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Old 02-21-2017, 01:06 PM
 
6,254 posts, read 4,734,369 times
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balance4life, I think that was an absolutely outstanding summary.
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Old 02-21-2017, 01:09 PM
 
6,254 posts, read 4,734,369 times
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BellaDL, there we go. You have indeed accomplished much and have thought about your goals and purpose in life. Why you would want to downplay this is beyond me. Let your many accomplishments inspire others.
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Old 02-21-2017, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Idaho
1,454 posts, read 1,155,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
BellaDL, there we go. You have indeed accomplished much and have thought about your goals and purpose in life. Why you would want to downplay this is beyond me. Let your many accomplishments inspire others.
I just do what I have to, want to and like without pondering what are my life purposes. Yes, I set my personal goals but do not think that they are my life purposes. If needed, I lower the goals or focus on something else more doable, within my capability and desirable effort.

I am proud of my accomplishments and certainly do not downplay them when I think they are trivial in comparison to what my mother and many like her have done with their life considering what were given to them.

I am inspired by many life stories here especially from the ones who had overcome major obstacles in their life be it injuries, illnesses (both physical and mental) or other major life upheavals.

If someone else don't set goals, define their life purposes and just try to fulfill their daily obligations, that's fine with me too. People should live their life the way the want and not because society or others tell them what they should do. If a person not being a burden to society, do their duties and happy, why should anyone care? why should they be 'inspired' and try to model their life after others unless they want to do it.

This is what I told my daughter when she was facing teenager's angst. It's your life. The future is in your own hand. Make your decision and prepare to live with the consequences. She decided to quit playing the piano when she was 16 in spite of the fact that she is naturally gifted. Her piano teacher thought that she could be a concert pianist if she had put her mind to it. Years later, she resumed her playing while in vet school and joined a band as a keyboardist. They cut 2 albums and won 1st place in several university band competitions. She is now too busy as a vet to play any instruments. My nephew quit playing the piano after he won 1st prize in a statewide competition. He switched his focus to violin, got a master degree in music education and now makes a living as a violin teacher at a Suzuki school and a college.

I don't do anything significant lately besides household duties, taking care of my injured husband and my dog. I had just finished modifying some booties for her to go over her sore swollen ankle so that she could take her daily hike without scraping it. She was diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma. There are several big tumors on a hind leg. The only possible fix is amputation. She is 12 years old. We decide not to go through with the treatment. She has lived a purpose-free but very happy life. She serves a good purpose of keeping us happy and healthy (with her demand on daily hike) but she does not know it and does not care. She just lives and it is the way I feel.

Last edited by BellaDL; 02-21-2017 at 03:27 PM..
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Old 02-21-2017, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
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So I just helped re-home a 12 year old kitty whom the no-kill shelters wouldn't take because they said she was too old, they're full and she wouldn't stand a good chance of being adopted.

So now she has a great new home to live out her "golden years."

If that's all I'm ever remembered for, that's fine with me. Anyway I'm not keeping score.
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Old 02-21-2017, 02:58 PM
 
4,343 posts, read 6,058,509 times
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My dad left me the best legacy. He was a genuinely nice man who loved his children to the fullest and he taught me not to settle for anything less. I married a genuinely nice man and raised a son who is happy in his marriage and business life. I want to pass down love. Hokey maybe, but the best thing I can do is unconditionally love my grandkids through better and worse,
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Old 02-21-2017, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 12,309,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AgeBrilliantly View Post
What is your purpose?
"He made grocery checkers smile and waitresses laugh out loud."

If I live so that those things may be said of me, I probably got the rest of it close to right as well.
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Old 02-21-2017, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,085 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Even a drooling, demented, incontinent, helpless person can leave a legacy in that they gave someone else the opportunity to serve.
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Old 02-21-2017, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,085 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Now, c'mon, I KNOW you old people know Ralph Waldo Emerson. We used this for my father's funeral card:

"To laugh often and much; To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; To earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; To appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; To leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition; To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded."
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Old 02-21-2017, 04:27 PM
 
7,925 posts, read 5,042,332 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldwoman View Post
I have come to the conclusion that we are a mostly delusional animal, pushed along by our genetic material that is a result of evolution.
This is an elegant point, satisfying in the important sense of putting a reliable floor underneath us. I am ultimately an animal, and if I failed in attaining my objectives, that merely means so disabusing of my delusions. Success and failure themselves are delusions, the concoctions of what please us to be true, rather than some objective truth or incontrovertible goodness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
The problem I have is that when an acquaintance or friend dies, I think "Such wasted potential. Did they wish they had made more of their lives?"...
If I correctly understood BellaDL's point, there is a kind of sliding-scale, for what is reasonable to expect from a person. We've discussed here that possible "talent" is overrated, and is secondary to dedication, tenacity, attitude. Maybe so. But I think that even say tenacity is a "gene", and some people are naturally more tenacious. Talent, tenacity, whatever. Take the overall amalgamation of these qualities. Well then, those who have more of them, are such, that more ought to be expected of them.

Returning to fluffythewondercat's point, as I understand it, is that more output is expected from people who have so to speak enjoyed more input. If your parents are impoverished illiterate peasants in India, there is I suppose no regret in staying yourself illiterate. I your parents are college-professors in Palo Alto CA, and you are of normal intelligence and mental faculties, but refuse to learn to read, well then, something's amiss, something deeply regrettable.

Many of us, I think, crave not only plaudits for what we'd like to regard as a life well lived, but dispensation or forgiveness for having fallen short. We want to be eased and consoled, that if we didn't earn the degree or didn't attain some higher mark, or even if we failed to save a life when given the opportunity, that that's OK, that we are not cads or scoundrels or degenerates, but fallible and ultimately OK people. This dispensation is harder to get, the more we introspect and ponder our duties. We are, as goes the cliche, our own most strident critics.

Whether we're no longer young, or still semi-young, I ask this: how do we silence that strident critic, without becoming walking vegetables?
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Old 02-21-2017, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
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I have enjoyed this thread immensely because the topic is something that really matters.
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