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Old 02-11-2017, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,162 posts, read 650,159 times
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We had non-descript grey linoleum on the floor, a magic chef stove with a storage space on the bottom right and pilot lights but we had to light the oven with a match. It wasn't insulated and made the tiny kitchen hot as blazes. Refrigerator had a very small aluminum freezer hanging from the top inside about the size of a lunch box. We had 2 small upper cabinets made of wood with all the finish worn off, 2 bottom cabinets and the space under the sink. Dad made a cabinet for over the tiny table out of painted plywood and we put a metal skinny tall cabinet in the corner for things like cereal boxes, etc.

Countertop was grey formica with those chrome strips around. With a door to the outside and another door to the cellar our table was so small we had to pull it out a bit and put up the leaf and 4 of us squeezed around it. We couldn't open the refrigerator when we used the table because Dad's chair was up against the ref. door.

Heaven forbid we would use the dining room which was roomier - that was strictly for company.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,660 posts, read 1,525,919 times
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Most of my kitchen is from 1961 - painted white cabinets with a periwinkle blue tile countertop with thick wine colored trim tile. A rounded peninsula end cabinet with shelves for decorative items. A 36" wide electric stove that has a second oven for bread loaf pans. I added a Sellers cabinet (similar to Hoosier pictured above) to complete the look. Unfortunately the cabinets are not high quality and the kitchen is starting to look worn.

My early childhood homes usually had the metal kitchen cabinets. My great grandmother's house had an old icebox and wringer washer discarded in the backyard that she had brought from her previous home in the country.
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,509,293 times
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I remember the avocado green appliances in our eat-in kitchen in the 70s. We had a dining room, but that was just for company or holidays. Mom had a ''hutch'' in there where the china and silverware set were kept. I never remember ever eating off those.
Mom and grandma kept a container on the back of the stove for bacon grease and the most used pan was the black iron skillet. Eggs and bacon were a stable in our house and I still always turn to that if I can't think of anything I'd like to eat at the moment.
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:53 PM
 
2,074 posts, read 1,153,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
I have a classic table from the 1950's, aluminum legs and a red boomerang formica on the top.

I much prefer my quartz counter tops. They are indestructible!
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Old 02-11-2017, 11:00 PM
 
2,074 posts, read 1,153,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
Most of my kitchen is from 1961 - painted white cabinets with a periwinkle blue tile countertop with thick wine colored trim tile. A rounded peninsula end cabinet with shelves for decorative items. A 36" wide electric stove that has a second oven for bread loaf pans. I added a Sellers cabinet (similar to Hoosier pictured above) to complete the look. Unfortunately the cabinets are not high quality and the kitchen is starting to look worn.

My early childhood homes usually had the metal kitchen cabinets. My great grandmother's house had an old icebox and wringer washer discarded in the backyard that she had brought from her previous home in the country.
I am amazed your kitchen has lasted over 50 years!
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Old 02-11-2017, 11:04 PM
 
6,314 posts, read 3,578,007 times
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Once, about forty years ago, I was driving in the country on my way home from visiting my parents. I drove by the farm of an old bachelor farmer and there he was in all his grizzly bachelor glory canning tomatoes in the summer heat in the shade of the grove. Must have taken him a couple of days just to get everything all set up.


Made me think of a tour I once took through Villa Louis in Prairie du Chien, WI. It was the mid-eighteen-hundreds home of a French lumberman, fur trader and land speculator. The thing I remembered most about it was the fact that they had a summer kitchen built in a shady glen some distance from the house to keep the home cooler during the summer months. You have to keep in mind that those wood-burning stoves, once lit, were not something of which you could easily control the temperature.


Though not as spectacular as a Midwestern lumber baron's home, I had to think our bachelor friend had his own version of a summer kitchen.
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Old 02-11-2017, 11:09 PM
 
2,074 posts, read 1,153,210 times
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Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
Same deal here. I have a 1953 gas Wedgwood stove/oven with constant pilot lights (great for "raising" bread and rolls), an enamel-topped table with pop-up wings, a Hoosier cabinet with a matching pantry cabinet, and a 1940's glass-front utility cabinet. Oh and a red Cosco pull-out step stool so I can reach the uppr cabinets. I did have a 1926 electric waffle iron, but I gave it to someone; however, I do have my old, heavy stand mixer with its' original bowls. And I use my Mom's Stieff Rose sterling silver wedding set every day - I even have her original order form from the Baltimore silversmiths.
My husband's uncle worked for Stieff silver in Baltimore from early in the last century. He was a real "teamster", driving a team of horses pulling a truck of silver. He drove a Stieff truck for 50 years. The uncle never had children and he had so much silver. He had several sets of Stieff Rose which he gave to us along with another pattern, I think it's called Corsage. We too use silver everyday. I really enjoy it. We use it with Fiestaware which I love. Everything else about my house is brand spanking new so I enjoy the dishes and silver.
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Old 02-11-2017, 11:25 PM
 
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All of those kitchens look a lot nicer and bigger than the ones my family had throughout the years. I live in an area where many homes and apartments are still original. Anything post War doesn't seem old looking to me. There are still stoves with pilot lights and refrigerators that have to be defrosted. Plenty (including mine) have formica and there are even kitchens around with linoleum floors. Same with the bathrooms.
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Old 02-12-2017, 10:53 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,068 posts, read 9,531,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iggier View Post
But those are all "city" kitchens.

I remember (barely) the kitchen in my aunt and uncle's farmhouse. There was a pump in the sink instead of any sort of faucet. And no indoor plumbing other than that. This would have been early 50's.
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Old 02-12-2017, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,618 posts, read 9,684,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
In the Forties our kitchens looked like those of the 1920s. Then in the Fifties our kitchen was remodeled with formica countertop, wooden cabinets on the wall and a linoleum floor. And, of course, it was an eat-in kitchen as we were a low-end working class family, and you ate in the kitchen except when company came.

My aunt, my mother's oldest sister, who lived on a farm, had a wood-burning stove, a pump over the kitchen sink basin and old fashion cupboards in her kitchen until well into the Fifties. Bringing a pump into the kitchen had been a big advance and beat hauling water from the outside pump, especially in winter. But then my family's friends who lived down the street in our town in the late Forties had exactly the same set-up - except they had piped in water.

That sounds like my grandma's kitchen on the farm except we did have a well out in the yard. Bucket and all. Even after they moved into town, around 1952, she kept her woodstove. Eventually she got a gas stove but hated it. I remember her making lye soap in a 50 gallon drum out in the yard and doing laundry on an open fire as well. She thought she'd died and gone to heaven when she got a wringer washer!
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