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Old 02-24-2017, 03:58 PM
 
5,096 posts, read 8,076,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
I had a bout with C. diff about 20 years ago (at age 50) after taking an antibiotic for a suspected diverticulitis attack. C. diff is horrible, and difficult to treat. I had to be hospitalized on intravenous antibiotics to get rid of it.

According to the Mayo Clinic website, "Even mild to moderate C. difficile infections can quickly progress to a fatal disease if not treated promptly."
I had the same problem and the same treatment. No idea what offending bacteria was though. It was a pretty awful experience. IV to administer the antibiotic every 4 hours, and a pain killer that rapidly knocked me into la-la land, and something to prevent the potential of nausea. I was in the hospital for about 4 days. I was treated well, but I have to admit I was feeling rather stir crazy. In the ER, the doctor who admitted me said if I had waited another day, I would've likely been sent to the morgue. Close call. No difficult problems with the medications.
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Old 02-24-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
antibiotics seems to be standard for a dental infection. The abscess shows there is already infection, the root canal doesn't by itself remove the infection. If the infection itself isn't treated it can (longterm) cause serious complications
And clindamycin is an appropriate antibiotic for the bacteria that most often cause dental abscesses and other dental infections. The bacteria involved are usually those found normally around the teeth and mucous membranes, and can include a mixture of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The process of treating the abscess with a root canal can help to spread the infection via the bloodstream to other areas in the body, in particular the cardiac tissue and valves, if it's not treated with antibiotics.
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Old 02-24-2017, 08:09 PM
Status: "I am Blessed." (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Spurs country. "Go, Spurs, Go!"
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Wow, Jean, I am so sorry you are sick like this. I wish you a full recovery without any repercussions.

Thank you for the information.
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Old 02-24-2017, 08:26 PM
 
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I'm an NP and a nursing school faculty member. If you had told me an antibiotic gave you C. diff., I would have guessed clindamycin. It is one of the worst offenders, but definitely not the only antibiotic that can cause this problem. I tell my nursing students to keep a lookout for C. diff. symptoms in their patients on clindamycin. That said, as Travelassie said, clindamycin is an appropriate antibiotic for oral infections, as it has significant coverage for anaerobic bacteria, as well as some strep and staph strains. Most people do not get a C. diff. infection when they take this antibiotic, but you were unlucky enough to get that misery-inducing infection. I'll keep my fingers crossed that you don't have a recurrence.
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Old 02-24-2017, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
In the ministry, I worked closely with several elderly people who were on numerous medications. In some cases, there were significant complications arising from the interactions of various 'combinations' of prescribed medications.

Doctors and pharmaceutical companies generally know which drugs negatively interact with other drugs. However, there seems to be a disconnect when it comes to the interactions of endless COMBINATIONS of drugs. (For example, They know that Drug A doesn't interact well with drugs B, C or D. However, they don't always know that A also doesn't interact well with a combination of drugs C, F and G or with drugs F, H and J).

To further complicate matters, elderly people don't always keep accurate track of all their medications from different doctors or accurately report ALL their meds. to every doctor (sometimes intentionally).
Due to surgery, I may absorb things or now. This applys to nutirents but this can be managed. When its drugs, taking one is like turning a wheel and hoping it lands where you want. It can be either no reaction at all to a very bad one or just working like way to high a dose. For this reason I keep meds at a minimum. I dropped the ones I was on years ago when I realized all the bad symptoms I was having came immediately after I took them.

No matter what its for, if the effects turn negative, don't just keep adding to it, but back it out and consult your doctor. If they don't listen, find a different one. You can also do your own research on a med and what it reacts negatively to and what it makes ineffective, along with side effects which may not be acceptable.

Your doctor may not be happy, but each of us has a unique mix of reactions and especially if its for something which has other options, its best to avoid the chance. And be your own advocate.
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Old 02-25-2017, 12:32 AM
 
Location: R.I.
982 posts, read 607,771 times
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Very sorry this has happened to you. I lost my Father as a result of a C Diff infection. He went in for knee replacement surgery, and even being age 87 came through the surgery with flying colors. First day in the rehab facility he developed abdominal pain and diarrhea and was immediately sent back to the hospital where he was diagnosed with C Diff. This infection progressed rapidly causing a mega colon and the only chance of saving his life was a colectomy. He was fully coherent at the time the decision for this surgery was made and the last words he said to my sister and I was "if I don't make it make through the surgery do not grieve for me as I have lived a very full life". My father did make it through the surgery but never regained consciousness, and a day later we made the hard decision to take him off life support.

