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Old 02-17-2017, 08:31 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,604 posts, read 39,974,527 times
Reputation: 23745

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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
This is such a great thread... I am certain we will be traveling a few years early on and with no house to hold us back or cost us to keep we are considering a storage pod or two. ... tools I have are important to me if we decide that after 2 or 3 years we want to settle back down will I want them. ...
yes.... I have my grandfather(s) tools and furniture they inherited from Pioneer homesteader family. and we travel a LOT!! (all of last yr), usually 50% of time.
Option that works for us:
1) Buy / build a shop on acreage with RV hookups and apartment. We rent out the main house (for $1000 / month positive cash flow) and we can stay in the shop or RV site (for free) any time we are in the region (we have a few of these places scattered around).
2) Buy a commercial building and rent most of it out, but keep a section for you. NNN rents are GREAT. (No taxes, insurance, repairs). 10% cap rate


Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Depends on how long you plan to store the tools and other items. When the cost of storage for x years will be more than the cost of replacing the items, you may as well sell them now and rebuy what you need later.

BE CAREFUL (as mentioned my storage solution PAYS me, and I get a 'write-off' on each trip if I actively maintain / manage properties)

The quality of tools today (excluding battery tools) are usually MUCH lighter / throw away that 20 - 50 yrs ago. If you have good quality stuff you have spent yrs collecting... you will NOT have time in life to replace it with similar quality and service. I have milling machines and Lathes from the 1920's + many electric and stationary tools from 1950's

If you have generic / modern stuff, sell and rebuy (it may be close to worn-out anyway.)
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Old 02-17-2017, 09:01 PM
 
21 posts, read 12,257 times
Reputation: 67
Remember that your Grandmother is an adult.
If she has her faculties, she can make her own decisions.
If those decisions result in an injury that shortens her life that's her choice. . . just as whether we exercise, eat well, smoke, drink, or otherwise manage our health is our decision as an adult.
It is her life. It is her choice.
You can be frank with her.
For example, "If we leave it until you're gone to take care of sorting through Grandpa's things you won't be here to tell us the history of his things. We won't know what is important."
Or, "If we wait until you're gone we may have a lot to do with getting the house ready to sell, we might have to hire a stranger to sort through Grandpa's things and decide what to sell and what to throw away."
Give her other perspectives, but let her choose.
You are not obligated to interrupt your life to accommodate your Grandma's choices. Do what you want. Help her as much as you want, but not more, because you'll resent her and that worsens your relationship with her and strong connections with others (good relationships) are very important for health.
Ask what sort of help the county provides. The county my parents lived in until recently provided transportation help, meal deliveries.
Enjoy your Grandma while you have her. You'll enjoy her more if you don't attempt to control her decisions.
Human nature is a funny thing. When you push someone to do something they're not ready to do their mind automatically comes up with reasons not to do what they don't yet want to do--cementing their position more firmly. Give her some credit for intelligence and let her come to the decisions in her own time. She may surprise you.
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Old 02-17-2017, 09:10 PM
 
5,429 posts, read 3,452,633 times
Reputation: 13714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
She has had knee issues for the past several years with increasing severity and went for an MRI last week. The follow up was not good - she has a stress fracture, the knee is "bone rubbing on bone," and there is severe arthritis and inflammation. The doctors gave her a cortisone shot, but do not think surgery would help with all the arthritis. It is wear and tear for someone of that age, but she is throwing a pity-party and acts like she's going to have her leg amputated.

Needless to say, the layout of this home is not doable for someone who has a hard time getting around. The walker/cane has to go up the stairs.

The mobility issues are getting worse, she is requiring more care over the last few weeks,
I don't understand the OP's attitude in saying "she is throwing a pity-party and acts like she's going to have her leg amputated". This is being hostile on your part, and lacking in empathy. Bone rubbing on bone with severe arthritis is very painful, and it hurts really badly when walking. So every step one takes can be close to agony or actual agony.

(a cortisone shot is temporary and often only a small bit helpful for a little while, and after a while cortisone shots do not help at all, and are useless to receive)

Last edited by matisse12; 02-17-2017 at 09:20 PM..
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Old 02-17-2017, 09:20 PM
 
21 posts, read 12,257 times
Reputation: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
!



This is the attitude I do not understand. I hope I never get this stubborn when I get older. Expecting relatives to clean out your house after you die is a huge imposition. Letting them clean it out while you are there is also an imposition, but they can at least do it on their own free time AND you can tell them what items have meaning to you or your family history. What's the point of keeping the dead husband's basement "collection" -- it won't bring him back.

And there is a difference between not wanting to downsize while you are still able to take care of it all yourself, and being told to downsize (and eliminate stairs, etc) when 3 people in your family are having their own lives disrupted week after week, month after month, doing all the things you can no longer do. Treating family like servants is not being independent.
No family members are required to give up any of their time to assist.
She may be stubborn because they visit her while she is there but if she didn't need any help because she had moved to a single floor home without a yard the visits might be less frequent and she is one of the 20% of Americans who are lonely.

