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Old 02-09-2017, 04:24 AM
 
132 posts, read 73,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The thing about a "BOOM! Heart attack!" is that you might not even be able to prevent it, or have warning signs. I had a 55 year old uncle who dropped dead of one back in 2010 - no known symptoms. My two grandfathers had numerous heart attacks and both lived at least normal lifespans.
you definitely can delay heart attacks by many decades, simply by avoiding saturated fats, especially from animal sources. Plants sources of saturated fats like palm and coconut oil are also bad.

i suggest reading the book" how not to die" by Dr. Micheal Gregor, an MD who reads almost every publication of the nutrition journals every year. He also has a youtube channel and website of the name "nutritionfacts.org"
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Old 02-09-2017, 04:33 AM
 
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what i found amazing is i ate terribly for much of my life . lots of sweets , junk food , high fat food . i have a genetic dis order they found where i run insanely high triglceride levels (over 1,000) and 400 plus cholestrohl levels if i am not careful what i eat and don't work out .

a had an echo cardiogram and carotid artery scan and things were amazingly clear . my mom died at 55 from heart disease .

my unprofessional opinion is there is a whole lot more going on then cholesterol tests and triglyceride tests lead us to believe . i think it is neither of those two things but something we do not kinow how to measure yet that is the culprit .

you have folks eating all kinds of high saturated fat diets all over the world and they live longer than we do .
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Old 02-09-2017, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Close to an earthquake
890 posts, read 678,635 times
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Eat and exercise as little as possible to be as fit, functional and strong as you need to be living the life you've chosen. Anything beyond this "as little as possible" prescription provides recreational and social benefits more than extended life expectancy benefits.

The research on calorie restriction (CR) and intermittent fasting (IF) protocols of eating for good health are pretty convincing. I've practiced IF several times over the past 7 years, and am currently doing it again, this time with a 5-hour eating window in a 24-hour day. It takes about one to two weeks to reprogram the brain and clock-driven habit eating that most of us practice.

"Oh, it's 12:00 noon, time to eat lunch." Maybe you're not hungry.

Based on my own experiences over more than 25 years of playing this fitness, health and wellness game, I honestly believe it doesn't matter what you eat so long as you just eat less.

If you practice IF to eat less, it's all about picking a smart feeding window that takes into account your work and other activities. Sometimes it's hard to do unless you're a one-man band because you've got to be mindful of what's the best time to eat as a family.

And if you're eating less, you have to be mindful of exercise volume because of the appetite it creates. The calories you burn from running hard on the treadmill for 30 minutes can be eaten in about two minutes. I have a saying: "The cardio pony will make a stallion appetite."

I've exercised "beastly" in the past with unbelievable training volume and some relatively-speaking performance progressions in my fitness training avenues. While it felt good to be super-fit, run faster, lift more and be more agile and swift, honestly these accomplishments probably didn't do much adding to my potential life expectancy from what I'm doing now which is about one hour of exercise a week, three times a week for 20 minutes with high intensity.

But it did fuel a gigantic appetite and calorie consumption that I could "finance" because of the calories being burned from all the exercising I was doing.

But at some point, we fitness beasts decide that we've had enough and taper down the exercise intensity and volume we're willing to do. We make a "business decision" to take a different approach that may have minimalist leanings.

When that day arrives, unfortunately, the appetite doesn't automatically tailor downwards to follow these new fitness lifestyle choices because our mind and pleasure system have grown comfortable with eating big.

There starts the problem for many.

So for all those who are embarking on doing something different in a pursuit of improving their fitness, health and wellness, read my lips: "Eat and exercise as little as possible to be as fit, functional and strong as you need to be living the life you've chosen."
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Old 02-09-2017, 07:33 AM
 
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the days i run i don't even get full . my arm just gets tired lifting a fork .
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Old 02-09-2017, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,754,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DNAborg View Post
i'm 24 so correct me i am wrong, but isn't muscle atrophy the biggest concern for seniors in terms of fitness? If so, less effort should be put on running (hard on the knees) and more on resistance training ( squats are the best for any age, but esp for the seniors, since it trains multiple muscles). Start lighter, and have a spotter, for safety

I highly suggest the book titled "Body by Science" by Doug Mcguff, an MD. I would skip the section on nutrition, though, which is not his bread and butter. Mcguff offers very dangerous diet advice (low carb). For nutrition, i suggest the book "How not to Die" by Michael Greggor, another MD who specializes in nutrition.
You make a good point about the importance of resistance (weight) training for seniors. And I am guilty of de-emphasizing that in my original post, even though I know better. I decided to begin my comeback with mostly cardio which is, in my opinion, equally important. Once the jog-a-thon on Feb. 24 is behind me, I will start back with weights, while continuing the cardio.
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Old 02-09-2017, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Miraflores
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Originally Posted by Luvvarkansas View Post
My 78 yo mom swears by yoga.
My 99 y/o Father swears at his walker!
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Old 02-09-2017, 12:28 PM
 
Location: equator
3,462 posts, read 1,543,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Here's the hard fact about this. At a certain age, which may vary among people, your body is just looking for a chance to retire and turn-down its functions. It isn't just a slow, passive process, but an active one. Your strength and abilities will quickly be taken from you, if you don't keep active. You have to continually prove to your genetic blueprint, that you really are engaged in an active and productive life, to earn its re-certification. It's to the benefit of the overall population, if you just fade away, if you stop being active.

