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Old 02-19-2017, 07:41 AM
 
6,239 posts, read 4,721,373 times
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How well people cope or even enjoy the cold is a matter of age and health. I did pretty good through my early and mid 60s. That has changed. My wife is afraid to walk on the ice and snow. We know too many people who have slipped and have torn knees and broken bones. It can and does happen to young people as well but the risks go way, way up with age. Not to mention the much longer time needed to heal. I have my share of issues as well. I have Raynauds and my fingers do not tolerate the cold. Heavy gloves barely help. My fingers turn cold and blue. It is not just uncomfortable. I don't want any amputations.


Should I mention the costs? High heating bills, cars that don't last as long and need to be in tiptop condition. I am having my roof rebuilt and reshingled because of the snow dams on the gutters which have leaked into the house and stained ceilings. Then there is cabin fever or even depression from being trapped indoors. I really enjoy outdoor activities, such as hiking, exploring the woods, archery, fishing, photography. Most of those activities are greatly curtailed or impossible in bad weather with inches or feet of snow on the ground. Winter sports are for those who are young and healthy. No way am I going to cross country ski. I did that years ago. Now I just don't have the strength and don't want a twisted ankle or knee or a heart attack. Winter colds and bronchitis are enough.


Surely there must be some good things about cold winter weather. I just cannot think of any.


Sure that first snow can look beautiful. That fades quickly as the winter gloom settles in and the snow turns dirty and never seems to melt.


Aside from winter weather, I suggest you also pay attention to the "culture" of living in either of those Idaho cities. That would concern me as much as the weather, but we all have different perspectives.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:21 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,281 posts, read 4,859,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Yep! Colder climates are basically 8-9 months of hibernation, and then 3-4 months of an explosion of activities. The hibernation is more like cabin-fever as well.

There is a reason why most Northerners would love to retire somewhere warm....we want to minimize or eliminate that 8-9 months of cabin-fever.


Hot & humid climates like where I live are similar - only the hibernation occurs from July-September when it is too miserable to be outdoors. But the longer I live here in Florida, the more I realize I could never deal with the cold anymore. It can be 60 degrees outside and I'm wearing a hoodie and heavy socks IN THE HOUSE.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:35 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,490 posts, read 62,120,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PierPressure53 View Post
...looking at Twin Falls, Idaho or Idaho Falls, idaho
a bit worried about moving to a cold weather retirement area.
There's moving to... and then there's uprooting every penny of equity
and then locking it in somewhere that you have no personal experience of.

If the current southern property/location doesn't suit anymore... sell it.
If it does suit well enough... rent it out.

Then rent a place in UT or ID and actually BE THERE for more than a year
Long enough to experience winter twice.

Then decide if you want to buy. Or not.
Or perhaps repeat the experiment somewhere else.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Southern Most New Jersey
1,099 posts, read 817,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Yep! Colder climates are basically 8-9 months of hibernation, and then 3-4 months of an explosion of activities. The hibernation is more like cabin-fever as well.

There is a reason why most Northerners would love to retire somewhere warm....we want to minimize or eliminate that 8-9 months of cabin-fever.
This post is very true.

While I love the relatively mild weather of the mid-atlaintc I find the colder weather months limits activity. I still do stuff outside but not nearly as much as when the temps are above 50. Even walks are restricted when temps fall below 32. And as noted some people above are not impacted by the cold.

Another important consideration. Is the area in Idaho you are considering cloudy in the winter. Cloudy winters can have an affect on peoples moods. Cabin fever is a real thing to be avoided if possible..

And of course if you are single or with someone your results may vary..
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:45 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,490 posts, read 62,120,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBoy3 View Post
While I love the relatively mild weather of the mid-atlantic
I find the colder weather months limits activity.
I'm from near Baltimore and found this to be true up there.

A bit further south and more inland now ...and find almost the opposite to be true.
Summer has become the hibernation season.

The Air conditioning season here is very long
with oppressively high humidity levels; especially in peak summer.

All of which points out the wisdom of the birds:
migrate seasonally.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:23 AM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,677 posts, read 2,224,193 times
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In 2004 my sister, at the age of 65, had her Florida house trashed by the hurricanes that year. She packed up whatever personal items she and her daughter could fit into two cars and headed for Racine Wisconsin where she had another daughter. That was after living in Florida for 46 years,

My wife and I figured that after one winter there, she would be ready to come back to Florida. That did not happen at all; she loves it there. Winters don't bother her, when the weather is bad (which is not all the time) she just stays inside. Today it is in the upper 50s and sunny; so much for the 8 or 9 months of having to stay inside theory.

Just like so many other things in life, when it comes to weather, one size doesn't fit all. Which, come to think about it, really works out well. Otherwise everyone would be jammed into one part of the country and the rest of it would be vacant.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Out West
273 posts, read 179,316 times
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Having lived in Arizona most of my life, I would add that it's important for anyone who dreams of moving to warm Arizona or similar states to understand that there are 5-6 months here where the heat is intense enough that you just cannot be in it without suffering ill effects. The 'hibernation' period here begins in late May and extends until almost November, although in the second half of October the temps finally drop below 100 degrees. In the past decade I've noticed that air conditioning runs continuously from April through October--the period of heat has definitely gotten longer.

Our active time of year, when it is easy to be outside, is from November through April. The problem is that for several of those months, it gets dark by 5:30 - 6:30 pm, so those of us who are working cannot get out for exercise or just outdoor activities. During the summer months when there is plenty of sunlight left at the end of the work day, the temps can remain above 100 until 10:00 p.m., so not much outdoor activity then either. Once retired, we plan to spend at least late spring through autumn in the coastal PNW. I'm not sure if we will want to remain through the winters though, for all the logical reasons stated by others who responded to this thread. At this point I'm thinking we will likely end up migrating to warmth for 2-3 months of the year.
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Old 02-19-2017, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Pa
166 posts, read 113,091 times
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We are in Phoenix now for the winter coming from Pa. I can not tell you the number of folks we have meet that live in cold climates in the USA and Canada and spend the winter here. Even more who own 2 homes, one here and one North. Everyone comes here in November and leaves in April-May. We spent last winter in Tampa, Fla and hated the nonstop traffic and crowding, we love it here in Phoenix.
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Old 02-19-2017, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TLC1957 View Post
We are in Phoenix now for the winter coming from Pa. I can not tell you the number of folks we have meet that live in cold climates in the USA and Canada and spend the winter here. Even more who own 2 homes, one here and one North. Everyone comes here in November and leaves in April-May. We spent last winter in Tampa, Fla and hated the nonstop traffic and crowding, we love it here in Phoenix.
Isn't the traffic and crowding bad in Peoenix too? Must be even worse in Tampa or you wouldn't have written that.
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Old 02-19-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,556 posts, read 3,656,219 times
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Everyone has their own preference but I think most retired people would desire a more moderate climate. I was all set to say don't do it but I looked at the agricultural zone map and Twin Falls is zone 6a. Santa Fe NM is also in zone 6a and people love it. Daytime temps might be reasonable but there will be a freeze at night that lingers well into what might be a growing season in more southern locations. It might be good to test it out before a final commitment -- rent a small place and spend some time.


https://weatherspark.com/averages/31...-United-States
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