Learning to say no is a skill. This family can use this opportunity to learn that skill.
I don't expect my parents to clean out their house while they are still living there. I want them to enjoy their possessions while they can.
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Old 02-17-2017, 09:30 PM
 
21 posts, read 12,257 times
Reputation: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
This is such a great thread as I am beginning the process of clearing and organizing the house. DW and I are planning on selling our overly large (for us house) in about 5 years. I am a well equipped do it yourselfer and I am wondering where to draw the line. I am certain we will be traveling a few years early on and with no house to hold us back or cost us to keep we are considering a storage pod or two. Then there is where to keep that stuff stored at when the world's our oyster. Things like the bed may or may not travel with us so that is probably not a long term storage. What tools I have are important to me if we decide that after 2 or 3 years we want to settle back down will I want them. What will stay with the house for certain are the two snow throwers. Even if I want to do yard maintenance I doubt that is going to include snow removal and if it does I will just buy a new one. What I wonder is whether or not to keep my construction tools (air compressors (2), nail guns, air ratchet and impact tools). Do I also keep my portable work benches? What about all my sockets and wrenches? Do I dump them or keep them? How does anyone come to terms and cope with that change?
If you're just storing (not transporting over distance where weight factors into cost) keep them. Dad is 83 and when he moved here 12 years ago he left many of his tools behind. There have been many times since then that he wished he had some of them. He still drives from NC to Colorado, NM, etc. to go bow hunting for elk in the autumn. There is not much he can't do, he's just a bit slower at it.
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Old 02-18-2017, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,850,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeaninejoy View Post
If you're just storing (not transporting over distance where weight factors into cost) keep them. Dad is 83 and when he moved here 12 years ago he left many of his tools behind. There have been many times since then that he wished he had some of them. He still drives from NC to Colorado, NM, etc. to go bow hunting for elk in the autumn. There is not much he can't do, he's just a bit slower at it.
I am thinking the same thing. Here is why. First I have no idea if after selling the house I won't decide that having an anchor isn't better for me. I like puttering around the house doing this and that. I have also made cabinetry which came out great and I had fun doing so. I have a floor jack and do tire rotations so I can see if there is any maintenance needed on the cars. I don't do oil changes because of disposal and how low many of the cars are these days. In this house I found that light placement wasn't enough during construction so I have added or moved lights. I have replaced and installed ceiling fans. I have added and replaced sinks and toilets. All of this has given me pain and joy.

My thoughts are if I put some stuff in shipping to a city we plan to use as a base like beds, chests, clothes, a functional tool box (I have a nice 150 piece set from Lowes), golf clubs it then makes a smaller storage space possible. Then I can put in all my collection of wood working tools, paint supplies, specialty tools for things I probably will not do while traveling. I might be able to rent space from on of my family or friends or rent a pod or storage space. If I spend and this is probably more than it will cost, $100 a month for storage and insurance it is very doable. I also think this space can be used to keep things like photographs and books. Collectable vases and knickknacks are also in that mix.

It is hard to draw the line but that is what line I think. It is just hard to dispose of all that collected booty.
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Old 02-21-2017, 10:56 PM
 
7 posts, read 2,626 times
Reputation: 38
Here's something to consider when thinking about downsizing and what to keep: Many cities have well stocked "Tool Libraries" where you can check out up to 10 tools for a week or more. The one in West Philly charges $20/year for a library card. They have every kind of tool imaginable including power tools, wood working tools and gardening tools. No need to sink a fortune into and devote space to hundreds of tools you use a few times a year. See if your area has one you can join or better yet-donate your tools and start one! Much more efficient use of resources. Bike coops are also good ways to have all the tools and space needed to fix bikes as well. Just food for thought.
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Old 02-22-2017, 04:21 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,850,322 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misquito View Post
Here's something to consider when thinking about downsizing and what to keep: Many cities have well stocked "Tool Libraries" where you can check out up to 10 tools for a week or more. The one in West Philly charges $20/year for a library card. They have every kind of tool imaginable including power tools, wood working tools and gardening tools. No need to sink a fortune into and devote space to hundreds of tools you use a few times a year. See if your area has one you can join or better yet-donate your tools and start one! Much more efficient use of resources. Bike coops are also good ways to have all the tools and space needed to fix bikes as well. Just food for thought.
Heaven forbid someone puts their hands on my Makita impact drill/driver. OMG the shame of it.


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Old 02-23-2017, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Full time in the RV
2,869 posts, read 6,408,999 times
Reputation: 2432
This thread may help:
What did you do to downsize today?
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Old 02-23-2017, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,587 posts, read 17,582,380 times
Reputation: 27677
Grandmother is staying with aunt indefinitely for now. Grandmother went home for a bit Sunday after church - I went over there and I think she may be starting to come terms, slowly, with the fact that she needs to downsize. She mentioned the house is becoming inconvenient and difficult for her to get around in. Other than going to the salon on Friday and church on Sunday, she's rarely driving at all now, and hasn't driven at night in years.

I don't think she has any desire to outright move in with aunt, but I could easily see this leg issue easing her in there. That neighborhood was mostly populated with people her age and older - almost all have died or are in very bad shape, and the long term younger neighbor and close family friend died suddenly in a traffic accident last year. Neighborhood has had probably 80% turnover in five years, and many lived there 40-50 years. Grandmother is also the last of her siblings left in this area out of twelve (one brother in California is still alive). I can see how she gets depressed.

After thinking about it more, I think the house will have some trouble selling. The master bedroom is barely larger than the other two bedrooms - all are small, and it's only, per Trulia, 1425 sq ft. including the basement. The master bathroom is absolutely tiny - a toilet, tiny pedestal sink, and a shower stall. Main restroom has dated linoleum, green wallpaper, etc. No restroom on the main level or in the basement - there is a den in the basement, but you'd have to go up to the main level then to the upstairs. They have a wrap around island in the kitchen, but never installed a dishwasher. There isn't anything wrong with the house, but the layout is just not what people want today and it's small. Zillow estimate for it is about $125,000, which is probably pretty accurate.

Grandmother is letting me use her trash for my extra garbage while she's gone, so I've got to take some garbage over there and get it to the road this evening after work. With as warm as it's been, we'll probably be mowing in a couple of weeks.
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