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Old 02-12-2017, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,627 posts, read 9,698,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Mom and Dad married after the Second World War and started their married lives in a basement house. The idea was that eventually they would build on it.


IIRC the kitchen was little but a hallway. It was crowded even to an infant's eye and both my crib and wooden high chair were included there. I can't remember the stove or refrigerator (suppose those were off-limits) but I do remember the food.


We lived next to a dairy state and weren't allowed to buy colored margarine. Ours came in a plastic bag looking like a pound of lard with a little red dot of food coloring in the middle. The idea was to knead the bag until the food coloring was distributed.


And I remember the first time Mom brought home a package of frozen food - Birdseye frozen peas. They must have been expensive but quite a treat.


It was my paternal grandma's kitchen across the street that was spectacular with its ponderous cast iron coal-burning stove, walk-in pantry and breakfast nook. She took orders for baking from the local townspeople and on Saturday mornings the whole downstairs would be filled with rising dough and cooling goodies of all kinds.


Just browsing through her kitchen gadgets was enough to keep me entertained for hours. She had everything - springerle and sandbakkels forms, wooden potato masher, coffee grinder from Norway, pastry cutters of various designs, potato ricer, sausage maker, wonderful cut glass cake stands, a collection of salt and pepper shakers.


My maternal grandmother still had an old wooden icebox in my earliest recollections.


My in-laws lived on a farm and they had seven boys whom they fed around an antique oak table which took up most of the kitchen. DH says his mother was so happy to replace that priceless antique with a new formica table with leaves. The oak table was retired to the grove. By the time we had thought to rescue it there was little left but firewood.

I remember that margarine. It was my 'job' to knead it until it was all yellow! I was five years old. lol We also had a wooden icebox at that time and I remember the iceman delivering ice blocks a couple times a week.


I loved all her 'kitchen gadgets' too. My cousin has a lot of them now and has made a nice display of them in his kitchen. They are all still useable.
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Old 02-12-2017, 01:30 PM
 
823 posts, read 3,068,182 times
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Love this thread! Thanks for starting it.

Here is a blog that has lots of things on it that might trigger even more memories: https://tulsage.wordpress.com/2014/1...-you-remember/
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Old 02-12-2017, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,955 posts, read 14,428,907 times
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The earliest kitchen that I lived in was in an old rent house. The kitchen seemed big to me, but I think it was probably pretty small. It has left more of an impression that a real memory.

We moved to a small three room duplex, and our first kitchen table, probably brought over from the rent house, was wood with turned legs and matching chairs. I believe my Dad painted the whole thing red. Later my parents bought a dinette set, with green formica top, in a sort of cross hatch pattern.

The kitchen had enamel covered metal cabinets, and the sink had a drainboard. I remember getting my hair washed there, and I also remember my youngest sister crying her eyes out when she had her hair washed the same way. My mom used an old fashioned pre war gas Magic Chef stove that required one to light the pilot light every time you needed to turn on the oven.

We had a Kelvinator fridge that kept going for decades, but it was small and dated in just a few years. It had the ice box right in the middle of the box, and it only held ice cube trays with a little room left over.

The working area of the kitchen would seem impossibly small by today's standards. But both houses still stand and people still live in them.
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Old 02-12-2017, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,956 posts, read 7,402,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Mom and Dad married after the Second World War and started their married lives in a basement house. The idea was that eventually they would build on it.

My grandparents lived in a basement house for many years until they finally built up and added the main level. My grandmother continued to use the stove for canning for many decades. The kitchen was quite big. The washing machine had those old rollers to wring out clothes - item by item went through the wringers, one at a time. My arm was caught in it once and rolled right up to my arm pit. I was lucky - no skin came off, I heard stories of other kids having the skin of their arms ripped off or their arms flattened.

We lived next to a dairy state and weren't allowed to buy colored margarine. Ours came in a plastic bag looking like a pound of lard with a little red dot of food coloring in the middle. The idea was to knead the bag until the food coloring was distributed.

