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Old 02-19-2017, 09:26 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,676 posts, read 2,222,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
My husband couldn't get out of Big Island fast enough. We were on the west side. He didn't like taste of the water, maybe volcano ash or something. Good thing I didn't buy 3 acres like I almost did, when land was dirt cheap, year 2000. It was going for $22k for 3 acres.
Like I said it's very much depend on the person.
On our trip we spent the first week in Kona and then moved around the island for the next two weeks. We did not care for Kona at all and Puna not so much, But did like Hilo and the Hamakua Coast.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Pre-retirement: Silicon Valley -- a moderate climate with no snow.

In Retirement: We spend the winters in Park City UT and ski about 80 days/season. Yes, I've learned about house maintenance in cold climates. We get 400-500 inches of snow each winter (more up on the ski slopes). The coldest it gets is about -20F but that is usually for only a few days. We'll go skiing as long as it is above zero.

We spend the rest of the year in a warm southern climate.

Life's good. No problem acclimating to the weather.
Unique personality and tolerance. There is a reason most retirement resorts are in milder climates, not in alpine altitudes, northern Michigan, or Maine.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:13 PM
 
6,212 posts, read 4,715,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRR View Post
...... We did not care for Kona at all and Puna not so much.......
WOW! I don't know what part of Puna you saw. I have seen most of it including:
Kalapana (currently a spectacular overlook of lava entering the ocean)
Kalapana-Kapoho Rd along the coast including the beaches
Kapoho tidal areas
Lava Tree State Monument
Cape Kumukahi
Luquins Mexican restaurant in Pahoa
The Orchid nursery near Volcano
Puna Forest Reserve
Macadamia Nut farms




Puna even includes Volcano National Park!!!!!!
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:20 PM
 
844 posts, read 745,176 times
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There are many retirees who live in cold and snowy areas. The northern states do not clear out as soon as they hit a certain age. In fact, Wyoming is suppose to be the new Florida. South Dakota and many Midwestern states are also very popular. I believe Maine is also popular.


First, while still in a warm climate, I would visit (for as long as possible) where you want to live during peak winter. If possible, go over a couple of winters and see how it goes. Are roads cleared timely? Do you like the cold? Is the area overcast all the time? Some places are overcast all winter. Others like Colorado may be cold and snowy, but the sun shines every day. I don't know about Idaho.


Subarus probably make the best winter/ snow cars. Get good snow tires. That will help you get around. Consider installing a remote starter. You can start the car while inside, and the car will be warm in a couple minutes. Subarus also come with heated seats. Just make sure you leave that on so the seats will also be warm when you start the car.


As with any age, do you have indoor hobbies? Woodworking, reading, knitting, etc? How about outdoor sports, or maybe concerts, movies, lectures? Do you volunteer now? Winters are easier when you don't just sit home and look at 4 walls. If the weather is bad on a day, do a hobby at home. (Just like ppl do hobbies inside all summer in Florida, because you can't be outside until it's dark- nope, forgot, can't go out then either, because the man-eating bugs come out)


Consider living in town/ city where shopping, doctors, etc are close by. No body at any age finds it fun to travel an hr or more (and miles and miles) in the cold and snow to get somewhere. Maybe you will be able to walk to shopping if needed, or get a bus or taxi in an emergency.


Consider a condo or other "community" housing. This way, YOU will not be responsible for snow shoveling, clearing ice etc. You just get up and go. This is helpful if you shouldn't be shoveling snow due to a medical condition (or you really don't want to).


And if you can't take any particular time during the winter, do what everybody else does- go south for a month or two. Then you can laugh at them when everyone down there is melting into the pavement and you're sitting outside on your porch.


It's all a mind-set. Good luck.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:39 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,527 posts, read 39,903,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Unique personality and tolerance. There is a reason most retirement resorts are in milder climates, not in alpine altitudes, northern Michigan, or Maine.
Not so rare for active retirement; (especially for snow skiing) I have several friends who retired to Mtn towns. Many in Estes Park Colorado (Popular retirement destination).

