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Old 02-20-2017, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,428,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Unique personality and tolerance. There is a reason most retirement resorts are in milder climates, not in alpine altitudes, northern Michigan, or Maine.
Fascinatingly, we know many retirees who who like it here. The snow by itself isn't the attraction -- it is the skiing, tubing, sledding, snowmobiling, X-Country skiing, etc. Then add to that some great restaurants, the Sundance Film Festival, excellent free public transportation and it is a very liveable place to retire.
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Old 02-20-2017, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,217 posts, read 44,878,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Fascinatingly, we know many retirees who who like it here. The snow by itself isn't the attraction -- it is the skiing, tubing, sledding, snowmobiling, X-Country skiing, etc. Then add to that some great restaurants, the Sundance Film Festival, excellent free public transportation and it is a very liveable place to retire.
Tell me about the free public transportation - have never heard about that.

When I lived in IF, we had very cheap bus transportation out to the site where I worked at the time (INL, at that time called INEL). It was not free but very cheap. This made a world of difference, if I had needed to drive myself out there every day, (about 45 miles) in the winter, I would have moved on after the first winter I think.

Sporty, I think you are doing this right - stay active doing stuff you actually like to do, and you will more or less "stay young".
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Old 02-20-2017, 06:41 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I don't agree that the colder climates are 8 or 9 months of winter. Definitely not! way exaggerative. Why exaggerate so much. There are 5 months of winter. (5.5 or 6 months at the most infrequently)

And with climate change, some places have been having quite a bit less snow and ice, and way less cold temps for quite a while.

And people are not 'hibernating' for 8 or 9 months because there is not winter for 8 or 9 months.
I grew up in NJ and spent my adult life in MD where we got a good snowfall once every 3 to 5 years. I am now on my third winter in VT. It is beautiful all year round. When it's cold outside I turn up the heat in the house. When I go out, I dress for the weather. Dog walks are shorter in the winter but we still go to the dog park and watch them run and play in the snow. It is wonderful.

People around here walk a lot, all year round. I have met many seniors here who are so much healthier than those I used to see further south in metro areas. I have fibromyalgia and I am a klutz, so I do not ski or snowboard or go ice skating, but many older people still do. Summers are absolutely divine!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Fern435 View Post
Tolerance for cold/tolerance for heat and humidity vary from person to person. It is a huge exaggeration to claim that northern climates have 8-9 months of hibernation and a short flurry of summer activities. We have lived all over the United States and chose to move farther north to Maine for several reasons. The colder climate was one of them.

In New England, there are typically 1-2 months where the weather and temperatures might be less than hospitable. The weather changes often here, even in winter. Some winters are milder than others. Having an efficient heating system, a home that can withstand winter, a Subaru , and proper clothing/base layers/footwear make it simple to stay active during the winter months. We cross-country ski on the ponds and in the woods, walk our dogs on plowed roads and trails, and shovel snow. Autumn and winter are my favorite seasons! Very cozy and enjoyable. It's easy to plan trips to town around winter weather. Snow storms don't sneak up on folks here. Less crime and fewer natural disasters in colder climates, too.
Fern describes it well. But I would say more like 3 and a half months of very cold weather. But again, with warmer days along the way. It was near 50 yesterday. (This is VT. I don't know about Idaho)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
We lived in the Phoenix area for 25+ years until 2012 when we moved to Raleigh (we were age 55 and 70 at that time). The first winter was hell for me because of the cold and snow. Each winter gets a little easier, but I still dread them. When it snows, we hole up in the house (except for short walks to take the dog out).

The summer humidity is very difficult for DH, and it seems to bother him more every year. If I croaked tomorrow, I believe he would move back to phoenix.

Don't minimize the affect of weather on your retirement life!
O' come on... how often do you get snow in North Carolina? Maybe you forgot to go buy winter clothes when you moved there? It's the summer heat+humidity that makes that area uncomfortable for a rather long summer season.


