobs. It may be that the person has to take care of an elderly parent after work or works odd hours that wouldn't allow a second job.

Having or not having kids doesn't always determine the ability to work a second job.
Not going to say it is easy or that it will work for every situation. Many people though do have the ability to work more than they are working now. The truth is most people do not work as much as they can work.

Many people also do not look at what they can do. All of us here are more than likely sitting at a computer somewhere wasting time on CDF. This is time that we could be doing something else to make money. Will it be easy? No it won't.

I have worked multiple jobs when I was single and had no kids. I also worked multiple jobs with kids. I also worked a full time job, a part time job, with kids while I was working on a degree.

The truth is that success happens to those that work 80 plus hours a week. I don't know of any successful people that work a 40 hour work week. I know a lot of successful people that work 80 hour work weeks. I know some that work over 100 hours a week.
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Old 01-30-2017, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,696,516 times
Reputation: 35450
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
Not going to say it is easy or that it will work for every situation. Many people though do have the ability to work more than they are working now. The truth is most people do not work as much as they can work.

Many people also do not look at what they can do. All of us here are more than likely sitting at a computer somewhere wasting time on CDF. This is time that we could be doing something else to make money. Will it be easy? No it won't.

I have worked multiple jobs when I was single and had no kids. I also worked multiple jobs with kids. I also worked a full time job, a part time job, with kids while I was working on a degree.

The truth is that success happens to those that work 80 plus hours a week. I don't know of any successful people that work a 40 hour work week. I know a lot of successful people that work 80 hour work weeks. I know some that work over 100 hours a week.
I agree, if conditions are right people can work multiple jobs if they want whether they do or do not have kids. All I was trying to point out that your comment "Since you are single and have no kids, you could get a second job or work overtime, save and invest the money from the second job and maybe meet your retirement goals," is not accurate. Not having kids is not a given that people can work extra hours or jobs. It all depends upon their situation.
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Old 01-30-2017, 03:40 PM
 
20,649 posts, read 16,687,786 times
Reputation: 38821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I agree, if conditions are right people can work multiple jobs if they want whether they do or do not have kids. All I was trying to point out that your comment "Since you are single and have no kids, you could get a second job or work overtime, save and invest the money from the second job and maybe meet your retirement goals," is not accurate. Not having kids is not a given that people can work extra hours or jobs. It all depends upon their situation.
Thank you. It's pretty hard to get a second job when the first is 90 miles away and I have no idea what time I'll be done until I see my caseload that day.
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Old 01-31-2017, 12:22 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,668 posts, read 40,039,994 times
Reputation: 23823
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
Thank you. It's pretty hard to get a second job when the first is 90 miles away and I have no idea what time I'll be done until I see my caseload that day.
and you ALWAYS work ALL weekend?


I have usually used WEEKENDS (and nights) to augment my 'real-job' (60+ hrs / week)

168 hrs / week, fit it in.... (I have been on task for 18.2 hrs today (no breaks, minimal food), still plenty of time left in the day, I have a lot more things to get done.)
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Old 01-31-2017, 10:49 AM
 
20,649 posts, read 16,687,786 times
Reputation: 38821
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
and you ALWAYS work ALL weekend?


I have usually used WEEKENDS (and nights) to augment my 'real-job' (60+ hrs / week)

168 hrs / week, fit it in.... (I have been on task for 18.2 hrs today (no breaks, minimal food), still plenty of time left in the day, I have a lot more things to get done.)




It doesn't matter, I give up with you, you are only going to compare everyone's life with your own and call the rest of us lazy.
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Old 01-31-2017, 11:10 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,668 posts, read 40,039,994 times
Reputation: 23823
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
It doesn't matter, I give up with you, you are only going to compare everyone's life with your own and call the rest of us lazy.
Be careful to NEVER compare your life to anyone else, or you fall down the slippery slope. You are equipped, purposed, and capable to do ONLY what you envision / choose, or are physically limited to do.

Do it as you are able.

You can review 15k posts, but won't find me imposing my values / work ethic as mandatory on anyone, just an example, that I have had to rise far higher than I ever felt capable, often out of necessity to serve others.

