U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-24-2017, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,263 posts, read 594,647 times
Reputation: 2782

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Fake news again from the NYT. Read the comments from people who have experience with real people with Alzheimer's, some don't sleep at all.
The article is reporting on a study about a change in sleep patterns that occurs a decade before the onset of dementia, not "real people with Alzheimer's." The overuse of the term "fake news" is dangerous in a society that relies on the free press. This article reports on a REAL study. Your disagreement with the article or the conclusions of the study does not make it "fake news."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-24-2017, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,424 posts, read 4,186,192 times
Reputation: 5726
I am looking forward to never having to lay in bed knowing I have to get up, but can't get back to sleep because I have something going around in my head. Once I retire in 104 days, if that happens, I will just get up and go into the other room and watch TV until I fall asleep. I almost always get up at first light anyway, because the dog wants to go out. After I retire I can just go back to bed. Probably use less coffee at that point!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,265 posts, read 6,351,451 times
Reputation: 9885
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
The article is reporting on a study about a change in sleep patterns that occurs a decade before the onset of dementia, not "real people with Alzheimer's." The overuse of the term "fake news" is dangerous in a society that relies on the free press. This article reports on a REAL study. Your disagreement with the article or the conclusions of the study does not make it "fake news."
I'm sure you've read reports that lack of sleep also cause real health issues right? The pattern depends on the people. It's inappropriate for someone to post the NYT link on this thread. Scaremongering sounds like fake news to me. Perhaps it's overuse because there are just more fake news.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 02-24-2017 at 08:30 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2017, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,419 posts, read 7,937,494 times
Reputation: 53551
My sleep patterns never really changed after I retired. I always worked afternoon and nights and I usually still only sleep 5 or 6 hours. I have noticed lately that I fall asleep watching TV or a movie a lot. Naps are bad for me because I'll be up all night if I sleep an hour or so. I guess that shift work is still very much ingrained and my body doesn't need that much sleep. I actually slept 8 straight hours a couple of weeks ago and that felt great. That only happens once every few months.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2017, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,263 posts, read 594,647 times
Reputation: 2782
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I'm sure you've read reports that lack of sleep also cause real health issues right? The pattern depends on the people. It's inappropriate for someone to post the NYT link on this thread. Scaremongering sounds like fake news to me. Perhaps it's overuse because there are just more fake news.
"Fake news" would be the NYT deliberately writing an article on a study that they knew was never actually conducted, i.e. totally made up. Your disagreement with the conclusions of the study or whether it scares you, does not make it "fake news."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2017, 09:38 AM
 
9,469 posts, read 5,268,978 times
Reputation: 3238
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeelinLow View Post
I left my last part-time contract job end of January. They called up out of the blue and their need for my services ended. It was my last connection to a profession I'd had for 28 years and I was planning on ending it in March when my SS starts. Needless to say I was elated to be done with it sooner.
Since then I have slept like a baby. Deep, relaxed, dream-filled sleep. Day naps pop up some afternoons and they are ''mini heavens''. I wake up refreshed and my whole body feels deeply relaxed in a new and wonderful way. I especially love to nap by the window during rain storms.
I figure it's a body-soul ''unwinding'' after years of tension. Whatever, it feels so nice.
Did any of you go through similar after retirement?
Same! After retiring I started sleeping better than I had in decades.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2017, 06:27 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
Reputation: 10910
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyram View Post



Don't sweat it.....once the weight of working and living your life according to someone else's clock & demands is gone it will feel like a tremendous burden is off your shoulders and you'll sleep better than you ever have. After a short period of no alarm clock blaring in your head to get you up and when you realize that it's OK and you don't NEED to get up will seem like heaven and you'll sleep like a baby.
Unfortunately, most of the science thus far indicates that by one's middle years, sleep deficit has already kicked off the process. It may not be possible to reverse simply by having more hours of sleep in one's latter years.

In my case sleep deficit is not a result of insomnia. It's a result of simply not allocating enough hours for sleeping.

