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Old 02-07-2017, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I have wanted to try yoga, just gotta talk my BF into it.
Please just go alone if he won't go with you. My experience is that women outnumber men in yoga classes anyway.
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Old 02-08-2017, 12:29 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,579 posts, read 3,670,806 times
Reputation: 12382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post

Don't be like me. Don't let yourself go in the first place! Almost nothing in life is more important than this. We can acquiesce in being crippled or we can do something about it. (Like my knee, for example). I am diabetic, so this is even more important in my personal case.
Excellent post. My mental state after a couple health set-backs convinced me that I couldn't do things that I could before. I'm already pretty sedentary and it was easy to slip further down the slope. I was wrong -- it is harder but a little effort pays off --but it is still a slow comeback.
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Old 02-08-2017, 01:12 AM
 
6,353 posts, read 5,163,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
The first day at the gym I walked on the treadmill for 10 minutes at 4.7 mph to warm up, then set it for a slow run (5.8 mph). I only lasted two and a half minutes! Pathetic beyond words to describe it!
If you think that 4.7 mph is a walk and that 5.8 mph is a "slow" run, you have a fitness level higher than 99% of 72-year-olds and probably 50% of 25-year-olds. Are you sure of your numbers?
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Old 02-08-2017, 02:43 AM
 
71,635 posts, read 71,777,271 times
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i am in excellent shape and run 5 miles every other day . my average quick walk is 4.2-4.50 mph , i run 6.60 mph with bursts to 7.7 mph all while non stopping .

i have been doing this for 3 years now .but have been doing cardio for 15 years but at a lower level since i was not running .

until i started running and really getting my heart rate up i still needed my pressure medication and lipitor .

once i got to running and going up a level all the medications went away including for my diabetes .
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Old 02-08-2017, 04:16 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
If you think that 4.7 mph is a walk and that 5.8 mph is a "slow" run, you have a fitness level higher than 99% of 72-year-olds and probably 50% of 25-year-olds. Are you sure of your numbers?
I am absolutely sure of my numbers, which derive from many treadmills even at different gyms.

First, the point at which a walk becomes a jog depends partly on one's height (leg length). The longer the stride, the easier it is to walk at a given speed, as opposed to breaking into a jog to maintain that speed. I am somewhat taller than average and 4.7 is a very brisk walk for me. I do have to push myself somewhat to walk that fast.

You are exaggerating about the percentage of people who can do X speeds at certain ages, though I admit I nave no statistics on it. Keep in mind that 6.0 mph is exactly a ten-minute mile. That is pretty damn slow. Fairly small children such as sixth graders (ages 11 and 12) can normally do a mile faster than that. That doesn't mean all sixth graders, because after all some of them are completely sedentary nowdays except what they are forced to do at school, and some of them are overweight. When I was a kid in the 1950's almost all us were physically active; we rode our bikes, ran around the neighborhood, played badmiton, etc.

As for 25-year-olds, sadly, some of them have been sedentary throughout their childhoods, their high school years, their college years (whether they attended college or not), and on into their young adulthood. This is not normal in terms of our evolutionary biology and it is extremely unhealthy. So comparing myself to that totally unfit group (whatever percentage of 25-year-olds it represents) is totally meaningless.

Try googling something like "U.S. masters track records for the mile". I did that a few years ago and found the results mind-boggling. Not that us normal folks should expect to be anywhere close to those competetive athletes, but still, I can barely run twice as slow as the winners in my age group.
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Old 02-08-2017, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i am in excellent shape and run 5 miles every other day . my average quick walk is 4.2-4.50 mph , i run 6.60 mph with bursts to 7.7 mph all while non stopping .

i have been doing this for 3 years now .but have been doing cardio for 15 years but at a lower level since i was not running .

until i started running and really getting my heart rate up i still needed my pressure medication and lipitor .

once i got to running and going up a level all the medications went away including for my diabetes .
At one point in my early 60's I, too, got completely off diabetes meds through regular exercise at fairly high intensity, although I acheived the intensity by walking fast up an incline for a full hour. Then eventually I got lazy and had to go back on the meds.

You are exemplary, Mathjak!
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Old 02-08-2017, 05:00 AM
 
71,635 posts, read 71,777,271 times
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i hate it so much already . the days i don't run i weight lift . it just never ends . i feel like that hamster on the wheel .
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Old 02-08-2017, 06:03 AM
 
676 posts, read 334,275 times
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I am 56 and play squash 4 - 5 times a week. I've been playing off and on for decades (that and tennis). Squash is supposed to be the healthiest sport out there because it mimics HIIT and requires agility and mental acuity.

I was also lifting weights for many years, but have stopped temporarily in order to lose 10 lbs. Once I turned 50 I suddenly realized that if I didn't get very dedicated to my health and fitness, then I was going to be a decrepit old woman.

So now its a constant battle to keep the weight down and the body fit and toned. I'd rather do that than sit on my butt and eat my way into a doddering old age.

"Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light."
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Old 02-08-2017, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,587 posts, read 17,582,380 times
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I too think the 4.7 mph "walk" is fast. I am short and have to really hustle to truly walk at 4 mph. 5 mph for me is a light jog. Personally, even when I was slimmer, I never had any interest in running - I've always much preferred to walk at an incline, elliptical, simply take long walks, or hike on the weekends.

The thing about comparing ourselves to record holders of our peer group is that virtually anyone who can produce an athletic world record at any age has a physical gift most of us will never have. I bench pressed 335 lbs at around 175 lbs body weight between my senior year of high school and freshman year or college. Nearly doubling your body weight in a bench press is pretty strong, but it's nowhere near a world record in that weight/age group. No matter how hard I would have tried or how much juice I'd taken, I'm not going to be a world record bench presser. We can always improve our performance vs. where we previously were, and someone dedicated can likely compete on a local or even regional level - however, it takes a little more to get over the hump and be a world record caliber athlete, Olympian, etc.

I don't know any truly fit seniors in my immediate circle. A buddy of mine just turned 61 and was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes - he's not been sedentary (does not work a day job) but certainly no fitness enthusiast, and he smokes as well. He's cut out sweet tea (going to unsweet with splenda), all cola, all sugary sweets, and avoids high glycemic foods. He's lost about 30 lbs in three months and is down to 198 at 6'2. He's said he feels much better.

The problem with a lot of folks, like myself, is that they have a sedentary job where they are anchored to a desk/chair for eight or more hours a day. I had no problem keeping my weight down in college, as I was moving all the time, from class to class, to the gym, even walking back and forth to the car was a quarter to half a mile. I've never had an active job, and weight has piled on over the years. I had four consecutive days off last week, and lost five pounds from the first of the month to yesterday, and got my 10,000 steps each of those, and 14,000 along with five miles of hiking Saturday.
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Old 02-08-2017, 07:06 AM
 
86 posts, read 56,796 times
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I certainly can relate to this. I am 59 years old and my weight has piled on over the years due to being "too tired" to work out after a sedentary job. My DH and I have recently been astonished during a visit to see his older brother, who is only 68 but never much into fitness, or anything at all, has grown into an elderly man at his fairly young age. He not only looks about 10 years older, but ACTS about 10 years older than his age. This was a wake up call for both of us.


I went back to the gym with my DH only 2 weeks ago and already have lost some weight, but more importantly, I feel much better, more energy, stamina. When I retire in 2 1/2 months I plan to make this a daily routine as it is so true, use it or lose it. Also neither of us wants to turn into my brother in law who is a wonderful person but shocked us by his elderly appearance and demeanor. Thanks for the heads up Escort Rider!
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