Last edited by Nightengale212; 02-25-2017 at 12:34 AM.. Reason: spelling error
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Old 02-25-2017, 06:40 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,676,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
I'm an NP and a nursing school faculty member. If you had told me an antibiotic gave you C. diff., I would have guessed clindamycin. It is one of the worst offenders, but definitely not the only antibiotic that can cause this problem. I tell my nursing students to keep a lookout for C. diff. symptoms in their patients on clindamycin. That said, as Travelassie said, clindamycin is an appropriate antibiotic for oral infections, as it has significant coverage for anaerobic bacteria, as well as some strep and staph strains. Most people do not get a C. diff. infection when they take this antibiotic, but you were unlucky enough to get that misery-inducing infection. I'll keep my fingers crossed that you don't have a recurrence.
This is what I found in researching c.diff and clindamycin. While clindamyacin is a suitable choice for dental procedures, there are others that can also be used. My dentist office has a blanket generic script for clindamyacin after dental procedures that require an antibiotic. I think if a person is 65 and the odds of c.diff is higher, practictioners should take that into consideration.

One other point I didn't make clear is that the c.diff bacteria is not present in everyone's gut and therefore won't be a problem for all.

I hope I don't have a reoccurrence either, a 20% reoccurrence rate is sobering and I am following my doctor's advice. If you have anything you think may be of value to help me, please post here or DM me, thanks.
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Old 02-25-2017, 06:53 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,676,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightengale212 View Post
Very sorry this has happened to you. I lost my Father as a result of a C Diff infection. He went in for knee replacement surgery, and even being age 87 came through the surgery with flying colors. First day in the rehab facility he developed abdominal pain and diarrhea and was immediately sent back to the hospital where he was diagnosed with C Diff. This infection progressed rapidly causing a mega colon and the only chance of saving his life was a colectomy. He was fully coherent at the time the decision for this surgery was made and the last words he said to my sister and I was "if I don't make it make through the surgery do not grieve for me as I have lived a very full life". My father did make it through the surgery but never regained consciousness, and a day later we made the hard decision to take him off life support.
I'm so sorry about your father, he had a great outlook on life which must have made it even harder to lose him.

I worked in the medical field and was aware of c. diff but thought of it as an old person disease found in the hospital or nursing home, those with weakened immune systems and other risk factors. I didn't know about the antibiotic connection.

I like to think I'm not as old as I am, which made me gloss over the c.diff warning in the clindamycin pamphlet, thinking it couldn't happen to me. The thread about what age is middle-aged, old, senior or elderly may be up to debate in our minds but here's what is posted on WebMD as one of the risk factors:
Advanced age -- 65 or older

So medically, we are either advanced age or not.

Last edited by jean_ji; 02-25-2017 at 07:01 AM..
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Old 02-25-2017, 07:17 AM
 
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I'm sorry you had this experience. Thank you for sharing it.

You are very, very fortunate as C diff can be very serious. And pretty much all antibiotics increase your risk of getting C diff.

Did you call the dentist to let him know what happened? This is useful, as it may make him slightly more rigorous about only using antibiotics when they are truly needed, and warning about C diff and perhaps encouraging folks to take probiotics.

There is evidence that taking probiotics during the antibiotic course decreases the chances of developing Cdiff. The probiotic that was studied the most that showed this affect is the name brand FLorastor. You should talk about it with your doctor.

We should all make sure there is a very good reason to take antibiotics.
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Old 02-25-2017, 07:50 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,676,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfcambridge View Post
I'm sorry you had this experience. Thank you for sharing it.

You are very, very fortunate as C diff can be very serious. And pretty much all antibiotics increase your risk of getting C diff.

Did you call the dentist to let him know what happened? This is useful, as it may make him slightly more rigorous about only using antibiotics when they are truly needed, and warning about C diff and perhaps encouraging folks to take probiotics.

There is evidence that taking probiotics during the antibiotic course decreases the chances of developing Cdiff. The probiotic that was studied the most that showed this affect is the name brand FLorastor. You should talk about it with your doctor.

We should all make sure there is a very good reason to take antibiotics.
Thank you, I am already taking Florastor and eating more soluble fiber, like my steel cut oats and fermented foods with probiotics such as yougurt and miso which may help.

I was not told or aware I should take a probiotic supplement by the dentist or pharmacy. I knew to increase my yogurt consumption with an antibiotic. After my diagnosis and second antibiotic prescription for the c.diff, the nurse told me to add a probiotic from the pharmacy. Now I will know for the next time, if I need an antibiotic.

I did tell my dentist and let him know I'm postponing my crown that was to be scheduled until things settle down.
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