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Old 02-24-2017, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
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For a long time I used to believe that if I had to live where there is a winter season, I would want to live where it is a season such that you could almost be guaranteed to be able to engage in winter sports. Where it would pay to have a snowmobile.

Now that I am close to retirement, that has changed. Even though this winter has been extremely mild, I am thinking I wish I had enough money to go to Florida every winter.
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Old 02-24-2017, 07:59 AM
 
Location: 26N x 82W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PierPressure53 View Post
Having lived in a warm weather location most of or life, we are a bit worried about moving to a cold weather retirement area.
I'd take the advice many are offering you, see if you can negotiate yourself into a VRBO (or similar) lease and try it out before you make the leap.
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Old 02-24-2017, 08:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
For a long time I used to believe that if I had to live where there is a winter season, I would want to live where it is a season such that you could almost be guaranteed to be able to engage in winter sports. Where it would pay to have a snowmobile.

Now that I am close to retirement, that has changed. Even though this winter has been extremely mild, I am thinking I wish I had enough money to go to Florida every winter.
My plan when I retire is to rent a place in the south January-March. Still be around here for the holidays and then adios and enjoy warmer weather.
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Old 02-24-2017, 08:21 AM
 
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Back to the OP's original question. Yes, we moved from a very warm Texas climate to a Front Range city this past fall. It would have been smarter to rent for a year as suggested but that involved too many steps to be worth the hassle (renting our house, storing furniture, finding a rental here that takes pets etc.) So we jumped in feet first, sold our house and bought one here. I think there are some new challenges for the newly initiated such as having to wear layers of clothing, driving, leaving behind the food and culture you know, but thus far we have few regrets. I will not miss many of the things that go along with long hot weather seasons - AC everywhere for the moajorty of the year, being perpetually sweaty, mosquitos, fleas, roaches. As long as the sun is shining which it usually is here, the cold is a welcome experience so far.
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Old 02-27-2017, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Mammoth Lakes, CA
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I grew up in southern California where the coldest it ever got was about 40 degrees and that was only at night and during a cold snap. I never saw snow until I was in my 20's. We retired to Mammoth Lakes, California and live at 8200 feet. Mammoth this year has gotten over 400 inches of snow (no joke-- the town has made national news for the snow!)

I miss the warm weather sometimes, but have adjusted to the cold, the wood stove, the wood chopping and all the rest. I like the change of seasons and having four distinct seasons. In southern California, you really only have endless sun.
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Old 02-27-2017, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulysses61 View Post
I grew up in southern California where the coldest it ever got was about 40 degrees and that was only at night and during a cold snap. I never saw snow until I was in my 20's. We retired to Mammoth Lakes, California and live at 8200 feet. Mammoth this year has gotten over 400 inches of snow (no joke-- the town has made national news for the snow!)

I miss the warm weather sometimes, but have adjusted to the cold, the wood stove, the wood chopping and all the rest. I like the change of seasons and having four distinct seasons. In southern California, you really only have endless sun.

I moved to Southern California when I was 14 and except for a four-year period, have lived here ever since. I'm now 72. I can relate to what you are saying. I missed the snow and I missed the change of seasons.


However, in the interest of accuracy for people who have never lived here, your statement that we "really only have endless sun" is a bit of an exaggeration. The weather is noticeably different in the winter and in the summer. Our rain occurs during the winter only (normally), so it is not at all unusual to have overcast periods lasting several days during the winter. Also, temperatures can dip into the 30's overnight, although that is unusual. Winter daytime highs in the lower 50's is about as cold as it gets.
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:00 PM
 
4,432 posts, read 2,611,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PierPressure53 View Post
My wife and I are looking at Twin Falls, Idaho or Idaho Falls, idaho as our retirement location.

Having lived in a warm weather location most of or life, we are a bit worried about moving to a cold weather retirement area.

My question to the forum would be 1st to those retirees like us, that have moved from warm weather areas to colder areas such as Idaho and how they adapted, and was it difficult?

I would also be in search for input from seniors in and how they cope with the winters, and what do they actually do in the winter, besides wait for spring.

Thanks.
John
Well, I am just the opposite. I have lived in the NE for all of my life, and hope to retire to warmth.

Some things to consider:

1] cold...it can get bitter cold, and your joints may ache from that alone, or when the weather patterns/barometric pressures change.

2} snow. Get a snowblower, but don't think that cures all ills. If it's wet and heavy snow, a SB is really of no use. Shoveling, especially a long drive is back breaking work! If it's 2 or 3 inches, ditto,shoveling is really easier.

3} fall and spring. Constant changing temps. Like now here, we are expecting 61 on Wed, and 29 on Thursday. OR you start the day off bundled up at 25 degrees, , only to want shorts and t-shirt in the afternoon at 75 degrees..

4} winter doldrums. TAKE vitamin D. It will help, but when it gets dark at 4:00 in Dec. and doesn't get light until 8 Am, you WILL feel it.

5} CAbin Fever. It's a real thing. After being cooped up inside, even by a roaring fire while "let it snow, let it snow" is playing, you WILL, after a while want to GET OUT. But in bitter cold temps, YOU CAN'T.

6] laundry will pile up faster as winter heavy clothing takes up more room in the washer

7} what do we DO in winter? not much if it ain't indoors.

8} you will constantly be chilled at least for first few years. You will want the heat at 85 degrees, and SURPRISE! when the utility bill comes! you will have to learn in 65-70 degree temps, maybe bundled in sweats, sweaters, fleece , etc just to feel POSSIBLY warm.

9} DO NOT, I REPEAT, DO NOT wash your car from about Dec. 1st to APril 1st. No Matter HOW dirty it gets. Or else you will find yourself FROZEN OUT of your car! Break out the hair dryer and PRAY!

10) prepare your car with an emergency kit with blankets, extra fluids {for you and the car}, a mini shovel, snow/ice melter, food, keep your tank at 3/4 full or full, and STAY off the roads if they advise it. Trust me. GET used to THAT.

11] watch weather reports like a hawk if you have to go out so you know what you are in for.

12} be prepared for LONG power outages, have alternative heat sources {fireplace}, and candles, flashlights {tea light candles actually DO provide some warmth! they are designed to keep tea warm, after all}, and keep peanut better and bread and H2O on hand.

On the other hand, IF you REALLY like the snow and cold, go for it! Maybe you WILL enjoy it.

Happy retirement!
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