Also there are 3+ 'seasons' of retirement, and I doubt I will be staying in one place during 40+ yrs in retirement.


Quote:
The northern states do not clear out as soon as they hit a certain age. In fact, Wyoming is suppose to be the new Florida. South Dakota and many Midwestern states are also very popular. I believe Maine is also popular.
WY fell off my retirement list, but not because of the cold. (Home equity risk during resell, High transportation costs, and poor Intl airport access was important to me) I plan to return to WY when I am feeble (Senior home within the Hot Springs State Park).

Of my Colorado / WY / SD / NE / MN retiree friends (~50 - 100), less than 10% fled to warmer climate. 1/2 of them were following grandkids / jobs. My parents and Inlaws stayed put @ >5,000ft. But... mtn states can be Banana Belt compared to midwest (at least you get SUNSHINE!!)! the SNOW is light, crunchy (good traction / melts by noon!), and blows away in a 'puff'. I rode my bike to work all but 3 days my last yr in Colorado.

granted... cold clime is not for every retiree, but also is not impossible.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:45 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,676 posts, read 2,222,849 times
Reputation: 5213
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
WOW! I don't know what part of Puna you saw. I have seen most of it including:
Kalapana (currently a spectacular overlook of lava entering the ocean)
Kalapana-Kapoho Rd along the coast including the beaches
Kapoho tidal areas
Lava Tree State Monument
Cape Kumukahi
Luquins Mexican restaurant in Pahoa
The Orchid nursery near Volcano
Puna Forest Reserve
Macadamia Nut farms




Puna even includes Volcano National Park!!!!!!
We stayed in Volcano for three days and rode around Puna when we were staying in Hilo. Enjoyed visiting it but it would not be the area where I would want to live in retirement. Different strokes for different folks.
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Old 02-20-2017, 04:11 AM
 
678 posts, read 463,901 times
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here in New Jersey it got up to 70 degrees yesterday in February, it is considered a "cold weather state" now that is highly unusual but you do get mild days in the winter, I would say more like three months of spending more time indoors, not hibernating.

on the east coast people may retire to a more northern state to stay closer to the kids and grandkids, but escape the high taxes we have here.
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Old 02-20-2017, 07:10 AM
 
6,743 posts, read 3,851,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRR View Post
On our trip we spent the first week in Kona and then moved around the island for the next two weeks. We did not care for Kona at all and Puna not so much, But did like Hilo and the Hamakua Coast.

We love Hilo. Bought a condo there and lived full time when we first retired. It was great! Swimming every day at Onekahaha, going to the farmer's market, and making friends. We returned to mainland to be near grandkids, but still vacation in Hilo every chance we get.
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Old 02-20-2017, 07:24 AM
 
6,212 posts, read 4,715,040 times
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I was writing about enjoying a visit to the Big Island and to Puna. I would not want to live there either. It is a beautiful place to visit especially in the winter but otherwise it is more like a third world country. That impression was only strengthened by the separate language, the lack of industry, jobs, or work ethic and the overall distrust and lack of respect for Haoles. There are plenty who would rather return to the era of the Kingdom. My BIL is content living there although I do notice he is typically there only 6 months or less and the time seems to be decreasing.


I have found there are a lot of places I like to visit but would not want to live there permanently.
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Old 02-20-2017, 08:26 AM
 
Location: USA
6,223 posts, read 5,353,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masterchef1 View Post
here in New Jersey it got up to 70 degrees yesterday in February, it is considered a "cold weather state" now that is highly unusual but you do get mild days in the winter, I would say more like three months of spending more time indoors, not hibernating.

on the east coast people may retire to a more northern state to stay closer to the kids and grandkids, but escape the high taxes we have here.

I'm also from NJ, and our winters are mild IMO. In the winter if I go outside during the day and it's sunny I only wear a sweatshirt.
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