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Old 02-18-2017, 12:53 PM
 
7,802 posts, read 4,393,390 times
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What's making me doubt (but not really) my decision is the sudden and premature death of a coworker. It's true that tomorrow is promised to no one but, comparatively speaking, I'm in great health and don't anticipate my retirement being cut short by illness or disability. I agree that I need to set that deadline (next year) and stick to it no matter what, even if it means kicking my own butt out. The "one more year" thing can't happen. Nor the "I was bored, so I came back to work" thing (unless it's a new career).
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Old 02-18-2017, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,896 posts, read 14,390,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
...of a lot of very valid sounding reasons but really -- after all those years of anticipation -- you're either just not ready to act, still undecided about what to do with it, or frankly just afraid of change? Practically speaking, I have to live in my house another half year to avoid capital gains when I sell it, my pension will be considerably larger if I delay it another year, I'll be eligible to draw on my IRA then to avoid dipping into saving, etc., but I know that if I revealed to anyone that I'm actually eligible to retire -- TODAY -- I'd be chastized for not seizing the day, lectured about how short life can be, told that I'm wasting my time, etc... But the fact is, my job isn't intolerable, and I just haven't got my ducks in a row yet! It seems enough for now just to know that I can... Now it's time to stop just dreaming and actually start choosing and planning.
If your health is good, your predecessors lived to great old ages, and you feel good about working, I think you could delay it a year.
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,266 posts, read 4,150,962 times
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Everything came together the month I turned 60. I jumped at the chance to retire then and I have absolutely no regrets.
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:34 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,612 posts, read 39,986,663 times
Reputation: 23754
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
What's making me doubt (but not really) my decision is the sudden and premature death of a coworker. It's true that tomorrow is promised to no one....

Dying at work is not in the plan of anyone, but... things happen. If you are in good health, and not in a dangerous job, you might make it through the next yr.

I lost a friend during work last yr. He went out to take a nap in his car and never returned, appeared to be a heart attack.

My best friend's dad died cleaning out his desk on the afternoon AFTER his retirement party.

but... at age 18, I left my co-workers (welders) to go for a job interview. They were killed that afternoon in a grain explosion. Kicking the bucket at age 18 would have saved a lot of trouble....(for many) +/-

Be careful!
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Old 02-18-2017, 10:59 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 740,273 times
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A one year delay won't hurt you and will improve your position. I've seen a lot of people suffer financially from poor retirement planning.
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Old 02-19-2017, 03:03 AM
 
71,653 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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We all know peers who have died and that has been true at any age. They stand out because so few of us actually die younger. So don't get influenced by knowing someone who died . Can you imagine trying to remember all of those who lived ?

As investors we all know someone who exhibited bad investor behavior too and lost their money. But we don't not invest because of it.

Last edited by mathjak107; 02-19-2017 at 04:17 AM..
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Old 02-19-2017, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,522 posts, read 8,770,706 times
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because I loved my work. I did retire at 72, after a new manager gave me a great retirement deal, but still work on odd jobs from former clients and friends.
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:35 AM
 
12,706 posts, read 9,978,586 times
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Peer pressure is often a problem when it comes to major life decisions like this...but at some point if you know what's right for you, you just need the guts/social skill not to let other people be critical of your decisions. It sounds like you have it very well thought out, so perhaps you should just practice the "art of changing the subject".
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:44 AM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,574,131 times
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If I wait more more year and some change, I'd be in a better financial position. Two more years, better. Where to draw the line, and how much is "enough?" I am more looking at the health effects of my job (stress and shift work) and the cost of that to me, and that I am finished with the work itself. Realized recently, I am really pretty good at important aspects of my job. I have enough pride to do a good job when I'm there, but I'd just as soon not be there.

Being home right now recovering from some surgery has shown me the absence of my work community and how much I am still in touch with some few people on the internet (as I will hope to be in retirement). I mean, it's pretty sad if I have to work a graveyard shift to get a good conversation! I hope to become part of the community around my new town to replace the community of work. I have never had a sense of community outside of different jobs and look forward to learning how to do this (volunteering, attending events, city council meetings, etc.)

I realize that other posters do not have to learn how to belong somewhere- in a marriage, in a community, and therefore retiring TO that would be redundant. But when I look back on my life, it's an area where I haven't focused or flourished and consider that as much a plan as any activity planning.

Actually the only work I miss is what I did before I got my RN- news copy editing- and have done it from home while working as an RN. I do hope to find some editing work once I get set up in my new place. It won't be social, but I love the work.
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:49 AM
 
6,267 posts, read 4,740,348 times
Reputation: 12866
I actually found that retirement put me ahead financially. I sold the house and traveled in an RV. My expenses were very low for those 2 years. I did better than if I had continued to work and live in my house and high cost area.
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