The more closely your activities resemble those of a younger and athletic person, the longer your body will maintain its functions for you. The best formula, is to start training hard as a young child and never let up, also eating only healthy foods and avoiding harmful substances. Do people remember Jack LaLanne? He towed a boat with two dozen people in it, with a rope held in his teeth, handcuffed, swimming across San Francisco Bay, when he was 80. Do you think there was ever a day in his life, when he just laid-back and took it easy?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_LaLanne

People like him are an anomaly of good genetics which, to his credit, he then capitalized on with hard work and good marketing.
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Old 02-09-2017, 12:36 PM
 
Location: equator
3,462 posts, read 1,543,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
being fit does not always lead to better health , but being unfit and obese can take away from it . many times things are measured in what we are not losing vs what we are gaining.

in fact my weight lifting is like that . while my arms are still pretty big , i no longer am getting bigger , but i am not shrinking much either .so the weightlifting is sustaining me while others my age lose muscle like crazy . things just are not measured in gains now , but measured in what we are not losing ..

my wife gets frustrated all the time because her gains in muscle have stopped , and i have to remind her all the time to look at herself at 66 and to look at others and things are measured now in what you are not losing , not gaining

that is me in the orange recently , not as big as i once was but just kind of sustaining and reducing the shrinkage . sounds like a seinfeld episode ha ha ha

Wow, impressive, math! Not at all how I had you pictured. From this distance you could be in your 40's. (do you color your hair? ) Great muscles. You are to be commended for (among other things) controlling your diabetes by diet and exercise. No easy matter. Sounds like your wife is right up there with you. Not sure us women want to see her pic, then feel inferior.
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Old 02-09-2017, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,261 posts, read 44,955,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I too think the 4.7 mph "walk" is fast. I am short and have to really hustle to truly walk at 4 mph. 5 mph for me is a light jog. Personally, even when I was slimmer, I never had any interest in running - I've always much preferred to walk at an incline, elliptical, simply take long walks, or hike on the weekends.

The thing about comparing ourselves to record holders of our peer group is that virtually anyone who can produce an athletic world record at any age has a physical gift most of us will never have. I bench pressed 335 lbs at around 175 lbs body weight between my senior year of high school and freshman year or college. Nearly doubling your body weight in a bench press is pretty strong, but it's nowhere near a world record in that weight/age group. No matter how hard I would have tried or how much juice I'd taken, I'm not going to be a world record bench presser. We can always improve our performance vs. where we previously were, and someone dedicated can likely compete on a local or even regional level - however, it takes a little more to get over the hump and be a world record caliber athlete, Olympian, etc.

I don't know any truly fit seniors in my immediate circle. A buddy of mine just turned 61 and was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes - he's not been sedentary (does not work a day job) but certainly no fitness enthusiast, and he smokes as well. He's cut out sweet tea (going to unsweet with splenda), all cola, all sugary sweets, and avoids high glycemic foods. He's lost about 30 lbs in three months and is down to 198 at 6'2. He's said he feels much better.

The problem with a lot of folks, like myself, is that they have a sedentary job where they are anchored to a desk/chair for eight or more hours a day. I had no problem keeping my weight down in college, as I was moving all the time, from class to class, to the gym, even walking back and forth to the car was a quarter to half a mile. I've never had an active job, and weight has piled on over the years. I had four consecutive days off last week, and lost five pounds from the first of the month to yesterday, and got my 10,000 steps each of those, and 14,000 along with five miles of hiking Saturday.
Something to keep in mind is that smaller people are inherently better at body weight feats like # of pull-ups, or benching 2X body weight - short simple explanation is to consider a 100# guy, 5' tall, sort of slim guy. OK, consider a guy exactly the same build but 10' tall. (I realize there are no 10' tall people but that makes the maths easier) - so while his strength is going to go with about the square of his size, i.e. muscle cross-sectional area, so he's about 4X as strong as the small guy. But his weight goes with the cube of size, so he weighs 800#!

ER, you are dead on right, any weight gained or strength/endurance lost is harder to correct as one ages. Like keeping a good car or bike, the way to "fix" it is to not break it in the first place!
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Old 02-09-2017, 01:30 PM
 
71,740 posts, read 71,853,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Wow, impressive, math! Not at all how I had you pictured. From this distance you could be in your 40's. (do you color your hair? ) Great muscles. You are to be commended for (among other things) controlling your diabetes by diet and exercise. No easy matter. Sounds like your wife is right up there with you. Not sure us women want to see her pic, then feel inferior.
i have good aging genes i guess . my dad was the opposite he was bald very young . yeah my wife keeps in shape too . she is a gym rat too the last 15 years
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