To the OP: go on the City-Data forums for Idaho and other northern states to read what people have said there about the climate.
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Old 02-20-2017, 07:43 PM
 
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Wouldn't be my retirement town choices. Why move to cold in winter location full time? Most retired people I know who live where it snows head south for winter months.

Also if it makes any difference to you I believe both communities are predominately LDS. In some Idaho communities there is definite overlap & not a lot of separation between church & business or government. If you are not a member, it may be something to check on.
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Old 02-20-2017, 09:13 PM
 
9,578 posts, read 8,880,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Yep! Colder climates are basically 8-9 months of hibernation, and then 3-4 months of an explosion of activities. The hibernation is more like cabin-fever as well.

There is a reason why most Northerners would love to retire somewhere warm....we want to minimize or eliminate that 8-9 months of cabin-fever.
In what place in the United States does one have 8 or 9 MONTHS of cabin fever..please enlighten us.
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Old 02-20-2017, 11:01 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,537 posts, read 39,914,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
In what place in the United States does one have 8 or 9 MONTHS of cabin fever..please enlighten us.
My climate would qualify if Rain / Drizzle kept you indoors.

280 days / yr cloud cover; 200+ with precip. thus I have 'Other plans' most of the time

Wood stove has been going almost non-stop this winter (when we are home).
Ice storms, had another last week....
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Old 02-20-2017, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
In what place in the United States does one have 8 or 9 MONTHS of cabin fever..please enlighten us.
Yes, I think that poster was engaging in exaggeration, although if people refuse to go outdoors just because there is snow on the ground, they can easily get cabin fever in two or three or four months. Hell, I get cabin fever if I stay inside more than 24 hours. Even if all I do outside on a given day is walk a half mile to a restaurant, or go in the car to a store, that relieves the cabin fever for me.

There is a different sort of cabin fever (which probably shouldn't be called that) along the Gulf Coast in the summer. The heat and humidity keep a lot of people prisoners of air conditioning; they go from air conditioned homes to air conditioned cars to air conditioned restaurants/stores/workplaces/movies/etc. And unlike the dryer west, there is no relief at night. Once, while visiting my mother for two weeks in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, I decided to beat the heat by getting up before the sun every other day to go jogging. Was that ever in vain! I would return to her appartment just as it was getting light, dripping with sweat and cursing the climate.

Where I live, even if it gets up to 105 during the day, which it does occasionally, it will go down to at least 75 overnight. And even that 105 is about like 95 in the humid parts of the country in terms of suffering from the heat.
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Old 02-21-2017, 03:16 AM
 
Location: R.I.
970 posts, read 603,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
In what place in the United States does one have 8 or 9 MONTHS of cabin fever..please enlighten us.
Being a life long New Englander I was wondering the same thing ??? And although I can't speak for every northerner, not everyone here including myself desires an endless summer. Where I live, if we are lucky summer weather begins in mid May and then it starts to cool down right after Labor Day. That is enough for me because Fall is my favorite season. Winter then starts showing it's face after Thanksgiving, and unless we get a freak late snow storm or cold wave, spring weather starts around Easter then what seems to be a blink of an eye it is Memorial Day and summer has arrived.

Not sure what area the country the OP noted that has 8-9 months of winter, but having been as far north as Alaska in the summer, the weather I experienced there was not much different than the weather I left in R.I. which was lovely.
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Old 02-21-2017, 06:20 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,279 posts, read 4,856,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
In what place in the United States does one have 8 or 9 MONTHS of cabin fever..please enlighten us.

Barrow, Alaska??
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Old 02-21-2017, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,459 posts, read 5,920,270 times
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Why not spend a winter there and see how it effects you physically (arthritis?) and mentally by being inside for such a long part of the year before making this decision? For me the thought of "getting through" 1/2 of the year at an advanced age when every year counts makes little sense.
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