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Old 02-19-2017, 06:56 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,191 posts, read 6,308,074 times
Reputation: 9810

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No place is perfect. I live 5-10 miles from the beach, reasonably mild weather, and I want to be in Hawaii from Dec to Feb and then Canada from July to Aug. the rest of the year I'm happy to be here.
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:18 PM
 
37 posts, read 66,856 times
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[quote=jrkliny;47251097]I suspect a lot of the tolerance and sometimes even enjoyment of the cold and snow is age dependent. Someone who retires young is going to think differently. I know my choices have altered from the time I retired at age 64 until now at age 70. I detest the cold. Do not like shoveling snow and worry about a heart attack. The last snow was very wet and heavy. Just shoveling over a foot off the front porch and sidewalk was enough. My club was going to have an archery shoot. That was snowed out. It has been over a week and I still cannot even walk across the backyard to the wood pile.


Nope, snow and winter weather are for younger people. Those of you who are reaching retirement age might want to take heed. You might be moving again within a very few years.


Meanwhile I am packing for Hawaii!!!!!!!!![/QUOTE

What is your location that it is so cold?
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
...................... It has been over a week and I still cannot even walk across the backyard to the wood pile.
...........................
Why can't you walk across the backyard to the wood pile? Is it uphill/downhill and you're afraid you'll slip and fall in case there is ice underneath the snow? Do you have those ice cleat thingies you attach to the bottom of your boots?
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:33 PM
 
530 posts, read 537,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I am not sure why you want to move to a cold climate and "cope". It seems you are rightly worried about this move.


Anyway, I live in an area with moderate winters. <SNIP> Regardless of the activities, I do not do well in winter. My health declines and I gain weight. I get a lot more exercise and feel better in warmer weather. Each year winter gets harder.
Having lived (born there) in a cold, snowy, wintry-blustery Northeastern city, and then lived another almost-30 years in a Texas city, and lately, here in Sillycon Valley, I'll take that Southern "heat & humidity" over shivering through the cold of winter, any time.
Even here in "NorCal", my old hide is dried-out and itchy and I ache a lot, whereas living in a Southern clime allows my pores to breathe, my sweat glands to operate properly, and my arthritis to flare-up a whole-lot less-frequently.
Most of my Family members have forsaken colder climates for the well feelings they experience when they are in the sub-Tropic and mid-Temperate zones, where snow, ice, and freezing temperatures are an almost-unknown.

The (at least) 2nd priority for us is to retire somewhere where the weather is markedly warmer, which has us looking at two (2) states: Arizona, and Texas.
The 1st priority?? Well, whether or not we can afford to live in any given location. And ...
Almost everywhere is less costly than living here in the former "golden state", so even though it's our #1 priority, that's kind-of a "given" ...
.
If you're happy where you are ... STAY THERE!
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,428,989 times
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Pre-retirement: Silicon Valley -- a moderate climate with no snow.

In Retirement: We spend the winters in Park City UT and ski about 80 days/season. Yes, I've learned about house maintenance in cold climates. We get 400-500 inches of snow each winter (more up on the ski slopes). The coldest it gets is about -20F but that is usually for only a few days. We'll go skiing as long as it is above zero.

We spend the rest of the year in a warm southern climate.

Life's good. No problem acclimating to the weather.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Metropolis IL
1,595 posts, read 1,890,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PierPressure53 View Post
My wife and I are looking at Twin Falls, Idaho or Idaho Falls, idaho as our retirement location.

Having lived in a warm weather location most of or life, we are a bit worried about moving to a cold weather retirement area.

My question to the forum would be 1st to those retirees like us, that have moved from warm weather areas to colder areas such as Idaho and how they adapted, and was it difficult?

I would also be in search for input from seniors in and how they cope with the winters, and what do they actually do in the winter, besides wait for spring.

Thanks.
John
Cold weather involves work, or paying someone to do it for you. There's a reason most retirement communities are in temperate climates
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:34 PM
 
6,213 posts, read 4,718,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Why can't you walk across the backyard to the wood pile? Is it uphill/downhill and you're afraid you'll slip and fall in case there is ice underneath the snow? Do you have those ice cleat thingies you attach to the bottom of your boots?
Several inches of soggy snow and mud beneath. I can't exactly move a heavy load of firewood under those conditions. Nor can I use my outdoor archery target. After a week and a half, most of the snow melted today. Now there is just mud. The ground is probably frozen under the melted snow.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:38 PM
 
416 posts, read 201,553 times
Reputation: 537
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I suspect a lot of the tolerance and sometimes even enjoyment of the cold and snow is age dependent. Someone who retires young is going to think differently. I know my choices have altered from the time I retired at age 64 until now at age 70. I detest the cold. Do not like shoveling snow and worry about a heart attack. The last snow was very wet and heavy. Just shoveling over a foot off the front porch and sidewalk was enough. My club was going to have an archery shoot. That was snowed out. It has been over a week and I still cannot even walk across the backyard to the wood pile.


Nope, snow and winter weather are for younger people. Those of you who are reaching retirement age might want to take heed. You might be moving again within a very few years.


Meanwhile I am packing for Hawaii!!!!!!!!!

This......... "take heed" -- you WILL be shoveling snow, "winter weather for younger people"

We got the heck out of Idaho, found Hilo hawaii for the same price. Nowhere's perfect, we complain when it gets down to 71 degrees. Oh well, nowhere is perfect.

More and more retired moving here. Not much of a place for younger people. Not much night life and full of minimum wage jobs.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:03 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,676 posts, read 2,223,468 times
Reputation: 5213
Quote:
Originally Posted by movedintime View Post
This......... "take heed" -- you WILL be shoveling snow, "winter weather for younger people"

We got the heck out of Idaho, found Hilo hawaii for the same price. Nowhere's perfect, we complain when it gets down to 71 degrees. Oh well, nowhere is perfect.

More and more retired moving here. Not much of a place for younger people. Not much night life and full of minimum wage jobs.
I really like the Big Island and if I could afford it, Honakaa would be my choice. But my wife nixed even the thought of doing that. She likes visiting, but that is all.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:11 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,191 posts, read 6,308,074 times
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My husband couldn't get out of Big Island fast enough. We were on the west side. He didn't like taste of the water, maybe volcano ash or something. Good thing I didn't buy 3 acres like I almost did, when land was dirt cheap, year 2000. It was going for $22k for 3 acres.
Like I said it's very much depend on the person.
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