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Old 02-05-2017, 05:34 PM
 
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I'm just having a hard time understanding the SS website when it comes to receiving benefits on my ex-spouses record.

If I currently get $1,000 per month, and my ex-spouse gets $2,000, what will I receive?
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Old 02-05-2017, 05:56 PM
 
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Take 1/2 your ex's full benefit even if they filed early . Then take what your full benefit is even if you filed early and subtract it from theirs. That difference if any gets added to your benefit you are getting
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Old 02-05-2017, 06:01 PM
 
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So....zip then.
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Saint Johns, FL
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Well, OP did not provide enough info. If ex-spouse filed at 62 and she gets $2,000 a month, then he probably will get an extra $2,000 a year (roughly).

He needs to talk to SS.
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Old 02-06-2017, 04:08 AM
 
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it is easy to figure out , we just need your full benefit amount and his , not what you may be getting because those amounts could be early benefits not full retirement age benefits .

it is all based on what the fra benefits would have been even if you filed early .

so lets say you filed early at 62 , you get 1k but if you waited until fra you would have gotten 1300.00 .

you take your spouses full retirement benefit , regardless if they filed early , lets say it is 2500.00 . take half that which is 1250.00 ,subtract 1300.00 and in this case you get nothing added to yours since your full is more than 1/2 his full .

lets say same scenario but your spouses full is 2800.00 you take 1/2 the 2800 which is 1400 and subtract your full which is 1300 and in this case you get an extra 100 added to your benefit that you are collecting .


if the 1k is your fra amount and the 2k is his fra amount than 1/2 of 2k is 1k . if we subtract 1k from his 1k you get zero added
you always get the difference ,if any , between `1/2 the spouses full and your full added to your own benefit .

so the answer all depends whether the 1 and 2k are fra amounts or reduced amounts because someone filed under fra .
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Old 02-06-2017, 04:22 AM
 
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And, remember, you have to have been married to the ex-spouse for a full 10 years to get benefits on his record if he is still alive. I think you also have to be currently unmarried, too.

It is different if he died while you were married.
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Old 02-06-2017, 04:25 AM
 
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yes , survivor benefits for ex spouses and spouses are very different from retirement benefits . in this case unless op say's other wise we are assuming we are talking retirement benefits not survivor .

survivor benefits are more complex because there are 2 moving targets and you get the higher of :

what the spouse who died got or a system of multipliers that act as a floor if both your spouse filed early for retirement benefits and you are filing early for survivor benefits .

so as an example you get what your spouse was getting as a survivor benefit if you take survivor benefits at YOUR fra . if you take it earlier than your fra they are reduced .

at age 60 as an example you get the spouses full rate regardless if they filed early x.61% . that acts as a floor so if your spouse filed early and you filed at 60 typically you would lose up to 48% of the spouses full . so to prevent to steep a cut survivor benefits have an alternate amount which uses multipliers based on how much under fra the surviving spouse files

Last edited by mathjak107; 02-06-2017 at 04:34 AM..
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
it is easy to figure out , we just need your full benefit amount and his , not what you may be getting because those amounts could be early benefits not full retirement age benefits .

it is all based on what the fra benefits would have been even if you filed early .

so lets say you filed early at 62 , you get 1k but if you waited until fra you would have gotten 1300.00 .

you take your spouses full retirement benefit , regardless if they filed early , lets say it is 2500.00 . take half that which is 1250.00 ,subtract 1300.00 and in this case you get nothing added to yours since your full is more than 1/2 his full .

lets say same scenario but your spouses full is 2800.00 you take 1/2 the 2800 which is 1400 and subtract your full which is 1300 and in this case you get an extra 100 added to your benefit that you are collecting .


if the 1k is your fra amount and the 2k is his fra amount than 1/2 of 2k is 1k . if we subtract 1k from his 1k you get zero added
you always get the difference ,if any , between `1/2 the spouses full and your full added to your own benefit .

so the answer all depends whether the 1 and 2k are fra amounts or reduced amounts because someone filed under fra .
Thank you for the good, clear explanation. My question is about when this can take place. My wife filed at age 62, taking the reduced amount. I am planning on waiting 4 years and taking mine at 66. Does she wait until I file to get the extra dollars added to her benefit?
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:25 AM
 
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yes , she gets nothing until you file .

if both of you were at least 62 in 2015 you have one more option .

my wife filed early at 62. i am delaying as long as i can and i am two years younger than my wife .

well my wife just hit her fra and suspended her early ss. she is now letting it grow by 8% a year . when she is 70 i will be 66-1/2. i can file not file and suspend because we lost that option , i can file restricted application and take 1/2 her benefit when she files again . at 70 i file for mine and then she gets a 4500.00 adder to hers as a spousal adder.

that maximized the dollars we can get .
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:35 AM
 
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^^^Yea, we both missed that. Both turned 62 in 2016. Thank you for the response!
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