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Old 02-08-2017, 09:29 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,650 posts, read 8,565,244 times
Reputation: 19863

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i hate it so much already . the days i don't run i weight lift . it just never ends . i feel like that hamster on the wheel .
Embrace the suck, Math.
You gotta embrace the suck.

I've been walking and stretching and lifting for many years.
71. No medications.

My wife was unlucky. She had a knee replaced. Then the other. Then knee #2 went bad, and had to be redone. Then it was redone a second time. So that's 4 knee replacements in about 12 years.
Then her shoulder went. Replaced (I didn't even know they did such things).

Good news:
After she finished rehab the rehabilitation center recommend a rebound program, which retaught her how to lift weights, run and do all the things she has not been able to do for a long time. Self pay, but not all that expensive.
She absolutely loves it, all her new pieces and parts are finally settled in with no pain and she is back where a fairly fit 71 year old would be.
A new lease on life!
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Old 02-08-2017, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Seattle
1,743 posts, read 3,199,084 times
Reputation: 4057
I run on the treadmill for 20-30 minutes at 5-6mph 2 to 3 times per week. I see news that indicates you need to exercise at least 5 days per week for 45 minutes. Iím not going there. Iíve found a balance between some enjoyment in exercising without going to extremes. 5 days per week would become too much work and Iíd quit going.

If I want to be reward with a feel good moment, I just look around and see Iím the only 60+ year old running at the gym. Although there are many on this thread who work out later in life, we're in the minority.
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Old 02-08-2017, 11:39 AM
 
71,512 posts, read 71,694,121 times
Reputation: 49088
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Embrace the suck, Math.
You gotta embrace the suck.

I've been walking and stretching and lifting for many years.
71. No medications.

My wife was unlucky. She had a knee replaced. Then the other. Then knee #2 went bad, and had to be redone. Then it was redone a second time. So that's 4 knee replacements in about 12 years.
Then her shoulder went. Replaced (I didn't even know they did such things).

Good news:
After she finished rehab the rehabilitation center recommend a rebound program, which retaught her how to lift weights, run and do all the things she has not been able to do for a long time. Self pay, but not all that expensive.
She absolutely loves it, all her new pieces and parts are finally settled in with no pain and she is back where a fairly fit 71 year old would be.
A new lease on life!

this has been my life for 15 years , i know . the gym is a way of life for us . we take 1 day off a week from the gym .
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Old 02-08-2017, 12:05 PM
 
25,976 posts, read 32,984,687 times
Reputation: 32158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Please just go alone if he won't go with you. My experience is that women outnumber men in yoga classes anyway.
No time to do that. We only see each other on weekends, and I don't have any time for it during the week. He's a bit clingy so weekend activities are always joint ones.
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Old 02-08-2017, 12:08 PM
 
71,512 posts, read 71,694,121 times
Reputation: 49088
my buddy is a ceo of a large oil company .

he didn't have 2 minutes in his schedule usually .

well he had a heart attack and the doctor ordered him to go to a gym daily .

well guess what / first priority of every day is the gym . something else now gets bumped off the schedule .
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Old 02-08-2017, 01:54 PM
 
5,426 posts, read 3,446,805 times
Reputation: 13698
Lessons on Aging Well, From a 105-Year-Old Cyclist By Gretchen Reynolds Feb 8, 2017 New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/08/w...-stories-below
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Old 02-08-2017, 03:07 PM
 
6,128 posts, read 2,541,264 times
Reputation: 2243
It's a slow process to get it back at any age if we stay inactive for a lengthy period of time. Even at 22 I'm feeling stiff after returning to the weights and cardio after a 3 year hiatus, which I'm now seriously regretting.
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Old 02-08-2017, 04:27 PM
 
197 posts, read 160,873 times
Reputation: 1122
i totally agree that , health permitting, you can regain lost fitness with the caveat that the more you let it slide the slower progress will be. I have exercised for many decades now.

For me, going to the gym is an effort of will but I shall do it as long as I am able. It is too easy to find excuses/ reasons to stop: poor health is an obvious reason.

I believe that I go to the gym to benefit my health but to stay my preferred size I need to exercise portion control. Going to the gym is no effort at all compared to that constant awareness which has become a way of life but still takes self control on my part.

If I ate and drank according to my appetite I should need a new wardrobe!
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Old 02-08-2017, 04:38 PM
 
71,512 posts, read 71,694,121 times
Reputation: 49088
i find that peak cardio ability comes and goes very quickly . if i don't run for a week it takes a week to work my way back to the same level of heart rate .
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Old 02-08-2017, 06:10 PM
 
Location: MidMichigan
45 posts, read 28,173 times
Reputation: 146
Default Please, please, please schedule a cardiac stress test

Quote:
Originally Posted by volosong View Post
But, something snapped inside me that day. In all my life, I never had to make the "Call of Shame" before. Since that day, my mileage has fallen drastically and I can really feel the loss of fitness. Used to be able to walk up from my lab on the second floor to the management offices on the fifth floor just fine. Now? I can hardly do it without being out of breath.

Last fall, I had an emergency triple bypass. And, like many people do following a major health incident, I have developed both 20-20 hindsight and become an outspoken advocate for cardiac care and intervention - treatment and recovery is so much easier when the heart is healthy, versus following a heart attack.

Your description is very familiar .. I used to bike ride 30-40 miles at a time, then it just faded away. I chalked it up to "not being twenty anymore" and "being out of shape". Ahhh, hindsight.

Last September, I went in for a cardiac stress test following the recommendation of my brother's cardiologist, who had suggested to my brother that his siblings be tested to see if we had the same or similar cardiac issues as my brother had. Yeah, yeah, sure, I'll do that, uh-huh .. and that's as far as it got.

I'd blown my brother off for over six months - I was busy, I felt fine, I'm very conscious about what I eat, don't smoke, rarely drink, and I'd never had a single chest pain or what I would consider classic "shortness of breath".

But my brother kept nagging, so I finally scheduled a stress test. Results: abnormalities. So, on to the next step - cardiac catheterization. Which meant another appointment, for crying out loud! (See: "I'm BUSY!")

So, I made my brother drive me to the catheterization appointment. Hey - this was all his fault - the least he could do is drive me and keep me company! That actually turned out to be a very good thing.

After the cath was done, I was wheeled back into the curtained "room" where my brother waited, and the cardiologist came in and said, "I'm sorry, but you're not going home this afternoon. You have three arteries with 95% or better blockage. I've scheduled you for bypass surgery first thing in the morning."

Flabbergasted does not even begin to describe my reaction.

Long story short (sorry - Irish heritage - long, involved stories are all I know, and I'm trying very hard to keep this to the Reader's Digest condensed version) - both surgery and recovery went well, and I've been told over and over that my recovery has gone so well because the surgery was done on a healthy heart versus one that has been damaged by a heart attack. I do know I feel great (although I didn't think I felt awful before surgery) and I'm happily pushing my physical limits, each day a little further than the day before.

But looking back, I can see two glaring symptoms that I couldn't pinpoint a cause at the time: cardiac fatigue such as you describe above, and in the last year before this little adventure, my eyes were bloodshot all the time - from the time I got up in the morning until I went to bed at night. I chalked up the fatigue to the natural progression of aging (I'm 57, btw - hardly "aging", but what did I know?) and I attributed the bloodshot eyes to overwearing my contact lenses.

Wrong, and wrong again. My eyes haven't been bloodshot since my surgery. And the fatigue is just a memory.

Have a stress test done. And a catheterization, if circumstances warrant. Worse case scenario, you'll have a complete baseline picture of your heart's health.
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