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Old 02-18-2017, 08:25 PM
 
37 posts, read 66,818 times
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My wife and I are looking at Twin Falls, Idaho or Idaho Falls, idaho as our retirement location.

Having lived in a warm weather location most of or life, we are a bit worried about moving to a cold weather retirement area.

My question to the forum would be 1st to those retirees like us, that have moved from warm weather areas to colder areas such as Idaho and how they adapted, and was it difficult?

I would also be in search for input from seniors in and how they cope with the winters, and what do they actually do in the winter, besides wait for spring.

Thanks.
John
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:36 PM
 
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I am not sure why you want to move to a cold climate and "cope". It seems you are rightly worried about this move.


Anyway, I live in an area with moderate winters. Next week I fly to Hawaii for 3 weeks. I also have a number of indoor activities: indoor archery, photography in greenhouses, and classes at the local U. Regardless of the activities, I do not do well in winter. My health declines and I gain weight. I get a lot more exercise and feel better in warmer weather. Each year winter gets harder.
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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People differ in their ability to adapt, whether the adaptation is to climate or anything else. Therefore I don't think any of us can predict how you will fare. It could be that your wife will adapt well but that you will not, or vice-versa. It could be that neither of you will adapt well, or that both of you will. Therefore I would say: Be prepared to move again in case things don't work out. It would be a huge mistake to lock yourselves into a situation where you might be miserable for the rest of your lives.

Is there some way you could rent for the first winter to make a possible retreat easier?
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:07 PM
 
381 posts, read 352,121 times
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I lived my entire life in the milder climates of the U.S. (Ala, Tx, Florida, southern Cal) and then retired to northern Colorado. I invested in good winter boots, clothes, tires, etc. I moved back to the southern area five years later. The cold did not bother me. The length of the winter was the bad part and the early sunset. Nine months of winter. UGH! Also neighbors did not sit on the porches those months, did not linger at the mailbox for a chat, did not have barbecues. I also believe you should rent for the first year.
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:43 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,524 posts, read 39,903,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PierPressure53 View Post
My wife and I are looking at Twin Falls, Idaho or Idaho Falls, idaho as our retirement location.
.... what do they actually do in the winter, besides wait for spring.

Thanks.
John
Great choices! They see quite a bit of sun, Flurries of snow, so you can continue most activities all winter (such as nice brisk walks / bike rides...)

US winter... an excellent time to go to NZ or Australia. (we volunteered at a camp / vocational school last winter in AUST for free room and board)

or... You can travel! (fly out of SLC on SWA)

or... plan your garden and adventures for next summer.

Indoor hobbies are nice if you have a woodstove! Quilting, auto restoration, wood work (more fuel for the woodstove)

Reading!
Designing / inventing new products.
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Old 02-18-2017, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Pa
166 posts, read 112,908 times
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Solution spend the winter Nov-April someplace warm such as AZ and the rest of the year in Idaho.
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Old 02-18-2017, 11:08 PM
 
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I'll start by saying that the suggestions I will offer all work for me, but they are merely that, suggestions, as your lifestyle might differ considerably from mine. I moved from Northern Virginia to Michigan when I retired. Not as drastic a change as you're contemplating, but still to a colder, snowier and windier climate. The first suggestion is one I've made before on this board. If it all possible, get an attached garage. I can't emphasize enough how important this has become to my comfort and convenience in the winter, and the older you get, the more important it is. Ours is not actually attached, but is close, and we put in a sidewalk with a sturdy railing to improve the walk. Attached would have been better, though.

Another recommendation is to get a couple of pieces of exercise equipment that you have room for, and that you like enough that you might actually use. These are great for days when you just can't get out and do much. Of course, this becomes much less important if you're close to a good gym and or pool, or if you are limber enough to be active outside in the snow.

Another suggestion is to adjust your schedule in the winter, so that you are doing your socializing, volunteering, eating out, and errands mostly during the day. Driving at night, which becomes problematic as you get older for many, is hazardous for anyone in the winter, as is walking in and out of buildings on icy sidewalks in the dark. Since we are retired, might as well take advantage of it, and get stuff done during the day. Besides, curling up in a warm room with a book at night while a snowstorm rages outside is so pleasant.

I can't really take advantage of outdoor activities in the winter, because of arthritis issues. There are many people in their 60s 70s and 80s, though, who get out and enjoy the snow. A good many of my friends, however, take the precaution of having a good set of those grips you attach to your boots.

I traded in my car for a Subaru Forester two years ago. It's great to have a good snow car. I have elderly parents who live 1 mile from me, and I go there twice a day if it all possible. Sometimes more often, if urgent issues arise, like my father not being able to restart his Netflix movie after pausing it. �� It's been much easier driving over there every day these last two winters with a car made for this climate.

That's all I can think of. In our small community, a few people slip on ice each winter and end up with casts and splints, so while you don't want to end up peering fearfully from the window all winter, you also would be wise to take whatever precautions suit your lifestyle, state of health, and temperament.

The profound beauty of snow and ice in a rural area is well worth these cautions and compromises. I often step outside briefly at night (holding onto my railing!) just to stand and look at the moon and stars reflecting on the snow and the icy lake. There is no other light, just the white glimmer of snow.

We won't talk about when it warms up and the melting snow turns the gravel roads to mud.
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Old 02-19-2017, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,139,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lastfire View Post
I lived my entire life in the milder climates of the U.S. (Ala, Tx, Florida, southern Cal) and then retired to northern Colorado. I invested in good winter boots, clothes, tires, etc. I moved back to the southern area five years later. The cold did not bother me. The length of the winter was the bad part and the early sunset. Nine months of winter. UGH! Also neighbors did not sit on the porches those months, did not linger at the mailbox for a chat, did not have barbecues. I also believe you should rent for the first year.
Yep! Colder climates are basically 8-9 months of hibernation, and then 3-4 months of an explosion of activities. The hibernation is more like cabin-fever as well.

There is a reason why most Northerners would love to retire somewhere warm....we want to minimize or eliminate that 8-9 months of cabin-fever.
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Old 02-19-2017, 12:14 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,524 posts, read 39,903,732 times
Reputation: 23629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
... The hibernation is more like cabin-fever as well.
....
and the options...

Having had yet ANOTHER ice storm this week... we are OUTTA here (again)

We will be sipping Tiger Beer and Eating Satay street food next week at this time.
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Old 02-19-2017, 12:44 AM
 
5,422 posts, read 3,440,673 times
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I don't agree that the colder climates are 8 or 9 months of winter. Definitely not! way exaggerative. Why exaggerate so much. There are 5 months of winter. (5.5 or 6 months at the most infrequently)

And with climate change, some places have been having quite a bit less snow and ice, and way less cold temps for quite a while.

And people are not 'hibernating' for 8 or 9 months because there is not winter for 8 or 9 months.

Last edited by matisse12; 02-19-2017 at 12:59 AM..
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