If / when I cease working I'll immediately be sleeping 10 - 12 hours, like I now do on weekends and some days off.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2017, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,696 posts, read 33,714,187 times
Reputation: 51936
I sleep less. I go to bed late and wake up early.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2017, 07:35 AM
 
26,013 posts, read 33,032,767 times
Reputation: 32251
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeelinLow View Post
I left my last part-time contract job end of January. They called up out of the blue and their need for my services ended. It was my last connection to a profession I'd had for 28 years and I was planning on ending it in March when my SS starts. Needless to say I was elated to be done with it sooner.
Since then I have slept like a baby. Deep, relaxed, dream-filled sleep. Day naps pop up some afternoons and they are ''mini heavens''. I wake up refreshed and my whole body feels deeply relaxed in a new and wonderful way. I especially love to nap by the window during rain storms.
I figure it's a body-soul ''unwinding'' after years of tension. Whatever, it feels so nice.
Did any of you go through similar after retirement?
LOL! I have always enjoyed sleeping!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2017, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,455 posts, read 1,157,295 times
Reputation: 5503
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
The article is reporting on a study about a change in sleep patterns that occurs a decade before the onset of dementia, not "real people with Alzheimer's." The overuse of the term "fake news" is dangerous in a society that relies on the free press. This article reports on a REAL study. Your disagreement with the article or the conclusions of the study does not make it "fake news."
Totally agree!

I am quoting below some details from the NY Times article and more information from the quoted SCIENTIFIC study

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/22/w....city-data.com

Quote:
Using data from 2,457 people, average age 72, who were part of a study in Framingham, Mass., the researchers found that those with a new habit of excessive slumber were at a greater risk of all forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s, which is characterized by a buildup of beta amyloid, a toxic protein fragment that forms plaques in the brain.
“My suspicion is that this is a compensatory mechanism: that at a time when amyloid is building up in the brain, people may be sleeping longer as the body is reacting and trying to remove it from the brain,” Dr. Seshadri added.
Prolonged sleep duration as a marker of early neurodegeneration predicting incident dementia

Quote:

Methods: Self-reported total hours of sleep were examined in the Framingham Heart Study (n = 2,457, mean age 72 ± 6 years, 57% women) as a 3-level variable: <6 hours (short), 6–9 hours (reference), and >9 hours (long), and was related to the risk of incident dementia over 10 years, and cross-sectionally to total cerebral brain volume (TCBV) and cognitive performance.

Results: We observed 234 cases of all-cause dementia over 10 years of follow-up. In multivariable analyses, prolonged sleep duration was associated with an increased risk of incident dementia....

Conclusions: Prolonged sleep duration may be a marker of early neurodegeneration and hence a useful clinical tool to identify those at a higher risk of progressing to clinical dementia within 10 years.
More Than 9 Hours Of Sleep Could Indicate Alzheimer's Disease: Here Are Other Warning Signs Of Dementia : HEALTH : Tech Times

Quote:
In a new study published in the journal Neurology, Matthew Pase, from Boston University School of Medicine, and colleagues followed a group of adults for a period of 10 years and asked them how long they typically sleep at night to examine the link between sleep duration and likelihood of developing dementia.

Although the researchers did not find heightened dementia risk for individuals who had been sleeping for nine hours or more a night for more than 13 years, they noticed increased risk for those who recently started to sleep more than nine hours.

The researchers found that new long-sleepers have increased likelihood of developing dementia. Those who recently started to sleep more than nine hours were found to have 20 percent increased likelihood of being diagnosed with the neurological condition. They also appeared to have smaller brain volumes.

Pase and colleagues said that longer sleep is not a direct cause of dementia but rather a sign that could indicate chemical changes that happen in the brain. It is also possible that the development of dementia can make people feel more tired.
Regarding the OP's question whether newly retirees enjoy sleeping more, my answer is no. If anything, I probably sleep a little less since I no longer crashed and dozed off after dinner on weekdays.

While working, I was kind of burning my candle from both ends from working and playing hard. My workday routine was to get up at 4:30 or 5:30AM (depending on the season) to be at river for rowing before heading to work. I walked at least 10K during breaks and lunch. After 9 hours of work, I alternated between workout/swim at the gym or walking with my husband and the dog before cooking/eating supper then crashing on the couch for an hour or so. I went to bed at 10 or 11 PM to get about 6-7 hours of sleep before rowing.

Now that I am retired, I still keep my early morning rowing habit but do my walk during the day and workout after supper. Without the need to take a nap in the evening, I can spend time on leisure activities like watching movies, reading books, magazines, surfing the web etc.

Bottom line is that I probably sleep about an hour less (6-7hrs vs 7-8hrs) in retirement. If my need to sleep increases suddenly, I will certainly keep the findings of the above study in mind and start planning my move to Switzerland ;-)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top