You will do what you are called to do and deal with the results. We all do! You get to fill in the details and plan the turns in your path, but you are not the author, nor am I.
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Old 01-31-2017, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,754 posts, read 26,809,877 times
Reputation: 20408
I am completely sorry that I can not solve any problems by offering what I have done and what others have done. It is difficult to compete against excuses. When someone is convinced that an excuse will keep them from accomplishing something then the excuse wins every time.
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Old 02-01-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,740 posts, read 4,758,012 times
Reputation: 28377
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
OP here. Again let me emphasize that my question I posed is not a financial one. My question is who will help us get there? Let's say we are in our 80's and I break a hip or something and we have to move or we go to assisted living home. My wife cannot pack up our house, sell what we don't want, make endless runs to the Goodwill, etc to get rid of stuff. We have no kids. Relatives all live in other states and have busy lives. All our friends are about our age, so we cannot expect them to break their backs either. We can hire people but having strangers sort through our stuff to pack it all seems risky to me.

It was really hard on us when we retired and moved out of our house. It is a lot of work to downsize and move. Downsizing is very personal because you get rid of so much personal stuff. I cannot imagine doing that again when we are in our 80's without a lot of help.
I'm sorry but what to do seems obvious to me.

My MIL started downsizing years before she moved. Even so, we filled a couple of 1-800-GOT-JUNK trucks with things Goodwill wouldn't take.

You don't wait until the day of. You start now. You do a bit at a time.

And stop accumulating stuff. If you're a collector, find something else satisfying to do.

It seems obvious to me that I (not we) will be moving within a year. I'm throwing out, donating, etc. right now, especially all the stuff I didn't want to accept but people foisted on me anyway.

If it motivates you, find out how much U-Haul charges for their packing crew and calculate how much you're saving with every run to the thrift store or every full dumpster.
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Old 02-01-2017, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,632,423 times
Reputation: 27754
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
You are single, no kids, and you know right now that you will not have the money you need for retirement.

You have choices.

1. You could continue on with how things are going, do nothing and accomplish not having any money when you retire.

2. Since you are single and have no kids, you could get a second job or work overtime, save and invest the money from the second job and maybe meet your retirement goals.

3. Start a business on the side that will not only bring you extra income but you can continue to run it after you are retired or sell it and have money from the sale of the business and the investment income that it provided prior to the sale.

I know a couple that faced what you are talking about, few opportunities for saving. They did have kids and wanted a better life for the kids. The husband took on a second job and still works there. He works two full time jobs. The mom works full time as well. Their kids are all grown and they continue to work. Both of them work at the hospital where I work and he works at Costco as well. Sometimes you just need to do what you got to do.
It's not always that easy.

Many salaried jobs do not have defined hours. I work in IT, and the last job I had, I was on call all the time. You might not get a call for a week, then be working all week after hours. It wasn't necessarily the amount of hours worked that was the problem, but the fact that you couldn't plan anything in advance. I had a difficult time even going out of town on day trips.

Other corporate cultures have long hours as a norm. Two jobs ago, there were teams frequently working 60-80 weeks. If you're working that much, most people are going to be too tired to do more.

Some employers are very strongly against moonlighting of any kind, or have noncompete clauses.
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Old 02-01-2017, 01:06 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,668 posts, read 40,039,994 times
Reputation: 23823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
It's not always that easy.

... teams frequently working 60-80 weeks. If you're working that much, most people are going to be too tired to do more.

Some employers are very strongly against moonlighting of any kind, or have noncompete clauses.
Working (for others).
If you are working too much, you are getting Overtime, if not, get a job that compensates for actual hours worked.

If you are stuck on salary, find a different career field or a different position (skilled trades usually pays well for time invested).

If you have an employer that has a "no-moonlighting' clause, then they better be paying you REAL well, especially if 'on call'.

You should NEVER work 2 jobs at same time in a similar industries (I.e. conflict of interest / non-compete). (how BORING!) yuck, one job at a time in a particular field is enough to get sick of REAL quick.

Multiple jobs gives you LOTS of variety, recharge, opportunities for pay increases and career changes. And it helps to narrow down the choices for most effectively using your time.
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