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Old 02-11-2017, 08:26 PM
 
1,013 posts, read 1,273,361 times
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couldn't a scammer ask any question where you would answer in the affirmative? "is this john doe? "...ect
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:26 PM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,077,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justinbro2002 View Post
couldn't a scammer ask any question where you would answer in the affirmative? "is this john doe? "...ect
Yep, that's why if you take such calls, you shouldn't respond at all but just hang up. I'm frankly puzzled why in this era of caller id anyone would answer the calls to start with.
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:52 PM
Status: "North of Palm Trees, South of High Taxes" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,621 posts, read 6,704,636 times
Reputation: 4933
The answer to "Can you hear me now is?" is NOOOOO!
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Old 02-12-2017, 04:39 AM
 
6,311 posts, read 4,757,627 times
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There is indeed a scam here. The scam is the nonsense article designed to grab your attention and increase the audience.


Using a recording of you saying "yes" is not going to get any scammer very far and it would not even be worth the effort. Certainly if the crooks already have your credit card information, they can run up charges without your words on a recording.
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Old 02-12-2017, 07:22 AM
 
2,952 posts, read 1,644,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maus View Post
The article says basically in a nutshell do not say "yes" to someone who is calling you and you are not fully aware of who the caller is. The scammer can then used your recorded voice against you to make unauthorized credit card charges via telephone.
Sorry to have to use your post to ask this.

Heard of this scam several times on the news. I rarely get charges on my credit card that are scam but when I do, I contest them and win. Never lost.

Not understanding how a simple 'yes' can take someone so far. Do they have the CC#, making a questionable charge?

My credit card company calls me if something is odd but asks me numerous questions like last 4 digit of SS#. mother's maiden name, etc. This 'yes' would never fly with them.

Maybe it works with debit cards, which I don't have.

Not that we shouldn't be diligent with scammers or follow this advice. But I'm seeing all kind of issues that these people wouldn't 'win' with.

If they spent the time they waste coming up with scams, working of something legit, they'd might have a real business. Obviously they have some creative skills, but they are just using them for bad.
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Old 02-12-2017, 09:40 AM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,130 posts, read 17,167,980 times
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Most of the "Yes" scam's are aim'ed at Phones Billing, where they can use the "Yes" to force a charge on to your phone bill, for "Add On" services. The "Add On" named service will often look like a Tax, or Phone company charge, (But most phone companies separate them out on the bill now to show its a 3rd party add on service)

Your phone company also gets a percentage of the $'s for providing billing services. The Scam works for about 1-2 month before the phone company revokes there authorization to push "Add On" services to them.

Phone companies are also now holding the $'s from add on services for a 2-3 months before they send it on, to allow for "ChargeBacks" and For ChargeBack investigations.
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Old 02-12-2017, 09:59 AM
 
9,151 posts, read 7,226,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
The answer to "Can you hear me now is?" is NOOOOO!
When I mistakenly answer one of these calls I sit there and say Hello? Hello? Hello? until they hang up. I always hope that if it's a real person they will get annoyed and take my number off of their re-call list.

So I guess my answer to the question is no, but phrased as Hello?
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Old 02-12-2017, 12:07 PM
 
990 posts, read 1,526,872 times
Reputation: 2405
We were getting those "can you hear me?" calls earlier last year. We thought they were odd, but our policy is to never answer the phone unless we know who's calling. We let the machine pick up.

We signed up for nomorobo (no more robot calls) a few months ago. It's amazing how many times our phone rings once and the service just cuts it off. It also blocks faked caller IDs.
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Old 02-12-2017, 05:48 PM
 
1,725 posts, read 2,285,883 times
Reputation: 2642
Quote:
Originally Posted by maus View Post
What a good idea to share this, no kudzu. I haven't heard yet of this angle.

The article says basically in a nutshell do not say "yes" to someone who is calling you and you are not fully aware of who the caller is. The scammer can then used your recorded voice against you to make unauthorized credit card charges via telephone.

I'm somewhat familiar with fraudulent phone calls. And sadly, there is so much fraud going on by phone, it's very scary to think about how much money is stolen. Senior citizens are more often targeted and have been a while even before the wide spread usage of the Internet. It's a good thing now that most senior people now use the Internet and stay more informed on such possible variations of phone scams.
They can only do that if they have your credit card number. If they have a CC#, you have much more to worry about than saying "Yes." If they tell you you are obligated because you said "yes" that is a bluff. But I have fun with them, when they ask if my name is ****, do I live at **** etc. I reply with a tone of great enthusiasm and cooperation, "Nothing has changed!" I repeat that as often as they ask.

Eventually they get tired and hang up.

I have never lost a dime to these scumbags.

Don in Austin
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Old 02-12-2017, 05:50 PM
 
1,725 posts, read 2,285,883 times
Reputation: 2642
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
Most of the "Yes" scam's are aim'ed at Phones Billing, where they can use the "Yes" to force a charge on to your phone bill, for "Add On" services. The "Add On" named service will often look like a Tax, or Phone company charge, (But most phone companies separate them out on the bill now to show its a 3rd party add on service)

Your phone company also gets a percentage of the $'s for providing billing services. The Scam works for about 1-2 month before the phone company revokes there authorization to push "Add On" services to them.

Phone companies are also now holding the $'s from add on services for a 2-3 months before they send it on, to allow for "ChargeBacks" and For ChargeBack investigations.
I have always been able to get my phone carrier, whether cell or landline to remove such charges.

Don in Austin
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