This was my job - I was a little kid and sat forever kneading that red dot into the rest of the bag. I think she just wanted to keep me busy and out of her hair.
^^^^^

Last edited by Umbria; 02-12-2017 at 05:37 PM..
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Old 02-12-2017, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,119 posts, read 8,168,861 times
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I was born in 1947, and remember my grandmother's kitchen in the early 50s. She had everything from the Great Depression, but it all worked and lasted her into the 1970s. There were no cabinets. She had an old white gas stove on legs, with the oven beside it. She stored dishes and pots in a metal cabinet that was not built in. Yes, Iit was that shade of green.

The kitchen had 2 parts; one she called the pantry, and it had a big old white porcelain sink, a white fridge with rounded corners, and some sort of wood topped work surface. The larger room had a wooden table with 6 chairs around it, and none of them matched. The gas stove and metal cabinet were in there, too.

Some of my best memories in life took place in that kitchen. In the late 1940s, my grandfather gave my grandmother a set of gold-rimmed dishes with an antique print in the center. It was her first matching set of dishes ever, and she was about 60 when she got them. She used them for holidays only.

I still have that set of dishes, and we use them for holidays only!
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Old 02-12-2017, 05:51 PM
 
11,946 posts, read 20,417,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rational1 View Post
Boomerang formica

(it's back).
Got it, and I LOVE it. Mines a medium grey with pink, turquoise and light grey boomerangs
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Old 02-12-2017, 06:06 PM
 
990 posts, read 1,526,872 times
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My mom's kitchen, which I described in an earlier post, had been updated around 1950. Nor'Eastah's post reminded me of some of the kitchens some of our neighbors had.
These were semidetached circa 1910 homes. In the 60's, some of them still used the tiny original kitchens. Others did what the previous owners of my parent's house did, they turned the breakfast room into a "modern" kitchen.
To describe the original kitchens: well, they were just a bit larger than a 5'x8' bathroom. Actually, I know for a fact that they were 5' deep, because dad turned our back room into a bathroom, and the tub just fit. The kitchens had a small stove, a sink, room for a small refrigerator and a small worktable for food prep, and a little bit of cabinet space on the wall.
That reminds me. When our house was remodeled around 1950, the owners turned the 3rd floor into a small apartment for the in laws. They used the sink that used to be in their old kitchen. (Mom found out all this when she and dad bought the house.) Anyway, the sink was only about 3" deep. In my youth I found this rather puzzling. How the heck could you wash the dishes in a couple of inches of water? Later I realized you were supposed to fill a wash pan with the water and you only used the sink to pour the dirty water into.
There are more pics of old kitchens here, mixed in with other albums. You're welcome to check them out if you like. The album called 1940's kitchens has some pictures of a museum kitchen with that old yellow brick and ivy wallpaper my mom had.
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Old 02-12-2017, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Wayward Pines,ID
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Nostalgic thread. My youngest sister still lives in the house she was born in and all my family grew up in. Kitchen mainly unchanged. Here is the stove from 1920.

biddefordkitchen by elousv, on Flickr
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Old 02-12-2017, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Eastern Oregon
983 posts, read 763,231 times
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My mother didn't have a range hood. Growing up, I never thought anything about it, even though the kitchen windows steamed up when she was cooking something on the stove top. In hindsight, though, that is why the cupboards had a sticky film on them. When did range hoods/fans become standard?

Now I have my own kitchen that dh and I designed. I turn on my fan every time I do anything on the stove top, and I wonder how my mother stood it all those years, not having one.
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Old 02-12-2017, 09:11 PM
 
3,504 posts, read 7,953,233 times
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Early 60s - knotty pine cabinets, stainless steel wall oven - yes - we had stainless steel in 1963 - Formica countertops with a boomerang pattern and metal legs - icebox with the big silver handle that kinda locked - I remember standing on a step stool to wash the dishes as a kid
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